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Dance Party USA Senior Prom playlist:

Spring Affair – Donna Summer
Cherish – Madonna Cicconne
The Way That You Love Me – Paula Abdul
Make That Move – Shalamar
Just A Friend – Biz Markie
Take Me Home – Cher
Run Away – 10cc
Survivor – Cindy Bullens
I Need Your Loving – Teena Marie
Lightning Lipsync: "Love Song" by Madonna Cicconne
You Don’t Know A Good Thing – Michael Zager Band
I Love You – Climax Blues Band
Love Shack – B- 52’s
People In Love – 10cc

Runaway is a 10cc single . It comes from their album Ten out of 10 . The single was only released in England.

It is one of the songs written by Andrew Gold, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman in the period that it looked like Gold became the producer of the album. That did not end and Runaway disappeared on the shelf, but appeared on the American version of the album.

Runaway is used as Runaway (runaways) and Run Away (run away). The background choir is similar to the choir from I'm Not in Love.

B-side was Action Man in Motown Suit, which featured both the European and American pressing of the album.

Personnel:

Eric Stewart: Lead Vocal, Guitar, Synthesizer, Backing Vocal
Graham Gouldman: Bass, Backing Vocal, Guitar
Andrew Gold: Backing Vocal, Electric Piano, Synthesizer, Percussion
Michael Boddicker, James Newton Howard & Suzanne Ciani: Synclavier

Dance Party USA playlist:

Never Gonna Give You Up – Rick Astley
Too Hot – Kool & The Gang
Ashford & Simpson – Found A Cure
Touch Me All Night Long – Cathy Dennis
Don’t Stop Now – The Cover Girls
You Better You Bet – The Who
Ain’t No Stopping Us Now – McFadden & Whitehead

Too Close To Home:

Taken from her lost second album, "Steal the Night".
Courtesy of Blue Lobster Records
https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/cindybullens13
https://cindybullens.bandcamp.com/album/steal-the-night
https://soundcloud.com/cindybullens/sets/steal-the-night

Personnel:
Backing Vocals – Jon Joyce, Cindy Bullens & Mark Doyle
Bass – Roger Freeland (tracks: A3, A5, B2, B3, B5)
Design – Deborah May
Drums, Percussion – Thom Mooney
Electric Piano, Acoustic Piano, Synthesizer – Trantham Whitley
Engineer [2nd] – Barbara Issak, David Ahlert, Rick Ash
Engineer [Recording], Mixed By – Neil Brody
Mastered By – Brian Gardner
Mixed By, Producer, Lead Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Bass, Percussion – Mark Doyle
Mixed By, Producer, Rhythm Guitar [Electric and Acoustic], Harmonica, Percussion, Lead Vocals – Cindy Bullens
Photography By – Georgina Karvellas

Don't Touch My Daughter:

The mother (Victoria Principal) of a threatened girl finds a way to stop a child molester (Jonathan Banks) when the law cannot.

This is my favorite episode, "My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage", taken from the musical family sitcom, "The Partridge Family".

Here's the story about my favorite episode:

A Russian handyman, who claims to be a world-class artist, paints a nude woman on the family's garage that puts the neighborhood in an uproar.

Guest Star: Arte Johnson as Nicholas Minsky Pushkin
Song: "Last Night", performed by Debbie Sims (widowed mother on lead vocals)

Note: strong and powerful background vocals on Debbie Sims' northern soul version of this song are more soulful than the first backing vocals of Shirley Jones and The Ron Hicklin Singers that sounded soulless, weak and powerless.

LAST NIGHT
Performed by Debbie Sims
Written by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo

Musicians:

Lead Vocal – Debbie Sims
Music played The Wrecking Crew
Background Vocals – Don Wood, Russell Gonzalez, Alison Edwards , Laurie Maitland, Liz McKay, Theresa Joanou

Taken from her lost second album, "Steal the Night".
Courtesy of Blue Lobster Records
https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/cindybullens13
https://cindybullens.bandcamp.com/album/steal-the-night
https://soundcloud.com/cindybullens/sets/steal-the-night

Personnel:
Backing Vocals – Jon Joyce, Cindy Bullens & Mark Doyle
Bass – Roger Freeland (tracks: A3, A5, B2, B3, B5)
Design – Deborah May
Drums, Percussion – Thom Mooney
Electric Piano, Acoustic Piano, Synthesizer – Trantham Whitley
Engineer [2nd] – Barbara Issak, David Ahlert, Rick Ash
Engineer [Recording], Mixed By – Neil Brody
Mastered By – Brian Gardner
Mixed By, Producer, Lead Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Bass, Percussion – Mark Doyle
Mixed By, Producer, Rhythm Guitar [Electric and Acoustic], Harmonica, Percussion, Lead Vocals – Cindy Bullens
Photography By – Georgina Karvellas

with scenes from "The Woman Hunter" with Barbara Eden, Stuart Whitman and Robert Vaughn

Desire Wire features the track, "Survivor", which peaked at number 56 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in February 1979.[2]

missing video of 1989

Cindy is a 1978 American musical television film that features an entirely African-American cast. Directed by William A. Graham, the film is an urbanized retelling of Cinderella.

Plot[edit]
After World War II, Cindy (Woodard) has moved from the south to live in Harlem with her newly blended family. She finds herself constantly abused by her stepmother and stepsisters. Her father (Mitchell) provides some comfort but cannot prevent the abuse entirely. One night, she meets Captain Joe Prince (Davis) and is swept off her feet. Soon after, a romance ensues.

Cast[edit]
Charlayne Woodard as Cindy
Mae Mercer as Sara Hayes
Nell Carter as Olive
Alaina Reed Hall as Venus
Scoey Mitchell as Cindy's Father
Clifton Davis as Captain Joe Prince
W. Benson Terry as Miles Archer

"Love My Way" is a song by English band The Psychedelic Furs. It was released in July 1982[1] as the first single from their third studio album Forever Now. Written by the four members of the group and produced by Todd Rundgren (who also played marimba on the song), the song reached the top 10 of the charts in New Zealand, top 30 in Australia and the top 50 in the United Kingdom and United States.

Front man of the group Richard Butler had a specific audience in mind when he penned the lyrics to this song. He explained himself thus in an interview with Creem in 1982: "It's basically addressed to people who are messed up about their sexuality, and says 'Don't worry about it.' It was originally written for gay people."

Release and reception
Released in 1982, "Love My Way" peaked at number nine in New Zealand, where it spent 21 weeks on the chart.[2] The song peaked at number 42 in the UK[3][4] and number 44 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.[5] It also reached number 30 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock chart and number 40 on the Dance Music/Club Play Singles chart.[5]

British filmmaker Tim Pope directed the official music video for "Love My Way" in 1982, and it was placed in regular rotation on MTV.[6]

The single was released in the UK with the non-album B-side, "Aeroplane."[7] In the US, the B-side was changed to a different non-album track, "I Don't Want to Be Your Shadow".[8] Both songs are included on the 2002 reissue of Forever Now.[9]

Usage in media
The song is featured in the 1983 film Valley Girl and appears on the soundtracks of the 1998 film The Wedding Singer, the 2017 film Call Me by Your Name (where its appearance inspired a major surge in streaming popularity)[10], and the 2002 video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City on new wave radio station Wave 103.[11] The song is also downloadable content for the Rock Band series of music video games.

In 1974, 10cc appeared on the BBC’s series In Concert, where they performed hits such as the opener “Silly Love,” “Wall Street Shuffle,” and “Rubber Bullets” but also “Baron Samedi” and “Oh Effendi.”

originally done by George Stewart & Laurie Maitland

‘It Doesn’t Matter At All’ is one of the album highlights. A late choice as a second single, it died a death which is a great shame because while perhaps not as inventive or original as some of the band’s best biggest hits it features one of their loveliest melodies. A sort of ‘I’m Not In Love’ from the other perspective, this is someone deep in love trying to get his loved one to admit that she is too and that it’s the rest of the world who should be ignorant of their love. People call the narrator ‘crazy’ and ‘a fool’ for being in love, but that ‘doesn’t matter at all’ if she loves him too. The hint is that the narrator is being mocked for being overly-emotional and OTT in admitting his feelings (in contrast to the in-denial narrator of ‘Love’ who makes up excuses for his signs of affection) and – in the third verse – that this might be a one-way uncomfortable relationship, with the narrator a stalker (‘Hey I’ve been talked about the way I’ve been following you – but I don’t give a damn when it feels so right!’) Eric Stewart proves again that he’s one of the best pop singers of the day with a great vocal full of love and honey, the arrangement is subtle (with O’Malley’s muted, mournful sounding synthesiser part particularly spot-on) and there are more hooks in this one song than on the rest of the album. Of course, we’ve heard this sort of song lots of times before over the years and there isn’t the usual 10cc intellectual twist going on here – but arguably this song sounds better for not having one, adding a touch of emotion to an album that badly needs it. Lyrically, too, this is nothing special but it does its job and there’s a particularly strong second verse where the narrator says thinking without feeling is simply stupid (‘You’re living in a world where reason is a waste of time, nobody talking, the atmosphere cold!’) A likable song – whatever the narrator’s motives really are – this song’s quiet, humble melody and appealing sounds should have made the song a much bigger hit than it was. Sadly it’s the only song from this whole album to be re-issued as part of the band’s ‘Tenology’ box set in 2012 – although at least its one of the best things here.

I'm Not In Love:

I'm Not In Love: "I'm Not in Love" is a song by English group 10cc, written by band members Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman. It is notable for its innovative and distinctive backing track, composed mostly of the band's multitracked vocals. Released in the UK in May 1975 as the second single from the band's third album The Original Soundtrack, it became the second of the group's three number-one singles in the UK between 1973 and 1978, topping the UK singles chart for two weeks. The song was also the band's breakthrough hit worldwide, reaching number one in Ireland and Canada and number two on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, as well as reaching the top 10 in Australia, New Zealand and several European countries.

Brace Yourself from Brady Bunch:

Marcia tearfully frets "I'm ugly, ugly, ugly!" over her new braces. Then her date Alan Anthony (Mike Robertson) cancels, claiming that he must go out of town with his parents to visit a relative. Greg, Mike, and Alice attempt to arrange replacement dates, but a lack of coordination ruins the plan. Then just before the night of the dance, Alan arrives ... showing off his new braces (which he had fitted after an accident with his bicycle).

Guest stars: Jerry Levreau as Harold Reynolds
Brian Nash as Joey Michaelson
John Daniels as Eddie the delivery courier
Molly Dodd as the sales clerk

Maybe it’s because he’s been relatively low-profile in recent years, but it’s a little too easy to underestimate Eric Stewart. The 10cc vocalist and songwriter has a resumé that stretches even further than that cherished band’s exemplary pop and album rock of the 1970s and later.

Hotlegs

By the time he became a co-founder of the group, Stewart (born in Droylsden, Lancashire on 20 January 1945) was already vastly experienced. After some time in local bands, he joined chart group the Mindbenders, fronted by Wayne Fontana. In 1968, he had the presence of mind to invest in Strawberry Studios in Stockport, which gave him creative freedom and led to his friendship with fellow English singer-songwriter Graham Gouldman.

After Gouldman also invested in the studio, a production deal led to the brief formation (with Graham for a while, but chiefly with Lol Crème and Kevin Godley) of the bubblegum band Hotlegs, who enjoyed a huge one-off hit in 1970 with ‘Neanderthal Man.’

When the quartet reconvened in 1972 as 10cc, the stage was set for some of the most inventive British music of that decade, on a series of sparkling albums and major hit singles. From ‘Donna’ to ‘Rubber Bullets’ and on to ‘I’m Not In Love,’ ‘I’m Mandy Fly Me,’ ‘Art For Art’s Sake,’ ‘Dreadlock Holiday’ and countless others, 10cc were a major force for the rest of the decade.

Stewart went on to collaborate frequently with Paul McCartney, make solo albums (the last being 2009’s Vive La Difference) and record occasionally as part of 10cc, up until 1995’s Mirror Mirror. He’s much respected as both a producer and an engineer, in which role his credits include Moody Blues Justin Hayward & 10cc in 1975John Lodge’s Blue Jays album, records by Sad Café and Agnetha Fältskog of ABBA, and Sedaka’s Back by Neil Sedaka, who owed the momentum for his UK-fuelled comeback of the 1970s to his work with the members of 10cc at Strawberry.

As we look forward to Eric’s next adventures, he’s given us a wealth of music to explore, with 10cc and far beyond. We recommend their excellent four-disc retrospective Tenology, which provides a great cross-section of this distinguished British band, with hits, album tracks and rarities. As Stewart told the Guardian about the much-loved original quartet: “We took on the mantle of The Beatles. We experimented on every song – you’ll never hear two that sound alike.”

Is released in 1988 as a single from the latest album Goodbye Blue Sky. With a seventeenth position in the Dutch charts, the song becomes a modest hit.

10CC - Live at Wembley Conference Centre 1982.

Setlist:

01 - Art of the art's sake
02 - Lying here with you
03 - The power of love
04 - I'm Mandy fly me
05 - The things we do for love
06 - The wall street shuffle
07 - Dreadlock holiday
08 - I'm not in love
09 - Feel the benefit
10 - Credits

Total Time: 00:55:33

DVD Info
DVD Size: DVD 5
Menu: Yes
Chapters (SongSelect): Yes
SoundMenu: Yes
AudioSetup: Yes (Audio 2 System (Option)): AC3/5.1 & AC3 Stereo)
Video: NTSC/16:9 Widescreen
Audio1: AC3/448 Kbps/5.1 Ch
Audio2: AC3/448 Kbps/2 Ch

DVD All Region
I Accept Paypal
DVD Included Art Work, Art Work on Disc, DVD Box

https://tributeto10cc.ecrater.com/p/30972395/10cc-live-in-wembley-london-1982-dvd

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of smash hit I'm Not in Love, the original members of 10cc - Graham Gouldman, Eric Stewart, Kevin Godley and Lol Creme - reunite to tell their story. The documentaryshares the secrets to some of their most successful records, from the writing and the recording to the tours and the tensions.

With contributions from an impressive array of music industry legends including 10cc's band manager Harvey Lisberg, lyricist Sir Tim Rice, broadcaster Paul Gambaccini, legendary producer Trevor Horn, Stewart Copeland (The Police), Graham Nash (The Hollies) and Dan Gillespie Sells (The Feeling), not only does this film highlight the diversity of these four brilliant musicians' songwriting talent, but it also delves into the influence they had, as well as the politics beneath their acrimonious split in 1976, at the height of their fame.

"I'm Mandy Fly Me" is a single by 10cc released in 1976. It was taken from the How Dare You! album. It reached No. 6 on the UK singles chart.

Writing and recording
In a radio interview,[1] Stewart recalled the origins of the song "I'm Mandy Fly Me":

“ National Airlines used to have this beautiful poster that they displayed of this gorgeous stewardess inviting you onto the plane. Now her name wasn't Mandy actually, it was something like, er, oh gosh knows, "I'm Cindy", a very American name. "I'm Cindy, fly me" which was a quite sexual connotation as well, but I remember seeing in Manchester this beautiful poster and just below it was this tramp, I mean a serious tramp, quite a raggedy guy, looking up at this girl, and I thought God, do you know, there's a song there. Look at that guy looking up at Cindy-fly-me and I know he's never gonna get on an aeroplane, I don't think, except in his dreams.
So I brought it back, the idea back to the studio, where we were writing for the How Dare You! album, and put it to the guys: "Anybody interested in this 'I'm Mandy Fly Me'". I'd switched it to Mandy. And Graham said "yeah, that sounds like a good idea. I've got some ideas, I've got some chords. Let's slot those things in, try it, mess it around". We wrote it, and we didn't like it. We, we scrapped it. It just wasn't going anywhere.

But, enter from stage left, ha ha, the "wicked villain" Kevin Godley, twiddling his moustache, says "I know what's wrong with it. Let's sit down again." He said "I think it just gets too bland, it just goes on, on one plane, your verses and your middles and your der-der-der, they're all going on the one plane. What it needs is someone to go 'Bash' on the side of your head". So we changed the rhythm completely, and we put two whacking great guitar solos in there, in the middle of this quiet, soft, floaty song. Once we'd got that idea in, it, it just gelled into something else. Again, impossible to dance to, as a lot of 10cc tracks were, but once Kevin had put that in, he became the third writer in the song so we were quite democratic in that way.


The intro to "I'm Mandy Fly Me" features one of the bridge sections of the band's 1974 song "Clockwork Creep". The section, whose lyrics are "Oh, no you'll never get me up in one of these again / 'Cause what goes up must come down", is rendered soft and tinny, as if heard playing from a portable transistor radio or an in-flight audio system

Personnel
Eric Stewart – lead guitar, lead and backing vocals, piano, whistle
Graham Gouldman – electric six-string, electric four-string and acoustic bass, backing vocals, zithers
Kevin Godley – drums, backing vocals
Lol Creme – lead guitar, backing vocals, Moog synthesizer, vibes

'Feel The Love' is like a complete mis-reading of everything 10cc always stood for: the comedy vocals, the silly chorus ('Oomachasooma', as in the name of a cupid figure the narrator pleads to for love), the warm lyrics about love and the 'Dreadlock Holiday' reggae backing ought to add up to the catchiest 10cc-hit-by-numbers in years. Instead it's a gloriously sly, sarcastic song where Eric jumps into love knowing full well the odds of finding a compatible partner are a 'million to one' and he's going to get burned - but he can't stop himself and 'ignore this feeling'. Nothing matters more than the one you love - it's the working out who you love that's the heartbreaker.

Memories is a 10cc single . It comes from their album Ten out of 10 . The single was probably only released in the Netherlands, but did not make the hit parades .

The song, written by Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman , is about the loss of innocence. This was well present in childhood, but was then lost.

B-side was Overdraft in Overdrive , which was also on the album.

Musicians
Eric Stewart - vocals, electric piano , synthesizer , piano , background vocals, guitar , percussion
Graham Gouldman - bass guitar , double bass , backing vocals, percussion guitar
Paul Burgess - percussion

Is released in 1988 as a single from the latest album Goodbye Blue Sky. With a seventeenth position in the Dutch charts, the song becomes a modest hit.

Taken from their album, "The History Mix Volume 1"

Golden Boy is a 1939 drama romance film based on the Clifford Odets play of the same name. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian, The film stars Barbara Stanwyck, Adolphe Menjou and William Holden.

Production
Golden Boy features William Holden in his film debut, the role that made him a star: a promising violinist who wants to be a boxer. Barbara Stanwyck plays his love interest. The supporting cast includes Lee J. Cobb in an unusual role as the bewhiskered Italian immigrant father of Holden's character.

The producers were initially unhappy with Holden's work and tried to dismiss him, but Stanwyck insisted that he be retained. Thirty-nine years later, when Holden and Stanwyck were joint presenters at the 1978 Academy Awards, he interrupted their reading of a nominee list to publicly thank her for saving his career.

Cast

Barbara Stanwyck as Lorna Moon[1]
Adolphe Menjou as Tom Moody[1]
William Holden as Joe Bonaparte[1]
Lee J. Cobb as Mr. Bonaparte[1]
Joseph Calleia as Eddie Fuseli[1]
Sam Levene as Siggie[1]
Edward Brophy as Roxy Lewis[1]

Adaptations
On January 7, 1940, Stanwyck performed a parody of Golden Boy on The Jack Benny Program.[2]

Runaway is a 10cc single . It comes from their album Ten out of 10 . The single was only released in England.

It is one of the songs written by Andrew Gold , Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman in the period that it looked like Gold became the producer of the album. That did not end and Runaway disappeared on the shelf, but appeared on the American version of the album.

Runaway is used as Runaway (runaways) and Run Away (run away). The background choir is similar to the choir from I'm Not in Love .

B-side was Action Man in Motown Suit , which featured both the European and American pressing of the album.

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