abooks

abooks

abooks

subscribers

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/agricola-germania-a-dialogue-concerning-oratory
These three vibrant texts show different sides of the Roman historian Tacitus (c56–c102 CE), best known for his principal (and much longer) legacies of The Annals and The Histories.

Agricola was a successful general and governor of Britain (77-83CE), a task which he carried out with firmness and probity - in contrast to much of the corruption and repression in place during the reign of Emperor Domitian. Included in his account are the prebattle speeches of both Agricola and the Briton Calgacus.

Tacitus' account of Germania shows a very different land with its many tribes, their habits and qualities in a strongly rural and resistant environment.

A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, by contrast, is placed decidedly at the heart of Roman culture, a survey of rhetoric and the art of eloquence. The ability to speak clearly and well was admired throughout the Greek and Roman eras; educated men were expected to have received training in form and delivery: exordium, narration, period. Tacitus presents individuals who display the art of oratory in various forms, referring to the giants of the past - the speeches of Cicero, Brutus, Caesar and many others were kept in volumes and studied. And they question whether eloquence and the skills of oratory had declined in the age.

MP4: https://seed125.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/d0nKaeZUzTdF.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E & https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Since it was first published more than forty years ago, Robert Fitzgerald’s prizewinning translation of Homer’s battle epic has become a classic in its own right: a standard against which all other versions of The Iliad are compared. This definitive translation of Homer’s epic is timeless in its authority and always fresh in its vivid rendering of the preeminent war story of the Western world.

In keeping with the oral tradition of the time, Dan Stevens’s extraordinary narration makes this epic tale come alive. The listener becomes totally immersed in the adventure and drama of the story - this is the way The Iliad was meant to be experienced.

Also included on the program is a portion of the poem read in ancient Greek so that listeners may experience the lyricism and music of the original language.

MP4: https://seed125.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/GhF1Nz5V2BMt.mp4

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Robert Fitzgerald's translation of The Odyssey has been the standard translation for more than three generations of students and poets. Macmillan Audio is delighted to publish the first ever audio edition of this classic work, the greatest of all epic poems. Fitzgerald's supple verse is ideally suited for audio, recounting the story of Odysseus' long journey back to his wife and home after the Trojan War. Homer's tale of love, adventure, food and drink, sensual pleasure, and mortal danger reaches the English-language listener in all its glory.

In keeping with the oral tradition of the time, Dan Stevens, whose many celebrated performances include Downton Abbey's Matthew Crawley, makes this epic tale come alive. The listener becomes totally immersed in the adventure and drama of the story – this is the way The Odyssey was meant to be experienced.

Also included on the program is a portion of the poem read in ancient Greek so that listeners may experience the lyricism and music of the original language.

MP4: https://seed177.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/NJzDcylwNQWT.mp4

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/politics
The title Politics literally means ‘the things concerning the city’. Here, Aristotle considers the important role that politics plays in the life of the community and its contribution to harmonious and virtuous existence.

It is divided into eight books and was a cornerstone in political philosophy for centuries despite certain features - including attitudes towards slaves and women - clearly placing its conclusions and advice within the confines of Athenian society of the fourth century BCE. Aristotle’s fundamental view is that the individual needs the city more than the city needs the individual, not least because a well-ordered city-state offers obvious benefits beyond simply self-protection and commerce. It makes possible a broader life, allowing in addition education and leisure, leading its citizens towards a life of virtue.

In book two, Aristotle considers the best regime for the city, looking at the three main forms of his time - democracy, oligarchy/aristocracy and monarchy. He considers the qualification to be a citizen and participate in the political process - offering a wider view than Plato, for example.

Revolution, change, constitutional developments, insurrections - these issues of instability are discussed with references to specific examples. And in later books he proposes the conditions for the best state, the ideal state, ‘for a state is not a community of living beings only, but a community of equals, aiming at the best life possible’.

MP4: https://seed163.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/upmykw7Sx8to.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs & https://youtu.be/yVOw5fsUCfQ & https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
One of the most significant books ever written by a head of State, the Meditations are a collection of philosophical thoughts by the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180 ce). Covering issues such as duty, forgiveness, brotherhood, strength in adversity and the best way to approach life and death, the Meditations have inspired thinkers, poets and politicians since their first publication more than 500 years ago. Today, the book stands as one of the great guides and companions - a cornerstone of Western thought.

MP4: https://seed171.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/M1U3QszG8Cfe.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs & https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Iamblichus' famous biography of Pythagoras, which has been republished by the MSAC Philosophy Group. Details the interesting life narrative of the one of the great thinkers in the early Greek world.
MP4: https://seed160.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/buOyT9iytwT9.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Agamemnon is the first part of the Oresteia trilogy by the Greek playwright Aeschylus. Each of the plays that form part of The Oresteia can stand alone, but they perfectly complement one other in a longer narrative. Agamemnon provides the seed of all the themes that are explored in part two, The Libation Bearers, and three, The Eumenides.

Agamemnon tells the story of the homecoming of Agamemnon, the King of Mycenae, after the fall of Troy. Waiting for him at home was his wife, Queen Clytemnestra, with murder in her heart. She wants him dead to avenge the sacrifice of her daughter Iphigenia, to be able to openly embrace her lover Aegisthus, and to become ruler of Mycenae. Clytemnestra’s action would trigger a spate of tragedies.

MP4: https://seed307.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/WAfe2H0YpSQA.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
The fifty daughters of Danaos have with their father fled by ship from Egypt, escaping compulsatory marriage with their fifty cousins, the sons of Aegyptos. They arrive in Argos, where, by supplication to the king and people, they seek refuge from their cousins, who sailed in pursuit. Their devout abhorrence of the marriage is the weightiest theme of the play.

MP4: https://seed160.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/ZE9iQCG6gGJj.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Aeschylus’ historical tragedy Persians, first presented to an Athenian audience in 472 BC.
MP4: https://seed167.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/OVbochYvMOZk.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - https://www.audioconnoisseur.com
Translated by W. E. D. Rouse, The March of the Ten Thousand is one of the most admired and widely read pieces of ancient literature to come down to us. Xenophon employs a very simple, straightforward style to describe what is probably the most exciting military adventure ever undertaken. When Cyrus, brother to the Great King of Persia, attempts to overthrow his feckless sibling in 401 B.C., he employs a Greek mercenary army of 10,000 hoplites as the core of his rebellious force. Xenophon, who seeks the advice of Socrates before joining, is among the common soldiers. Inexorably, Cyrus and his huge army march southward 1,500 miles from the coast of Ionia all the way to Babylon, and there give battle to Artaxerxes, the Great King. Although the battle is soon decided in favor of Cyrus, the would-be usurper is killed while in pursuit of the king. Meanwhile, the Greeks are victorious on their part of the battlefield and await the return of Cyrus and his instructions.

By the next morning, they realize that Cyrus is dead and that his allies have melted away in the night, leaving them alone trapped behind enemy lines within a few miles of the Persian capital. And only a few miles distant lies an enormous Persian army with vengeance in mind. Despair deepens when the Greek officer corps is treacherously murdered during peace talks. Alone, leaderless and hopelessly outnumbered, the Greeks nevertheless elect new officers.

Xenophon steps into the pages of history with his magnificent rallying speeches and selfless acts of courage. Follow one of history's most spirited bands of soldiers as they fight and maneuver their way through 1,500 miles of hostile territory seething with adversaries. It is an epic of courage, faith and democratic principle.

MP4: https://seed125.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/yWkAtlWC5Gz0.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs & https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
"My fame is written in the heavens, and my fate too..." So speaks Odysseus as he starts to recount his struggles to sail home to Ithaca, in one of the greatest pieces of storytelling in Western literature. The Odyssey is his incredible traveller's tale, and also the story of his faithful wife Penelope who waits for him, besieged by suitors, and their son Telemachus who has a quest of his own.

In a 20-year journey, fabulous fantasy mixes with extraordinary reality as Odysseus encounters enchantresses, nymphs, monsters, prophets, and ghosts. From the temptations of the lotus flowers and the Sirens' song to the horrors of the Cyclops' cave and the Land of the Dead, the story of his encounters is riveting. We hear of Circe, who turned his men into swine; Calypso, who held Odysseus prisoner for seven years; and the dreadful six-headed monster Scylla who devoured some of his crew. And we hear of the Gods, who have a vital role to play...

Dramatised by major contemporary poet Simon Armitage to celebrate the return of the Olympics to Athens, this full-cast production brings Odysseus's adventures to vivid life, conveying all the excitement, suspense, and poetry of the original. A stunning aural rollercoaster ride, The Odyssey will have your heart in your mouth and stir your soul.

MP4: https://seed171.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/9WmjynQpss5X.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/XtK4G877PJc

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw The Saga of the Volsungs https://www.bitchute.com/video/P5N4Vom3ng0E
"The poems of the Poetic Edda have waited a long time for a Modern English translation that would do them justice. Here it is at last (Odin be praised!) and well worth the wait. These amazing texts from a thirteenth-century Icelandic manuscript are of huge historical, mythological, and literary importance, containing the lion's share of information that survives today about the gods and heroes of pre-Christian Scandinavians, their unique vision of the beginning and end of the world, etc.

"Jackson Crawford's modern versions of these poems are authoritative and fluent and often very gripping. With their individual headnotes and complementary general introduction, they supply today's readers with most of what they need to know in order to understand and appreciate the beliefs, motivations, and values of the Vikings." (Dick Ringler, professor emeritus of English and Scandinavian studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison)

MP4: https://seed126.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/ePMSzWg8gqhi.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/BUHZ-H0fyus

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw The Poetic Edda https://www.bitchute.com/video/ePMSzWg8gqhi
The fifty daughters of Danaos have with their father fled by ship from Egypt, escaping compulsatory marriage with their fifty cousins, the sons of Aegyptos. They arrive in Argos, where, by supplication to the king and people, they seek refuge from their cousins, who sailed in pursuit. Their devout abhorrence of the marriage is the weightiest theme of the play.

MP4: https://seed177.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/P5N4Vom3ng0E.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Pompey, Caesar, Cicero, Brutus, Antony: the names resonate across thousands of years. Major figures in the civil wars that brutally ended the Roman republic, their lives still haunt us as examples of how the hunger for personal power can overwhelm collective politics, how the exaltation of the military can corrode civilian authority, and how the best intentions can lead to disastrous consequences. Plutarch renders these history-making lives as flesh-and-blood characters, often by deftly marshalling small details such as the care Brutus exercised in his use of money or the disdain Caesar felt for the lofty eloquence of Cicero.

Plutarch was a Greek intellectual who lived roughly 100 years after the age of Caesar. At home in the world of Roman power, he preferred to live in the past, among the great figures of Greek and Roman history. He intended his biographical profiles to be mirrors of character that readers could use to inspire their own values and behavior - emulating virtues and rejecting flaws. For Plutarch, character was destiny for both the individual and the republic. He was our first master of the biographical form, a major source for Shakespeare and Gibbon.

This edition features a new translation by Pamela Mensch that lends a brilliant clarity to Plutarch's prose. James Romm's notes guide listeners gracefully through the people, places, and events named in the profiles. And Romm's preface, along with Mary Beard's introduction, provide the perfect frame for understanding Plutarch and the momentous history he narrates.

MP4: https://seed177.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/NXwH75r1sYkb.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/_zkSMauDA3Y

https://mega.nz/folder/j7w1VbYZ#M-0cjtgUs775O3DV41E_EQ
Nikola Tesla is the true unsung prophet of the electronic age, without whom our radio, auto ignition, telephone, alternating current power generation and transmission, and television would all have been impossible. Yet, his life and times have vanished largely from public access.

This autobiography gives a unique and personal account of different periods in his life. From Tesla's early life to his end, he embraced a persona of brilliance, ambition, and creativity. Explore the events that not only shaped his life, but mankind itself.

MP4: https://seed306.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/i6OxefYLO66T.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/daphnis-and-chloe
Daphnis and Chloe is one of the most engaging and gently erotic stories to emerge from the ancient worlds of Greece and Rome. It is a pastoral tale, telling of a boy and a girl, both abandoned (but separately) as babies on nearby hillsides; one becomes a goatherd, the other a shepherdess, and a mutual attraction arises as they move from childhood to adolescence and to the slow discovery of desire. Will aggressive forces and rival suitors prevent a natural consummation and happy conclusion?

Daphnis and Chloe is a gem from the pen of the otherwise unknown second-century CE Greek writer Longus. It is the only work of his to survive, and little is known of him. Though perhaps overshadowed by the Roman magnificence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses (dating from a century earlier), Longus’ story entranced the choreographer Michel Fokine, who persuaded the French composer Maurice Ravel to write music for a ballet on the love story as part of the Ballets Russes’ season in Paris in 1912. Ravel, inspired, produced one of the most ravishing scores of the Impressionist period. Despite that, Longus’ original text seems to have slipped into obscurity. Here, at last, is the world premiere audiobook recording presented with sensitivity and charm by Nicholas Boulton. The Athenian Society translation.

MP4: https://seed167.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/cN6sToONqR7W.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Though this Word is true evermore, yet men are as unable to understand it when they hear it for the first time as before they have heard it at all. For, though, all things come to pass in accordance with this Word, men seem as if they had no experience of them, when they make trial of words and deeds such as I set forth, dividing each thing according to its nature and showing how it truly is. But other men know not what they are doing when awake, even as they forget what they do in sleep.

MP4: https://seed171.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/UV8vvTSeTLbs.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/the-satyricon
Libidinous, licentious, salacious and very, very funny, The Satyricon is one of the most remarkable documents from ancient Rome. It tells the ribald story of Encolpius, a man of active and varied appetites (powered notably by his passion for his favourite lover, the handsome Giton), who plunges without inhibition into the life of Roman pleasures: orgies of food, feasting, abundant sex and escapades.

The kind of hedonism found occasionally in Roman mosaics is here brought to life. In the feast at the house of Trimalchio we have an extraordinary account of a Roman banquet where dish after dish - each more extravagant than the last - is presented to the diners, who lie on their couches for course after course. And after all that they still find the energy to indulge in intense pleasures of a different kind. Again and again.

There are historical questions around the author - Petronius (c27-66 CE), who lived during the time of Emperor Nero - and the text, which was originally much longer than the sections that have survived. This is of interest to academics but need not deter the enjoyment of the delightfully personal tale that has come down to us.

Among the characters Encolpius encounters is Eumolpus, a poet philosopher whose extravagant (and loud) journeys into epic poetry attract the Roman equivalent of rotten tomatoes. Very, very funny. It must be said, however, that this is literature, aiming high. It presents an engaging picture of Roman low life: 'women hot after gladiators or dusty muleteers', old men casting glances (and more) at shapely youths, and an elaborate ceremony to Priapus in an attempt to restore lost vigour. But it does so with style and elegance, full of classical references to poetry, history and philosophy though often with dry, humorous asides.

Not for the faint-hearted, The Satyricon is a delight from beginning to end, and especially in this hugely entertaining reading by Nicholas Boulton, which opens with a fascinating introduction to the work and its provenance.

MP4: https://seed305.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/snzKGwA7QzLk.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/jason-and-the-golden-fleece
Jason and the Golden Fleece is one of the finest tales of Ancient Greece, an epic journey of adventure and trial standing beside similar stories of Perseus, Theseus and the Labours of Heracles. The finest classic account comes from Apollonius of Rhodes, the Greek poet of the 3rd century BCE and librarian at Alexandria. Though less well-known than Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and much shorter, it is an epic poem which is both exciting and moving, with remarkably vivid portraits of the main characters, Jason and Medea. In the hands of Apollonius, these are far from one-dimensional figures of ancient myth.

Jason is a very human hero, forced to undertake the quest by a vengeful ruler, and though he leads a ship full of heroes - Heracles, Peleus, Caster and Polydeuces among them - he has moments of doubt and prevarication which he has to overcome in order to ultimately grasp the Golden Fleece. And Medea, a virgin witch possessing consummate skill with spells and an ability to be cruel, is shown here with some sympathy, for she is under the sway of the immortals Hera and Athena. Succumbing to their machinations and Eros's arrow, she finds herself on a dangerous path, flouting the will of her powerful father Aeetes, King of the Colchians, to help the Argonauts.

And then there is the ship itself, Argo, wrought with the help of Athena to survive the challenges of a distant voyage past Scylla and Charybdis into the Black Sea. Apollonius weaves plot and poetry, courage and boldness, tenderness and sympathy, to fashion one of the greatest monuments of Western literature. R. C. Seaton's classic translation has been considerably revised for this recording by Nicolas Soames, and it is read with verve by Jonathan Keeble.

MP4: https://seed128.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/LHtT216QkDr0.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/2R2gb0MKJlo

Source: https://archive.org/details/bhagavadgita_1488
Read by Napalm Son. https://www.bitchute.com/channel/napalms0n/
The Bhagavad Gita (/ˌbʌɡəvəd ˈɡiːtɑː, -tə/; Sanskrit: भगवद्गीता, IAST: bhagavad-gītā, lit. "The Song of God"),[1] often referred to as the Gita, is a 700-verse Sanskrit scripture that is part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata (chapters 23–40 of Bhishma Parva).

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
The Bacchae is concerned with two opposite sides of human nature: the rational and civilized side, which is represented by the character of Pentheus, the king of Thebes, and the instinctive side, which is represented by Dionysus. This side is sensual without analysis, it feels a connection between man and beast, and it is a potential source of divinity and spiritual power. In Euripides' plays the gods represent various human qualities, allowing the audience to grapple with considerations of the human condition. The Bacchae seems to be saying that it is perilous to deny or ignore the human desire for Dionysian experience; those who are open to the experience will find spiritual power, and those who suppress or repress the desire in themselves or others will transform it into a destructive force.

https://librivox.org/stories-of-old-greece-and-rome-by-emilie-kip-baker/ - https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
The Stories of Old Greece and Rome is an easy to read summary of all of the famous and not so famous Greek and Roman mythological stories. All of the famous Heroes are here: Theseus, Jason, Hercules, and all of the well known Deities. These stories tell the real detail of the myths, not the ones that have become sanitized (and dare I say it, 'Disneyfied') over the centuries. These are not stories for children, as the old gods and heroes were vengeful and some might say sadistic in their treatment of minor slights and misdemeanors. Putting out of eyes and ripping out of tongues is commonplace, and punishment by death is ever present. It is however fascinating to see how these tales have affected and influenced our culture and have woven themselves into our own myths and stories. (Summary by Kevin Green).

https://nationalvanguard.org/2019/08/on-the-shortness-of-life/ - https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
In this short (50-page) book, in the form of a letter to his friend Paulinus, the Roman philosopher Seneca implores the best among us to forego materialist busy-ness and spend our precious time in serene study of the realities of the Universe, contemplation of the meaning of life, and leading a life of virtue.
By Lucius Annaeus Seneca
Audio recorded by Vanessa Neubauer

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Here are the Socratic Dialogues presented as Plato designed them to be - living discussions between friends and protagonists, with the personality of Socrates himself coming alive as he deals with a host of subjects, from justice and inspiration to courage, poetry and the gods.

Plato's Socratic Dialogues provide a bedrock for classical Western philosophy. For centuries they have been read, studied and discussed via the flat pages of books, but the ideal medium for them is the spoken word. Some are genuine dialogues while some are dialogues reported by a narrator supposedly at a later date.

Ukemi Audiobooks presents all of the Socratic Dialogues in a series of recordings divided into Early Period (Volumes 1 & 2), Middle Period (Volumes 1 & 2) and Late Period (Volume 1) - based on their likely composition by Plato. This opening volume starts with perhaps the most famous speech, The Apology, Socrates' doomed defence against the charge of heresy and corrupting the young. It is followed by Crito, in which Socrates' friend offers to spirit him out of Athens to avoid execution. Among the others are discussions on Courage (Laches), and Friendship (Lysis).

The role of Socrates is taken by David Rintoul, a widely admired and experienced audiobook reader who studied philosophy at university before taking a different path to RADA, TV, theatre and film. He is joined by a broad range of readers, most known to Audible listeners. Each Dialogue is prefaced with a short introduction to set the scene for newcomers to Plato.

http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/the-socratic-dialogues-early-period-volume-1/

MP4: https://seed306.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/bXGZ0WqNrDOa.mp4

https://mega.nz/folder/KhMFDKbY#5k6xwI9odtAtPl8tlBbCWw
Here are the Socratic Dialogues presented as Plato designed them to be - living discussions between friends and protagonists, with the personality of Socrates himself coming alive as he deals with a host of subjects, from justice and inspiration to courage, poetry and the gods.

Plato's Socratic Dialogues provide a bedrock for classical Western philosophy. For centuries they have been read, studied and discussed via the flat pages of books, but the ideal medium for them is the spoken word. Some are genuine dialogues while some are dialogues reported by a narrator supposedly at a later date.

Ukemi Audiobooks presents all of the Socratic Dialogues in a series of recordings divided into Early Period (Volumes 1 & 2), Middle Period (Volumes 1 & 2) and Late Period (Volume 1) - based on their likely composition by Plato. This opening volume starts with perhaps the most famous speech, The Apology, Socrates' doomed defence against the charge of heresy and corrupting the young. It is followed by Crito, in which Socrates' friend offers to spirit him out of Athens to avoid execution. Among the others are discussions on Courage (Laches), and Friendship (Lysis).

The role of Socrates is taken by David Rintoul, a widely admired and experienced audiobook reader who studied philosophy at university before taking a different path to RADA, TV, theatre and film. He is joined by a broad range of readers, most known to Audible listeners. Each Dialogue is prefaced with a short introduction to set the scene for newcomers to Plato.

http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/the-socratic-dialogues-early-period-volume-1/

MP4: https://seed307.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/uwgd92fdZ2a9.mp4

SHOW MORE

Created 1 month ago.

40 videos

CategoryArts & Literature