Aristotle Against Plato

Intro to Aristotle's lecture on Topics applied to the subject of Money embellished by an understanding of Physics.

00:00 Principles of Physics
02:50 Intermediate Without Change

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

This is the text to Part 1 of 9. Although it is less than 2 minutes, a sort of preamble, but it was uploaded twice and it would not play. Will try again some day...

"When arguments reason to false conclusions then the right solution is to demolish the point upon which the falsity depends. One who demolishes this point gives the solution to the argument completely. For it is not enough to object but the reason for the falsity should be demonstrated. Likewise, in genera and differentia and all the terms rendered in definitions one should frame accounts in lieu of their names and then see if there is any discrepancy between them. Lastly, as contributing to knowledge and philosophic wisdom the power of discerning and holding in one view the results of either of two hypothesis is no mean instrument, but for one who can do this it then only remains to make a right choice of one of them."
- Aristotle, Topics [paraphrased by OCS]

These last few statements are the essence of Aristotle's lecture on Topics as it pertains to this lecture segmented into 9 parts and by the end it ought to be clear as to their influence upon it. In addition to Topics, the lecture also draws upon these other lectures of Aristotle's: First Philosophy, Prior Analytics, Posterior Analytics, Eudemian Ethics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, Rhetoric, and Physics.

00:00 Deduction and Induction
03:42 Eternal Quality
(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

00:00 Similar Particulars Stand Under the Same Universal
01:45 Desires
03:38 As Desire is to Motion Choice is to Action
(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity this topic.)

00:00 Human as a Principle of Action and Exchange
04:48 Aristotle's Explanation that Money is Justice

(The cut from this take is my favorite of these 9 parts for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

00:00 Ex as Out of Change
02:49 Conductivity of Exchange
05:20 Justice of Reciprocity
07:17 Definition

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

00:00 Principles of Nature, Laws of Humans
01:30 Pursuit of Happiness
02:42 Motion as Compulsion, Action as Choice
03:27 Contrary of Exchange

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

00:00 Indoctrination
03:30 Contrary of Money
04:49 Stealing

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

Is this sea of currents on the level or not? The same object flowing along the medium of exchange, the activity of desirable work, this intermediate, currency, can be introduced as counterfeit and then used down current as money. (Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

The complete Audio Book of Aristotle's lecture can be find right here on Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/upmykw7Sx8to/
Weary from looking up favorite lines and passages and deciphering various styles and colors of ink, pencil, and highlights accumulated over the years as marginalia or underlines and circles in the text, I saved it to my warm memory chip instead for ease of access. The arrangement is introductory to the novice and summary for the expert. Embellishments, ad libs, and faux pas can be expected in this format, but at the expense of context and contemporary application? Not at all.

This translation is from 1885 by Benjamin Jowett and was the first work of Aristotle to be translated as part of the multi-decade project of the Oxford Translations which was completed in the 1950s. However, the first Greek to English translation of Politics was titled as A Treatise on Government translated by William Ellis in 1776. Thomas Jefferson owned a copy. The founders of the United States were familiar with Aristotle’s analysis of governments and learned well enough to create a superior Constitution.

This is an excerpt from Aristotle in One Take at https://www.bitchute.com/video/HxNikHKjCUyH/

Money equalizes the exchange of disproportionate work. Counterfeit maintains the disproportion. This is an excerpt from Aristotle in One Take found at https://www.bitchute.com/video/Qkf9vJbi8JD2/

04:07 FIRST PHILOSOPHY
In this lecture and several others, Aristotle, refers to this study as First Philosophy. It was not until centuries later after the work was found did academics rename it to Metaphysics. None of the Greek philosophers discussed the nature of existence as coming after physics, let alone name it as such. To call it such is an example of the Turning of Names, meant to deceive that what it is is what it is not. The term has taken on an air of the mysterious, claiming to sense without the senses, to suppose not demonstrate, haughty sophistication and exactly what that implies; the absence of analytics.

First Philosophy was The book for authorities to eschew and during the Inquisition of the 13th century, the pope banned it for over 50 years, along with Aristotle's other works on Nature, from being taught at the University of Paris. It was this work that Aquinas was sequestered for so many years with the mission of reconciling it with church dogma. They are irreconcilable, contraries, for the reason that Aristotle was against Plato.

What Aristotle discusses as simply matter of fact then regarding the views on this subject of the pre-Socratics, Socrates, and Plato, now places him as one of the best historians of them. Much of what we know about the other philosophers thoughts, especially Plato's, are detailed by Aristotle. The method at the onset of First Philosophy is dialectical deduction, beginning with the most reputable opinions and then proceeding to either affirm or deny them by deduction. Aristotle wrote, edited, and added chapters to Topics (the methodology and study of dialectical deductions) over the course of 13 years (age 31 to 44). First Philosophy began 8 years later and took 5 years to complete. As best I can tell, this was his last major work.

My take presented here is the most recent and I consider it the best one based on content alone. The focus has always been on the principles used to deny his contemporaries conclusions and to affirm his own. These are found in the first several parts of the work and when applied to other parts later in the work it appears that key themes later claimed were grossly mistranslated or are outright insertions.

Cover: Archimedes Thoughtful by Domenico Fetti
Recommended reading for tributary facts about Aristotle and his works: The Aristotle Adventure by Burgess Laughlin.

Victor Hugo's description from The Toilers of the Sea.

00:00 The Interior of an Abyss Illuminated
09:30 The Unexpected Intervenes

Victor Hugo's description from Toilers of The Sea.

00:00 A Man Who is Hungry is Not the Only Hungry One
03:49 The Monster
12:19 Another Form of Combat in the Gulf

00:03:21 POLITICS (alternate version I regard as secondary)
00:29:19 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS (abbreviated)
00:48:25 FIRST PHILOSOPHY
NE is abbreviated here since this take was about getting these alternate passages from Politics recorded. I regard this presentation of Politics as secondary to the other takes and not recommended until after the primary take is understood. The purpose in this secondary take is to present the introduction to Politics, pertaining to rulers, subjects, and the nature of communities and states, outside of the modern Academics view who focus too much on Book 1 and a condition that is presently non-existent. Academics say little of the later themes in Politics such as the corruption of politics by money and special interests, the supremacy of the middle class, the variations of oligarchy and democracy, the union of these two, constitutional governance, the nature of tyrants, and above all that ethics begets politics, or, prezactly, politics IS ethics. The soul of Aristotle's Politics is Book 7, of which none of that is in this take. I recommend reading Politics deductively, Book 7 first and 1 last (Book 8 as addendum).

NE is abbreviated because I went into that and FP unexpectedly and was 'cold' after several months out of thought. I forgot the leads and turns I use to guide me along. Since it is incomplete here, then, this presentation of NE is also not recommended for someone visiting this site without hearing the complete version in other takes. Likewise, I would not recommend that anyone interested in Aristotle's Ethics study the Nicomachean lecture (named after his son) without also studying the Eudemian lecture (named after his daughter). Eudemian Ethics is eschewed by Academics since it gives the more scathing critique of Plato's theory of the Ideas. Academics both of a classical and progressive ilk, although they like to claim they are vastly different from one another, rest upon the same fundamental principle; their allegiance to Plato's Ideas. This invariably leads them both to the same end; the common bad, stealing by law.

00:02:01 EUDEMIAN ETHICS
00:28:30 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
01:17:11 POLITICS
01:53:10 FIRST PHILOSOPHY

Whenever we have knowledge and understand what any thing is we have also come to learn its contrary.

00:02:33 EUDEMIAN ETHICS
00:27:25 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
01:14:40 POLITICS
01:47:57 FIRST PHILOSOPHY

Money, by its principle (for that for the sake of which it is), is the re-presentation of work. It later becomes administered by law and it is in our power to change it and make it useless. A law can ruin any activity.

00:17 Categories
02:54 Interpretation
04:15 Prior Analytics
07:41 Posterior Analytics
21:04 Topics
23:34 Sophistical Refutations
24:46 First Philosophy
Excerpted from THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ARISTOTLE, The Revised Oxford Translation edited by Jonathan Barnes, sixth printing dated 1995. Any typing errors are mine.

SHOW MORE

Created 3 years ago.

20 videos

Category Science & Technology

Of two contraries, one is to be chosen and the other avoided.