Dick_O_Rosary

Dick_O_Rosary

I couldn't stop laughing

This is from the finale of the second season of The Grand Tour. Please let me know if you want me to upload the entire series in the comments below.

Binge watch Season 1 (eps 6-10) of the critically acclaimed Mr. Robot.

Upload Description:

Binge watch the first five episodes of Season 1 of Mr. Robot with this upload.

Series Description:

Elliot, a brilliant but highly unstable young cyber-security engineer and vigilante hacker, becomes a key figure in a complex game of global dominance when he and his shadowy allies try to take down the corrupt corporation he works for.

Episode List:

Episode 1 - "eps1.0 hellofriend.mov"
Episode 2 - "eps1.1_ones-and-zer0es.mpeg" ; Starts at: 1:04:56
Episode 3 - "eps1.2_d3bug.mkv" ; Starts at:1:51:58
Episode 4 - "eps1.3_da3m0ns.mp4" ; Starts at: 2:37:02
Episode 5 - "eps1.4_3xpl0its.wmv" ; Starts at: 3:22:03

Elliot would have been very happy to be on BitChute. :)

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Depiction of the Wannsee Conference on January 20, 1942.

Starring Kenneth Branagh as Reinhard Heydrich and Stanley Tucci as Adolf Eichmann.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0266425/

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

Bartender follows the nightlife of Ryū Sasakura (佐々倉 溜 Sasakura Ryū), a bartending prodigy who is said to mix the best cocktails anyone has ever tasted. Upon returning from his studies in France, Ryū works as an assistant for a senior bartender at the bar Lapin. He later opened his own bar, the Eden Hall (イーデンホール Īden Hōru), which is hidden in a nook of the Ginza district in downtown Tokyo. Rumor holds that potential patrons cannot simply find and enter Eden Hall; rather they must be invited in by the host. Sasakura is known to serve the "Glass of the Gods" (神のグラス Kami no Gurasu), a way of saying that he knows just the right drink to serve in a particular situation.

The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English language presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English.

Episode 7

British trade and colonisation spread the English language. In India, scholar William Jones finds some English words already present in Sanskrit. Convicts land in Australia, blending London criminal slang and Aboriginal words into a new dialect. Jamaicans reclaim patois.

The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English language presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English.

Episode 8

Today, English is a worldwide language. What is its future? Could it end up like Latin?

The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English language presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English.

Episode 6

The Age of Reason began, and English scholars of mathematics and science like Isaac Newton started publishing their books in English instead of Latin. Jonathan Swift would attempt to save the English language from perpetual change, followed by Samuel Johnson who would write the A Dictionary of the English Language, made up of 43,000 words and definitions, written in seven years and published in 1755.

Though the upper and lower classes found no reason to change or improve their grammar, the middle class used it to their advantage in joining polite society. William Cobbett, a son of the lower middle class and writer of Rural Rides, advising those who wish to rise above their station that writing and speaking properly was essential.

As English began to replace Gaelic in Scotland it took on its own character, using "bonnie" from the French "bon" and "kolf" from the Dutch for "club", the probable origin for "golf". Several other words came from Gaelic, including "ceilidh", "glen", "loch", and "whisky". Pronunciation became an issue all over the United Kingdom, as some sounds could be spelt in several different ways, while one spelling could have several articulations. Irish actor Thomas Sheridan wrote British Education, a book that attempted to educate all English speakers in the proper pronunciation of words. However, some Scots were offended that their speech might be considered second-class and the Scottish poet Robert Burns, son of a poor farmer, became the hero of the Scottish language. William Wordsworth also became a champion of the ordinary peoples' English, suggesting that poetry need not be written using haughty vocabulary.

The turn of the 19th century marked a period when women were more educated and their speech and literacy improved. Novels were thought to be a frivolous occupation for females until Jane Austen wrote about the capabilities of such works in her own novels; her works were highly proper, often using words like "agreeable", "appropriate", "discretion", and "propriety".

Then came the Industrial Revolution and the language that came along with it. The steam engine changed the meaning of words like "train", "locomotive", and "tracks" to be associated with the new technology. Along with this age came a change of social situation; the term "slum" came into use, and Cockney rhyming slang became a new form of speech for those in the lower class.

The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English language presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English.

Episode 5

Upon landing in North America, settlers encountered Squanto, a native man who had been captured and brought to England to learn English and become a guide. After escaping, Squanto returned to his tribe, which happened to live near the place that the English settlers had created their small village. Among shockingly few other words, the settlers adopted "skunk" and "squash" into their vocabulary from the local language, making clear that they meant to impose their own culture, rather than adopt any other.

English began to change, not only in meaning, with "shops" becoming "stores", but also with the variety of accents becoming considerably less in number than in England. In the last 18th and early 19th centuries, Noah Webster wrote what was known as the American Spelling Book, or the Blue Backed Speller, which would become one of the most influential books in the history of the English language, Webster's Dictionary. This dictionary created simpler spellings, eliminating the "u" in words like "colour" and "honour", reducing "axe" to "ax" and reducing double letters to single ones, like in the word "traveller", now spelt "traveler" in the United States. Words with "-re" endings became "-er", and other spellings changed include "defence", which became "defense". Some words that England had dropped were kept in by Americans, such as "deft", "scant", "talented", "likely", and "fall" instead of the newer "autumn".

Two-thousand words were created in journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition toward the West, including "rapids", which came from the adjective "rapid". New words to the English language, such as "hickory", "moose", "pecan", and "toboggan" are derived from Indigenous languages. "There are hundreds of names made by combining existing English words," states Bragg, such as "black bear", "bullfrog", "blue jay", and "rednecks", who got their name from the sunburned necks they got from working in the fields. Rednecks couldn't afford steamboat fare, they travelled the water on rafts, using paddles called riffs, and they became known as the "riffraff."

Alcohol also added a great deal of words to the English language, "bootlegging" referred to hiding a flat bottle of alcohol in the leg of a boot. "And there were literally hundreds of terms for drunk," says Bragg. "Benjamin Franklin listed 229 of them minted in America, including... 'He's wamble-cropped,' 'He's halfway to concord,' 'He's ate a toad and a half for breakfast,' 'He's groatable,' 'He's globular,' [and] 'He's loose in the hilts.'"

Irish settlers brought words and expressions like "smithereens", "speakeasy", "Yes, indeedy", and "No, sirree".

Joseph McCoy had the idea to drive his cattle to trains and sell them to the Eastern states, creating a new meaning for the word "cowboy", and he made a lot of money in the process. Because of this, travellers would sometimes introduce themselves with his name, and in turn, he began to introduce himself as "the real McCoy".

The Gullah language is a mixture of English and other languages that is thought to be the closest to the one that slaves, brought over from various countries in West Africa and the Caribbean, spoke in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Words like "banana", "zebra", "gorilla", "samba", and "banjo" were incorporated into English from the slaves living on plantations. The stripped-down grammar used in variations of English, like Gullah, is common when different languages come together. However, slave-owners took this to mean that they had lesser intelligence, when in reality their slaves were ultimately contributing words to the English language.

The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English language presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English.

Episode 4

In Queen Elizabeth I's time, English began to expand to even greater depths. Overseas trade brought new words from France, as well as the now popular swearwords "fokkinge" (fucking), "krappe" (crap), and "bugger" from Dutch, in the 16th century. Sailors also brought all kinds of produce like apricots, bananas, limes, yams, cocoa, potatoes, port wine from Spain and Portugal, chocolate and tomatoes from France as well words from 50 other languages including "coffee", "magazine", and "alcohol" from Arabic countries.

"The decade on either side of the year 1600 saw thousands of Latin words come into the English vocabulary of educated people, words like 'excavate,' 'horrid,' 'radius,' 'cautionary,' 'pathetic,' 'pungent,' 'frugal' [...]," states Bragg in this episode. The Inkhorn Controversy, a debate about the English language and where its new words should come from, soon followed. A few scholars, including John Cheke, wished that the language should not use Latin or Greek words to expand the English vocabulary, but rather Anglo-Saxon ones.

English eventually obtained its own dictionary. Eight years before Italian and 35 years before French. However, this is a huge difference from the Arabic dictionary, which was made 800 years before and the Sanskrit, which was created nearly 1000 years before the English.

Scholar Katherine Duncan-Jones informs on poet, courtier, and soldier Philip Sidney, who also had a large impact on the English language, introducing phrases like "my better half", "far-fetched", and words such as "conversation", which had previously had another meaning.

William Shakespeare's contribution to the English vocabulary is one of the most famous. Over 2000 words used in modern English were first recorded in his writing, words such as "leapfrog", "assassination", "courtship", and "indistinguishable". Shakespeare's vocabulary included over 21,000 words, his plays translated into 50 different languages, and Bragg states, "The Oxford English dictionary lists a stunning 33,000 Shakespeare quotations."

Mankind takes on godlike powers: to feed billions of people, reshape the landscape, re-engineer the human body. However, World War II devastated the human population. Amidst the chaos, Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan create massive empires across Europe and Asia. The United builds roads in Alaska. The greatest power of all was unleashed over Hiroshima on August 6th 1945. The Civil Rights movement takes place in the 1960's. Since entering the Atomic Age we've been living between eternity and oblivion. But at the same time, we've become more connected as a species. 100,000 years ago there were a few thousand hunter-gatherers on the African savannah. Today there are 7 billion of us in every corner of the globe. It's been an amazing journey.

The end of the Civil War allows Mankind to go into overdrive. This is an age of innovation, transformation and mass production. People believe that "Anything, everything, is possible." Japan goes from feudal society to industrial superpower within 50 years. But progress has its dark side. The demand for rubber devastates Africa. And the desire to build bigger, faster, better leads to a titanic disaster.

Two great revolutions entwine. The American Revolution inspires dreams of political and personal liberty. The Industrial Revolution replaces muscle power with machines, freeing Mankind from nature's limits. But our oldest foe–disease–thrives in industrial cities. With the American Civil War, the two revolutions collide. The world's first industrial war, it is a battle to define "freedom."

The Aztecs have built a mighty empire that dominates Central America. But it will be destroyed because of a domino effect. 7,000 miles away in modern-day Turkey, the great trading center of Constantinople is overrun by an Islamic army. Europeans race to find a new route to the spice-rich East. Instead, Christopher Columbus lands in America–and discovers gold. Within 30 years the Aztecs will be conquered.

Mankind embarks on a new age of exploration and tames the wilderness. In North America, Siberia and Australia ancient traditions are swept away in the name of commerce and science. Within a hundred years, the irrational fear that produced a witch trial in Salem gives way to a very rational cry for freedom. American revolutionaries confront a mighty empire. The battle for the modern world begins.

In the Andes, the Spanish open up the largest silver mine in the world and mint millions of pesos de ocho (pieces of eight). These coins transform the global economy. They fill the treasure chests of pirates. They fuel a stock market boom and help pay for the Taj Mahal. As trade booms, millions of people come to the New World as slaves. But a handful of Pilgrims come as pioneers looking for freedom.

Gold from Africa kickstarts the rebirth of Europe. Money flows into Venice–creating new opportunities for entrepreneurs willing to take risks. In China, a new weapon–the gun–allows a peasant uprising to unify the country. Chinese innovations inspire Europe–leading to the printing press. Millions of books are printed. One of them will inspire a journey to the New World. America beckons.

Genghis Khan–the bloodiest warlord in history–sweeps south from Mongolia into China and creates a mighty empire. He leaves 40 million dead bodies in his wake. But a greater killer stalks Mankind–the Plague. Traveling along Mongol trade routes, the disease wreaks havoc in Asia and Europe–the greatest biological disaster in history. But the Americas are unaffected. Here, civilizations flourish in isolation.

When Rome is sacked by barbarians, Europe enters a Dark Age. But from the fringes of the old empire, two new forces remake the world. The Arabs, funded by a gold rush, unite under the banner of Islam. The Vikings rejuvenate the cities of Europe, travel to America and become Christian knights. The stage is now set for a clash of civilizations–the Crusades.

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Created 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

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CategoryPeople & Family

The videos I uploaded have been compressed and made low resolution for the purpose of speed of delivery and economy of data use and bandwidth. I apologize in advance if they are too low res for your liking, but I need you to understand that I am one of those poor souls suffering under a data cap and limited bandwidth. I also didn't want to unnecessarily tax Bitchute's servers as I understand that they are not yet up to scale.

Check out my playlists:

Mankind: The Story of All of Us: https://www.bitchute.com/playlist/o5bfpb5pxme1/
The Adventure of English: https://www.bitchute.com/playlist/YQ4AqUDXSnMK/
Bartender (Anime): https://www.bitchute.com/playlist/9do17Ig6pTj8/