Dpoppie

Dpoppie

Dpoppie

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If I were to ask the question, "What should you put in each chapter of your book?" you might look at me sideways. Finding out what to put in each of your chapters is easy to most writers. But this question is important. When you write a work of fiction, you start with nothing. Though you are constrained by a few things, such as the language you write in, the world is open to you. The story you can tell can go millions of different ways. Combinations are endless. As you develop your ideas for the story develop, you limit the possibilities for what you can put in your story, but the process of writing can still be full of unneeded information. What information is important to put in the larger sections of your book? What are the scenes that you need to put in to convey the experience you are trying to convey? On today's episode of How to Write Good, I am going to be talking about how to can look at chapters so you can find how best to use each one.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on paragraphs:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/VZsIl1VYn5vh/

My episode on outlining:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/fCpvs1vxbqyO/

My episode on the Seven Point Plot Structure:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/tMXU4BRgsvXH/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

I enjoy writing the first draft of my book. It is an opportunity to dive into something new. It is an opportunity to explore the thing that I have been daydreaming about in me head for the last few months (and in some cases, years). First drafts are fun to me. One of the reasons they are fun to me is because I write them so quickly. But editing. . . Editing can be a bit of a drag because I am trying to make all the mess of my first draft work. I am trying to get my book to that final polished state, and it is hard sitting in front of a computer screen to decide how I am going to change that huge over 100k typed document. One thing that has really helped me in my editing process is to not see editing as editing. I have shifted to see editing as writing. And I think you should too.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on editing:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/Tqq2BkA7ElSi/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Story structure is important. Each story must follow the structure of a story. To understand what stories are, people have developed story structures that we can use to understand and develop stories. You have probably heard about the three act story. You have probably heard about the five act story. It is less likely that you have heard of the seven point story structure. On today's episode of How to Write Good, we are going to be talking about that final story structure, seven point story structure.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episodes about story structure:
https://www.spreaker.com/episode/34472702
https://www.spreaker.com/episode/34164769

My episode on hooks:
https://www.spreaker.com/episode/32625139

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

There are a lot of different ways you can go about planning a story. Some people are pantsers. Some people are plotters. If you are a pantser, I would encourage you to do some plotting. When we go about planning, we have several different ways to go about planning. People have set up several different structures on how stories work. One of my favorite is the five act story structure. Shakespeare also used this.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode talking about the beginning, middle, and end:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/nEAAzxcbqlNv/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

The protagonist of the story creates the core of a story. You look through that character’s eyes to write. You watch as that character acts in the world. The way that character moves through the world and how it ends up is what we are watching. It is that which makes up the story that pushes us to the edge of our seat. But a story is not just made up of the main character. It is made of places. It is made of events. And it is made of side characters. One of the most interesting parts of a story are the side characters. The side characters, of course, are not the main character, so we do not build these characters in the same way as the main character. How do we do that?

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on developing a character:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/Ymg6VXh4ijR7/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

We have talked about how to start the book. We have talked about the different parts of the book. Some people will point to one of these two aspects as the most important part of a story. I do not know if I would go so far. I am not a person who tends to point to one aspect of a story to say it is the most important. I think there is danger doing that for any writer.
One of the areas I have not talked about yet is the ending of a book. If we can write the beginning and we can write the middle, what do we do with the end, especially the very end? I have had trouble understanding when to end. I am sure others have had trouble figuring out when to end. I think one of the most important things to know when writing endings is what they are supposed to be doing. If you can understand the purpose of an ending, I think you can write an ending.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on the Beginning, Middle, and End:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/nEAAzxcbqlNv/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

I love dialogue. It is one of my favorite things to write. I am not sure of the entire reason behind that. I think part of it is because all fiction writing seems to direct itself toward dialogue, meaning that it is usually some sort of dialogue that creates the climax of the story. Another reason I love dialogue is because it has never been something difficult for me. It has been something very natural, and I have found it to be the case that dialogue flows into my mind without the need to try very hard. Recently, I have learned that this isn’t the case for everyone. So, on today’s episode of How to Write Good, I am going to be talking about how I approach dialogue and why I think you learn to write it as easily as anything else.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Every story has three parts, and these three parts have been known to exist for thousands of yours. These three parts are beginning, a middle, and an end. Aristotle said that these were the three parts of a story, and I think that these three parts are the most basic sections we can break a story into. This is not without good reason. Each of these parts is distinct from the others, but each must exist to create a full story.
On today’s episode of How to Write Good, I am going to be talking about these three different parts and how they function in a story.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My other episodes where I talk about the beginning of stories:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/99dr7Rs3JM3y/

An Easy Way to Plot your Book:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/fCpvs1vxbqyO/

Other Episodes to check out:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/4HZxK1kBQP52/
https://www.bitchute.com/video/0xVxC5NeQOlu/
https://www.bitchute.com/video/YlBPn0BS0Olq/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Have you ever read a book that was written so well that made you cry? I mean one of those books that is written so well, you realize you're a slob who is never going to make it in life, so you buy yourself three gallons of ice-cream, four bags of chips, and fourteen pounds of SlimJims, and you slip into a bath of your own hot tears and lament that you were born with an inferior understanding of the English language? What I mean is that you run across one of those writers who takes away the need for virtual reality and somehow makes it so that you are actually immersed in the world and story they have created? What if you could start your journey toward being one of those writers?
On Today's episode, I am going to be talking about how to write in a way that reflects how people experience things. This is the type of writing is the kind that is going to allow your readers to be plunged into what you are trying to convey.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

I have been writing for almost two decades. When it comes to beginnings and endings, I rarely can come up with something that works on the first try. This is especially the case for beginnings. When you open a book, you want to make the reader feel obligated to read the rest of the book. Not as if you are threatening them though. You want them to like the beginning of the book so much that they have a need to read the rest. How do we begin then? How can we look at beginnings so that we bring about that result? I am not here to tell you there is a silver bullet. I do not think there is ever a silver bullet in writing. I do not thinking you are lucky to catch lightning in a bottle. I do not think good books are based on luck. They are based on craft, patience, hard-work, the ingenuity of the author, etc. . . And because they are not based on luck, I actually think you can shift your mindset to find better ways to write. In this episode, I am going to talk about what I have found to be the most useful way to look at the beginning of your book.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on narrowing your writing scope:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/NRW7aoB0K7AL/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

What is your favorite part of writing? One of my favorite parts is planning the book. I also like the first draft, but one of the areas I do not like as much is editing. Editing can be the worst, because by the time you get to editing, you have already written the entire book. You feel something psychological that says you are done, but you have only just begun the process. I have heard from a lot of people that their least favorite part of writing is editing (which really sucks for them, because I think it might be the longest part). Today, I am going to be talking about a way to shift your mindset toward editing. Maybe if you do, you'll even learn to like the process.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

One more day left until the release of "A Cur for Death" on August 1st (Saturday). In this short video, I talk how people answered my survey about why they read, I talk more about the bigger picture of this series, and I reveal the cover of the book.

Mark Twain (AKA Samuel Clemens) famously wrote in a letter that he would have made the letter shorter, but he did not have the time. Mr. Twain understood that writing did not require every little detail of every little thing to be explained. He actually understood that good write was succinct. It does not waste the readers time. If it needs to take longer to explain something, it has a reason for doing so. Good writing always has a pay-off. In this episode, I talk about how to focus your writing so you are not writing every piece of every little thing. I do not need to know what characters are eating in most cases. I do not need to know how many hairs are sprouting out of a person's nose (Unless it is a woman. That might be very important information for character development). I need to hone in on those things that are important. And I do that not by focus on the huge things but on the small ones.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

The Two Episodes you could listen to:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/VZsIl1VYn5vh/
https://www.bitchute.com/video/1As9eW9q3MBO/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

When you write anything, you usually decide on how to write that thing based on how it feels in the world. What is the emotional connection? Does this thing I am writing contain movement? Do I need to describe it in a certain way because the way it expresses itself is temporal? Action is one of these things that looks a certain way in the world, so there seems to be one evident way to write action. You write action step by step through the sequence of events that make up the action. But what if that was not the best way to look at action? What if we could describe action in a way that didn't make us feel like phony writers?
Today on How to Write Good, I am going to talk about a new way to look at action. I think it is a much better way because it maintains the integrity of your writing.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

Episode on how to write things out of your story:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/1As9eW9q3MBO/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

When I first started to write in school, I was taught that each sentence forms a complete thought. This is probably true. When linguists look at talking and writing, they probably say that a sentence is a thought. Even though this might be true, I think you need to shift your attitude about what forms a complete thought in relation to writing. Instead of saying that a sentence is a complete thought, shift your paradigm to understand your most basic unit of writing as a paragraph. That might sound like something weird, but I think this is something that will help you write better. In this episode, I intend to convince you that this is the way you should write.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on dialogue:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/azysW8wP5FDT/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Character motivation and character goals are not the same thing. If you haven't check out my episode on why that is the case, you should check it out. I think it is very important to know the differences between these two things because motivation can help make your writing and story very interesting. Because of this, I would like to dive into character motivation more. It can be a very complex thing within a story. It can be something that makes your story wholly unique, and though you may be able to get away with only having character goals, I think you should seriously consider developing your character's motivation as well.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Episode on Character Goals and Motivation:
https://www.spreaker.com/episode/32433487

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

It is only five more days until the first book of my mystery series is being released. In this video, I go over my approach to writing, why I chose to write a book like this one, and a little bit about the book.

Tension is something within writing that I do not think exists on its face. I think writing requires an audience. A person needs to understand and connect to the story, and when the right person reads a piece of text, that person is able to understand the tension in the story. The writing does need to exist for the tension in the writing to exist (of course), but it is a requirement for tension to exist. Today, I am going to be talking about tension. What is tension? Why do we need tension? How does tension work in the story? How do we create tension in our story?

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My other episode about Tension:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/t4DMELSzUBGi/

My Episode on Goals and Motivation:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/JUVmOVVuTt0J/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

One of the things I learned about in school was the necessity of having transitions in my writing. If I did not have transitions, my writing would not flow. If my writing did not flow, people would not like my writing. If people did not like my writing, they would not like me. And if they decided they would not like me, they would flick cartons of old milk at my head. So, when I was younger, it was almost an imperative to make sure I used transitions because if I did not, the day would be both soggy and smelly. What I have learned since then is that the goal of good writing is to rarely if ever use transition words. But you do not jump from transition words to not using transition words. You need to develop a style of writing that supports omitting those transition words. Today on How to Write Good, I am going to be talking about the mindset you need to adopt so that you can get rid of those transition words.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Writing only consists of what is on the page, but it doesn't, but it does, but it doesn't. If you have ever thought about what writing is, you probably have realized that it is a very complex process. Speech is a complex process in and of itself, but writing goes beyond speech. It follows after speech. What I mean by that is it takes on the pattern of speech, but it is tweaking that pattern to fit into the new format of writing. When we approach writing, we often think that if we put things on the page in as clear a way as possible we will end up with good writing, but good writing is more complex than that. Good writing is not just the words on the page. Good writing is the interplay of the words with the person reading the words. This means that you do not have to convey every little detail of a thing for a reader to understand, and in a lot of cases, you shouold not.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

Other Episodes about writing that you can check out:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/ivf6ayO9aaOR/
https://www.bitchute.com/video/XYwA8W4Hc1u1/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

Something things in writing are boring. I find copy-editing boring. Formatting is not that fun either. Neither is sending out queries to agents. Some of you may find outlining a boring part of the book, and some of you may find outlining so boring you have labelled it as useless so you do not even do it (Because we all know that there can be no other reason for why you do not outline a book).
When I think about outlining a book, I do not think most people have trouble with the process. You come up with a framework. You fill out that framework. Some people write paragraphs for their outline. Some people make it look like an outline. I do not think there is a wrong format to do outlines in, but I do think that outlining does have a logical flow. In this episode of How to Write Good, I am going to be going through the different steps of how I outline, and I am going to be explaining why I think this process makes the most sense and how it will save you time, heartache, and effort.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My episode on why I think you should outline:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/t6CjEBuVXznA/

My episodes on generating ideas:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/4HZxK1kBQP52/
https://www.bitchute.com/video/0xVxC5NeQOlu/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

What is a hook? It is a thing at the beginning of a book that grabs the readers attention and makes him want to read more. A hook can be dropping the reader right into the action. It can be a quick snippet of dialogue. It can be a description, or an aphorism, or a bizarre statement, or an alliteration, or an introduction of the main character: "Call me Ishmael." If you are a reader, you've seen hundreds of different book openings. Some have been bad. Some have been alright. Some have been so good that you could not help yourself but continue the book.
But what if everything you knew about hooks was incorrect? What if you've been lied to your whole entire writing career, and you should look at hooks in a different way. Today, I am going to be talking about why you should change your views on hooks in books. There is a better way to use them, and you are going to thank me.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

I am writing six books over six months. I have just finished my final edit of my first book. I you would like to know more about this project, you can watch this video.

If you want to sign up for my newsletter:
danielpoppie.com/newsletter

There are two types of writers. We call these two different groups of writers "pantsers" and "plotters" (You may call these something else, but we all fall into one of these two groups). Pansters do little to no planning. They have a general sense of where they are going, and they feel their way through the plot as they write. Plotters plot. In general, this second group does extensive planning. They develop scenes. They develop characters. They develop little intricacies of the plot, and they generally know exactly where their story is going to end.
Should you pants? Should you plot? I think that one direction is superior to the other, and it is not without reason.

My Book:
https://amzn.to/31UI7Zg

My Newsletter:
https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/a1r2k2

One of my episodes on characters:
https://www.bitchute.com/video/oNz71moolscp/

My Website:
www.danielpoppie.com

HTWG Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/howtowritegood

HTWG Twitter:
https://twitter.com/danielpoppie

HTWG Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/howtowritegood

One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet:
https://www.spreaker.com/show/one-last-toast-for-ebenezer-fleet

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Created 1 year, 2 months ago.

86 videos

CategoryArts & Literature

Author, Podcaster, your long lost father.
My podcast is about writing: How to Write Good
Check out my serialized novel here on Bitchute: One Last Toast for Ebenezer Fleet
Check out my book on Amazon: The Ninth Hour