Music Videos of the World

Music Videos of the World

The 5th Dimension is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire includes pop, R&B, soul, jazz, light opera and Broadway—the melange was coined as "Champagne Soul."

Formed as The Versatiles in late 1965, the group changed its name to the hipper "The 5th Dimension" by 1966. They became well-known during the late 1960s and early 1970s for their popular hits: "Up, Up and Away", "Stoned Soul Picnic", "Medley: Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)", "Wedding Bell Blues", "Never My Love", "One Less Bell to Answer", "(Last Night) I Didn't Get to Sleep at All", and The Magic Garden LP.

The five original members were Billy Davis Jr., Florence LaRue, Marilyn McCoo, Lamonte McLemore, and Ronald Townson. They have recorded for several labels over their long careers. Their first work appeared on the Soul City label, which was started by Imperial Records/United Artists Records recording artist Johnny Rivers. The group later recorded for Bell/Arista Records, ABC Records, and Motown Records.

Some of the songwriters popularized by the 5th Dimension went on to careers of their own, especially Ashford & Simpson, who wrote "California Soul". The group is also notable for having more success with the songs of Laura Nyro than Nyro did herself, particularly with "Stoned Soul Picnic", "Sweet Blindness", "Wedding Bell Blues", "Blowin' Away", and "Save the Country". The group also recorded songs by well-known songwriters such as "One Less Bell to Answer", written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and the songs and music of Jimmy Webb, who wrote their hit "Up, Up and Away." The group recorded an album composed almost entirely of Webb songs called The Magic Garden.

The 5th Dimension's famed producer, Bones Howe, used Bob Alcivar as the singers' vocal arranger, as well as The Wrecking Crew, a renowned group of studio musicians including drummer Hal Blaine, for their recording sessions.

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Henry John Deutschendorf Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer-songwriter, record producer, actor, activist, and humanitarian, whose greatest commercial success was as a solo singer. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career with folk music groups during the late 1960s.[3] Starting in the 1970s, he was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the decade and one of its best-selling artists.[4] By 1974, he was firmly established as one of America's best-selling performers, and AllMusic has described Denver as "among the most beloved entertainers of his era".[5]

Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed, with total sales of over 33 million records worldwide.[6] He recorded and performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his disdain for city life, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver's music appeared on a variety of charts, including country music, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs "Take Me Home, Country Roads", "Annie's Song", "Rocky Mountain High", "Calypso", "Thank God I'm a Country Boy", and "Sunshine on My Shoulders".

Denver appeared in several films and television specials during the 1970s and 1980s. He continued to record in the 1990s, also focusing on environmental issues by lending vocal support to space exploration and testifying in front of Congress in protest against censorship in music. He lived in Aspen, Colorado, for much of his life and was known for his love of Colorado, which he sang about numerous times. In 1974, Denver was named poet laureate of the state. The Colorado state legislature also adopted "Rocky Mountain High" as one of its two state songs in 2007.

Denver was an avid pilot who died aged 53 in a single-fatality crash while flying his experimental Rutan Long-EZ canard aircraft.

http://johndenver.com/

Cass Elliot (born Ellen Naomi Cohen; September 19, 1941 – July 29, 1974), also known as Mama Cass, was an American singer and actress, best known as a member of the Mamas & the Papas. After the group broke up, she released five solo albums. In 1998 she was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for her work with the Mamas & the Papas.[1]

The Mamas & the Papas

With two female members, the New Journeymen needed a new name. According to Doherty, Elliot had the inspiration for the band's new name; as written on his website:

We're all just lying around vegging out watching TV and discussing names for the group. The New Journeymen was not a handle that was going to hang on this outfit. John was pushing for the Magic Cyrcle. Eech, but none of us could come up with anything better, then we switch the channel and, hey, it's the Hells Angels on the Carson show... And the first thing we hear is: "Now hold on there, Hoss. Some people call our women cheap, but we just call them our Mamas." Cass jumped up: "Yeah! I want to be a Mama." And Michelle is going: "We're the Mamas! We're the Mamas!" OK. I look at John. He's looking at me going: "The Papas?" Problem solved. A toast! To the Mamas and the Papas. Well, after many, many toasts, Cass and John are passed out."[12]

https://web.archive.org/web/20080123085211/http://www.casselliot.com/index.htm

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Stephen Lawrence Winwood (born 12 May 1948) is an English rock musician whose genres include progressive rock, blue-eyed soul, rhythm and blues, blues rock, pop rock, and jazz. Though primarily a vocalist and keyboardist, Winwood also plays bass guitar, drums, acoustic and electric guitar, mandolin, violin, and other strings.

Winwood was a key member of The Spencer Davis Group, Traffic, Blind Faith and Go. He also had a successful solo career with hits including "While You See a Chance", "Valerie", "Back in the High Life Again" and two US Billboard Hot 100 number ones: "Higher Love" and "Roll with It". He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Traffic in 2004.[1]

In 2005, Winwood was honoured as a BMI Icon at the annual BMI London Awards for his "enduring influence on generations of music makers".[2] In 2008, Rolling Stone ranked Winwood No. 33 in its 100 Greatest Singers of All Time.[3] Winwood has won two Grammy Awards. He was nominated twice for a Brit Award for Best British Male Artist: 1988 and 1989.[4][5] In 2011 he received the Ivor Novello Award from the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors for Outstanding Song Collection.[6]

http://stevewinwood.com/

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Joan Elizabeth Osborne (born July 8, 1962) is an American singer, songwriter, and interpreter of music, having recorded and performed in various popular American musical genres including pop, soul, R&B, blues, and country.[1] She is best known for her recording of the Eric Bazilian song "One of Us". She has toured with Motown sidemen the Funk Brothers and was featured in the documentary film about them, Standing in the Shadows of Motown.

Originally from Anchorage, Kentucky, a suburb of Louisville, Osborne moved to New York City in the late 1980s, where she formed her own record label, Womanly Hips, to release a few independent recordings. She signed with Mercury Records, and released her first full-length album, Soul Show: Live at Delta 88, in 1991. Her second (and first major label) album was Relish (1995), which became a hit on the strength of the single "One of Us". "Right Hand Man" and "St. Teresa" were minor hits, and "Spider Web" also received radio play. Osborne is bisexual.[2] Her song "After Jane", on the album Pretty Little Stranger, touches on this as it is about a relationship between herself and a woman.

In 2001, Osborne appeared on Austin City Limits, singing material mainly from Righteous Love. In a brief interview segment at the end of the episode, Osborne reflects on her gladness to have gotten out of the limelight of her mid-'90s stardom. She was featured in the 2002 documentary film, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and toured with Motown sidemen the Funk Brothers. She and her band accompanied the Dixie Chicks for a national tour in the summer of 2003, during which time she also joined veteran San Francisco jam-rockers The Dead as a vocalist, and released her fourth album, titled How Sweet It Is, a collection of classic rock and soul covers.

During 2005 and 2006, Osborne performed on numerous occasions with Phil Lesh and Friends. Her vocals were featured prominently on the album Live at the Warfield. She continues to make appearances with the band.

In February 2007, she appeared on the Grand Ole Opry. In May 2007, she issued Breakfast in Bed produced by Tor Hyams, a return to the soul music that she had covered on How Sweet It Is. Breakfast in Bed also featured the two songs ("Heatwave" and "What Becomes of the Brokenhearted") that she had covered for the film Standing in the Shadows of Motown. The same year, Osborne appeared as a featured guest in the third season of the Transatlantic Sessions television series, performing "Saint Teresa", "Holy Water", and "Please Don't Tell Me How the Story Ends".

Osborne sang lead vocals on the cover of the Willie Dixon-penned "Spoonful" on Vivian Campbell's solo album Two Sides of If. She also provided some vocals for "Wayfaring Stranger" on Spearhead's 1997 album Chocolate Supa Highway. She covered Dolly Parton's "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on the 2003 tribute album Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton. She is featured on the Holmes Brothers 2007 collection State of Grace performing "Those Memories of You", an old Alan O'Bryant bluegrass tune. Her album, Little Wild One, was released in September 2008. Osborne performs as a guest vocalist on Sgt. Pepper Live, the 2009 album and DVD by Cheap Trick. In 2010, she was awarded the Woman of Achievement Award from Women's Project Theater.[3] She performed with The Waybacks at Merlefest, 2011, during the Hillside Album hour, featuring The Allman Brothers' Eat a Peach.

Her album Bring It On Home was released on March 27, 2012.[4] It is a collection of vintage blues and soul covers, and it received a 2013 Grammy Awards nomination for Best Blues Album. In September 2012, Osborne was featured in a campaign called "30 Songs / 30 Days" to support Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, a multi-platform media project inspired by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's book.[5]

Osborne is currently a member of Trigger Hippy, along with Steve Gorman, Tom Bukovac, Jackie Greene, and Nick Govrik. Trigger Hippy released their debut album on September 30, 2014.[6]

On October 31, 2015, Joan Osborne and Mavis Staples performed in Washington, D.C. at The George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium as part of their Solid Soul Tour.[7]

http://joanosborne.com/

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Joan Elizabeth Osborne (born July 8, 1962) is an American singer, songwriter, and interpreter of music, having recorded and performed in various popular American musical genres including pop, soul, R&B, blues, and country.[1] She is best known for her recording of the Eric Bazilian song "One of Us". She has toured with Motown sidemen the Funk Brothers and was featured in the documentary film about them, Standing in the Shadows of Motown.

Originally from Anchorage, Kentucky, a suburb of Louisville, Osborne moved to New York City in the late 1980s, where she formed her own record label, Womanly Hips, to release a few independent recordings. She signed with Mercury Records, and released her first full-length album, Soul Show: Live at Delta 88, in 1991. Her second (and first major label) album was Relish (1995), which became a hit on the strength of the single "One of Us". "Right Hand Man" and "St. Teresa" were minor hits, and "Spider Web" also received radio play. Osborne is bisexual.[2] Her song "After Jane", on the album Pretty Little Stranger, touches on this as it is about a relationship between herself and a woman.

In 2001, Osborne appeared on Austin City Limits, singing material mainly from Righteous Love. In a brief interview segment at the end of the episode, Osborne reflects on her gladness to have gotten out of the limelight of her mid-'90s stardom. She was featured in the 2002 documentary film, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and toured with Motown sidemen the Funk Brothers. She and her band accompanied the Dixie Chicks for a national tour in the summer of 2003, during which time she also joined veteran San Francisco jam-rockers The Dead as a vocalist, and released her fourth album, titled How Sweet It Is, a collection of classic rock and soul covers.

During 2005 and 2006, Osborne performed on numerous occasions with Phil Lesh and Friends. Her vocals were featured prominently on the album Live at the Warfield. She continues to make appearances with the band.

In February 2007, she appeared on the Grand Ole Opry. In May 2007, she issued Breakfast in Bed produced by Tor Hyams, a return to the soul music that she had covered on How Sweet It Is. Breakfast in Bed also featured the two songs ("Heatwave" and "What Becomes of the Brokenhearted") that she had covered for the film Standing in the Shadows of Motown. The same year, Osborne appeared as a featured guest in the third season of the Transatlantic Sessions television series, performing "Saint Teresa", "Holy Water", and "Please Don't Tell Me How the Story Ends".

Osborne sang lead vocals on the cover of the Willie Dixon-penned "Spoonful" on Vivian Campbell's solo album Two Sides of If. She also provided some vocals for "Wayfaring Stranger" on Spearhead's 1997 album Chocolate Supa Highway. She covered Dolly Parton's "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on the 2003 tribute album Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton. She is featured on the Holmes Brothers 2007 collection State of Grace performing "Those Memories of You", an old Alan O'Bryant bluegrass tune. Her album, Little Wild One, was released in September 2008. Osborne performs as a guest vocalist on Sgt. Pepper Live, the 2009 album and DVD by Cheap Trick. In 2010, she was awarded the Woman of Achievement Award from Women's Project Theater.[3] She performed with The Waybacks at Merlefest, 2011, during the Hillside Album hour, featuring The Allman Brothers' Eat a Peach.

Her album Bring It On Home was released on March 27, 2012.[4] It is a collection of vintage blues and soul covers, and it received a 2013 Grammy Awards nomination for Best Blues Album. In September 2012, Osborne was featured in a campaign called "30 Songs / 30 Days" to support Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, a multi-platform media project inspired by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's book.[5]

Osborne is currently a member of Trigger Hippy, along with Steve Gorman, Tom Bukovac, Jackie Greene, and Nick Govrik. Trigger Hippy released their debut album on September 30, 2014.[6]

On October 31, 2015, Joan Osborne and Mavis Staples performed in Washington, D.C. at The George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium as part of their Solid Soul Tour.[7]

http://joanosborne.com/

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The Raconteurs /ˌrækɒnˈtɜːrz/, also known as The Saboteurs in Australia, is an American rock supergroup that was formed in Detroit, Michigan, featuring four musicians associated with earlier musical projects: Jack White (formerly of The White Stripes, currently The Dead Weather, as well as solo), Brendan Benson (solo), Jack Lawrence (of The Greenhornes, Blanche and The Dead Weather), and Patrick Keeler (also of The Greenhornes).

The band is based in Nashville, Tennessee. According to the band's official website, "The seed was sown in an attic in the middle of a hot summer when friends Jack White and Brendan Benson got together and wrote a song that truly inspired them. This song was 'Steady, As She Goes' and the inspiration led to the creation of a full band with the addition of Lawrence and Keeler." The band came together in Detroit during 2005 and recorded when time allowed for the remainder of the year. Due to the various members' success in other bands, they were quickly dubbed a supergroup. The band, however, asserted they were not, saying that the term implies something pre-planned or temporary, whereas they are actually "a new band made up of old friends."[5]

The band has played a number of music festivals in Europe, Asia, and North America (including Oxegen in Ireland; Reading Festival, Leeds Festival, Glastonbury Festival, and T in the Park in the United Kingdom; Heineken Open'er Festival in Poland; Vegoose in Las Vegas; Lollapalooza in Chicago; Bonnaroo in Manchester, Tennessee; Austin City Limits Music Festival in Austin, Texas; Coachella in Indio, California; and Orlando Calling in Orlando, Florida), headlining many.

http://theraconteurs.com/

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In Spite of Ourselves is the 13th studio album of John Prine, featuring duets with various well-known female folk and alt-country vocalists, released in 1999.

The album was Prine’s first release since successfully battling throat cancer. The female duet partners include Iris DeMent, Connie Smith, Lucinda Williams, Melba Montgomery, Emmylou Harris, Trisha Yearwood, Dolores Keane, Patty Loveless, and his wife, Fiona Prine.

John Prine (born October 10, 1946) is an American country folk singer-songwriter. He has been active as a composer, recording artist, and live performer since the early 1970s, and is known for an often humorous style of country music that has elements of protest and social commentary.

Born and raised in Maywood, Illinois, Prine learned to play the guitar at the age of 14. He attended classes at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music.[1] After serving in West Germany with the U.S. armed forces, he moved to Chicago in the late 1960s, where he worked as a mailman, writing and singing songs as a hobby. Becoming a part of the city's folk revival, he was discovered by Kris Kristofferson, resulting in the production of Prine's self-titled debut album with Atlantic Records in 1971. After receiving critical acclaim, Prine focused on his musical career, recording three more albums for Atlantic. He then signed to Asylum Records, where he recorded an additional three albums.

In 1984 he co-founded Oh Boy Records, an independent record label with which he would release most of his subsequent albums.

After his battle with squamous cell cancer in 1998, Prine's vocals deepened into a gravelly voice, resulting in the award-winning album Fair & Square (2005).

Widely cited as one of the most influential songwriters of his generation, Prine is known for humorous lyrics about love, life, and current events, as well as serious songs with social commentary, or which recollect melancholy tales from his life.

http://www.johnprine.net/

Iris Luella DeMent (born January 5, 1961) is an American two-time Grammy nominated singer and songwriter. DeMent's musical style includes elements of folk, country and gospel.

http://www.irisdement.com/

The poet, vocalist, and songwriter Gil Scott-Heron is both the descendant of the African griots and the forefather of rap. In the early '70s, he boldly proclaimed that "the revolution will not be televised," and in the '80s he warned us of the "New World Order" with his prophetic and satirical single, "B Movie." The gifted filmmaker Robert Mugge filmed the controversial artist in performance at the now-defunct Wax Museum in Washington, D.C., in 1982. Mugge alternates between the electrifying soul/jazz/funk grooves of Scott- Heron's Midnight Band and his witty and deep monologues about racial politics with a wax figure of Uncle Sam and his dead-on commentaries on urban life in the nation's capital. Included on this DVD is the bonus selection "Is That Jazz," Heron's swinging shout-out to the jazz legends and a rebuke of those who try to limit it. Nobody tells it like it is like Gil Scott-Heron, and nobody ever will. --Eugene Holley Jr.

Gilbert "Gil" Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011)[7] was an American soul and jazz poet,[2][3] musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken-word performer in the 1970s and 1980s. His collaborative efforts with musician Brian Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning social and political issues of the time, delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles by Scott-Heron. His own term for himself was "bluesologist",[8] which he defined as "a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues".[note 1][9]

His music, most notably on the albums Pieces of a Man and Winter in America in the early 1970s, influenced and foreshadowed later African-American music genres such as hip hop and neo soul. Scott-Heron is considered by many to be the first rapper/MC ever. His recording work received much critical acclaim, especially one of his best-known compositions, "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised".[10] AllMusic's John Bush called him "one of the most important progenitors of rap music," stating that "his aggressive, no-nonsense street poetry inspired a legion of intelligent rappers while his engaging songwriting skills placed him square in the R&B charts later in his career."[6]

Scott-Heron remained active until his death, and in 2010 released his first new album in 16 years, entitled I'm New Here. A memoir he had been working on for years up to the time of his death, The Last Holiday, was published posthumously in January 2012.[11][12] Scott-Heron received a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He also is included in the exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture that officially opened on Sept. 24, 2016 on the National Mall, and in an NMAAHC publication, Dream a World Anew.[13]

http://www.gilscottheron.net/

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Michael Lee Aday (born Marvin Lee Aday; September 27, 1947), better known by his stage name Meat Loaf, is an American musician, singer, songwriter, record producer, and actor. He is noted for his powerful, wide-ranging operatic voice and theatrical live shows.

His Bat Out of Hell trilogy of albums (consisting of Bat Out of Hell, Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell, and Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose) has sold more than 50 million copies worldwide.[1] Almost 40 years after its release, Bat Out of Hell still sells an estimated 200,000 copies annually and stayed on the charts for over nine years, making it one of the best selling albums in history.[2][3]

After the commercial success of Bat Out of Hell and Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell and earning a Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for the song "I'd Do Anything for Love", Meat Loaf experienced some initial difficulty establishing a steady career within the United States. However, he has retained iconic status and popularity in Europe, especially the United Kingdom, where he received the 1994 Brit Award for best-selling album and single, appeared in the 1997 film Spice World, and ranks 23rd for the number of weeks spent on the UK charts as of 2006. He ranked 96th on VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock".[2]

He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, with worldwide sales of more than 80 million records.[4] He has also appeared in over 50 movies and television shows,[5] sometimes as himself or as characters resembling his stage persona. His most notable roles include Eddie in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Robert "Bob" Paulson in Fight Club (1999), and "The Lizard" in The 51st State (2002). He has also appeared as a guest actor in television shows such as Monk, Glee, South Park, House, and Tales from the Crypt.

http://meatloaf.net/

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Michael Lee Aday (born Marvin Lee Aday; September 27, 1947), better known by his stage name Meat Loaf, is an American musician, singer, songwriter, record producer, and actor. He is noted for his powerful, wide-ranging operatic voice and theatrical live shows.

His Bat Out of Hell trilogy of albums (consisting of Bat Out of Hell, Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell, and Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose) has sold more than 50 million copies worldwide.[1] Almost 40 years after its release, Bat Out of Hell still sells an estimated 200,000 copies annually and stayed on the charts for over nine years, making it one of the best selling albums in history.[2][3]

After the commercial success of Bat Out of Hell and Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell and earning a Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for the song "I'd Do Anything for Love", Meat Loaf experienced some initial difficulty establishing a steady career within the United States. However, he has retained iconic status and popularity in Europe, especially the United Kingdom, where he received the 1994 Brit Award for best-selling album and single, appeared in the 1997 film Spice World, and ranks 23rd for the number of weeks spent on the UK charts as of 2006. He ranked 96th on VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock".[2]

He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, with worldwide sales of more than 80 million records.[4] He has also appeared in over 50 movies and television shows,[5] sometimes as himself or as characters resembling his stage persona. His most notable roles include Eddie in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Robert "Bob" Paulson in Fight Club (1999), and "The Lizard" in The 51st State (2002). He has also appeared as a guest actor in television shows such as Monk, Glee, South Park, House, and Tales from the Crypt.

http://meatloaf.net/

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Crazy Horse is an American rock band best known for their association with Neil Young. Beginning in 1969 and continuing to the present day, they have been co-credited on a number of Young's albums, with 11 studio albums and numerous live albums being billed as by Neil Young and Crazy Horse. They have also released six studio albums of their own, issued between 1971 and 2009.

Billy Talbot (bass) and Ralph Molina (drums) have been the only consistent members of the band. On four of Crazy Horse's studio albums, Talbot and Molina serve as the rhythm section to an entirely different group of musicians. Save for three notable interregnums (most recently in 2018), Frank "Poncho" Sampedro (rhythm guitar) has regularly performed with the group since 1975.

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Dido Florian Cloud de Bounevialle O'Malley Armstrong,[4] known as Dido (/ˈdaɪdoʊ/, born 25 December 1971), is an English singer and songwriter. Dido attained international success with her debut album No Angel (1999). It sold over 21 million copies worldwide,[5] and won several awards, including the MTV Europe Music Award for Best New Act, two NRJ Awards for Best New Act and Best Album, and two Brit Awards for Best British Female and Best Album. Her next album, Life for Rent (2003), continued her success with the hit singles "White Flag" and "Life for Rent". In 2004 Dido performed with other British and Irish artists in the third incarnation of the song "Do They Know It's Christmas?".

Dido's first two albums are among the best-selling albums in UK Chart history, and both are in the top 10 best-selling albums of the 2000s in the UK.[6] Her third studio album, Safe Trip Home (2008), received critical acclaim but failed to duplicate the commercial success of her previous efforts.[7] She was nominated for an Academy Award for the song "If I Rise".[8] Dido was ranked No. 98 on the Billboard chart of the top Billboard 200 artists of the 2000s (2000–2009) based on the success of her albums in the first decade of the 21st century.[9] Dido made a comeback in 2013, releasing her fourth studio album Girl Who Got Away, which reached the Top 5 in the United Kingdom.

Dido was born at St Mary Abbots hospital in Kensington, London, on Christmas Day 1971.[10] On her birth certificate, her name was registered as Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong.[11][12] Because she was born on Christmas Day, she also celebrates an "official birthday" on 25 June, following the example of Paddington Bear.[13][14] Her mother, Clare (née Collins), is a poet of French ancestry,[12][15] and her father, William O'Malley Armstrong (1938-2006), was an Irish publisher and former managing director of Sidgwick & Jackson.[16][17] Her elder brother, Rowland Constantine O'Malley Armstrong,[18] is better known as record producer Rollo, part of the British electronica trio Faithless. Despite their birth names, the pair were known from childhood by the names Dido and Rollo[12] and Dido considers this as her real name, and not simply a stage name or nickname.[4][14][19] As a child, she had to deal with her birth name's ambiguous and unusual nature, which led to her being bullied[4] and even to her pretending to have an ordinary name.[12] As she explains:

To be called one thing and christened another is actually very confusing and annoying. It's one of the most irritating things that my parents did to me. ... Florian is a German man's name. That's just mean. To give your child a whole lot of odd names. They were all so embarrassing. ... I thought it was cruel to call me Dido and then expect me to just deal with it.
— Dido, Interview published in The Observer in 2001[12]

The name "Dido" derives from the mythical Queen of Carthage.

Dido was educated at Thornhill Primary School in Islington, Dallington School, City of London Girls' and Westminster School where she was taught by the contemporary musician and Head of Academic Music, Sinan Savaskan. After she stole a recorder from school at the age of five,[20] her parents enrolled her at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. By the time she reached her teens she had learned to play the piano, recorder and the violin. She later studied law at Birkbeck, University of London, while working as a literary agent. She never completed the degree, deciding instead to take up music full-time. After learning the guitar, she showcased her skills to audiences during her 2004 Life for Rent tour.

http://didomusic.com/

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Malcolm John Rebennack (born November 21, 1940), better known by his stage name Dr. John, is an American singer and songwriter. His music combines blues, pop, jazz, boogie woogie and rock and roll.[1]

Active as a session musician since the late 1950s, he gained a cult following in the late 1960s following the release of his album Gris-Gris and his appearance at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music. He performed a wildly theatrical stage show inspired by medicine shows, Mardi Gras costumes and voodoo ceremonies. Rebennack has recorded more than 20 albums and in 1973 scored a top-10 hit with "Right Place, Wrong Time".

The winner of six Grammy Awards, Rebennack was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by singer John Legend on March 14, 2011.[2] In May 2013, Rebennack was the recipient of an honorary doctorate of fine arts from Tulane University.[3]

Rebennack was always fascinated with New Orleans voodoo, and in Los Angeles he developed the idea of the Dr. John persona for his old friend Ronnie Barron. He recalls reading about the original Doctor John in his youth, a purported Senegalese prince who came to New Orleans from Haiti, a medicinal and spiritual healer. The Doctor was a free man of color who lived on Bayou Road and claimed to have 15 wives and over 50 children. He maintained a fascination with reptiles and kept an assortment of snakes and lizards, along with embalmed scorpions and animal and human skulls. His specialization was healing, and as such, in selling gris-gris, voodoo amulets that protected the wearer from harm.

"Well, there was a guy the name of Dr. John, a hoodoo guy in New Orleans. He was competition to Marie Laveau. He was like her opposite. I actually got a clipping ... about how my great-great-great-grandpa Wayne was busted with this guy for runnin' a voodoo operation in a whorehouse in 1860. I decided I would produce the record with this as a concept."

Rebennack imagined that this character could front an interesting stage show, while serving as an emblem of New Orleans heritage. Although initially the plan was for Barron to front the act assuming the identity of "Dr. John", while Rebbenack worked behind the scenes as Dr. John's writer/musician/arranger/producer, this didn't come to pass. Barron dropped out of the project, and Rebennack somewhat apprehensively took over the role (and identity) of Dr. John.[7] Gris-Gris became the name of Dr. John's debut album, representing his own form of "voodoo medicine".[8]

http://nitetripper.com/

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Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock; November 26, 1939) is an American-born Swiss singer-songwriter, dancer, actress, and author. Turner rose to international prominence as a featured singer with Ike Turner's Kings of Rhythm before recording hit singles both with Ike and as a solo performer. One of the world's best-selling artists of all time, she has been referred to as The Queen of Rock 'n' Roll[3][4][5] and has sold more than 200 million albums and singles worldwide to date.[6] She is noted for her energetic stage presence, powerful vocals, and career longevity.[4][7] According to Guinness World Records, Turner has sold more concert tickets than any other solo performer in history.[8]

Turner was born to a small family in Nutbush, Tennessee. Growing up throughout the Southeastern United States, she began singing in local church choirs. She began her career in 1958 as a featured singer with Ike Turner's Kings of Rhythm, first recording under the name "Little Ann".[9] Her introduction to the public as Tina Turner began in 1960 as a member of the Ike & Tina Turner Revue.[10] Success followed with a string of notable hits credited to the duo, including "A Fool in Love",[11] "River Deep – Mountain High" (1966), "Proud Mary" (1971), and "Nutbush City Limits" (1973), a song that she wrote. In her autobiography, I, Tina (1986), she revealed several instances of severe domestic abuse against her by Ike Turner prior to their 1976 split and subsequent 1978 divorce. Raised a Baptist, she became an adherent of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism in 1971, crediting the spiritual chant of Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, which Turner says helped her to endure during difficult times.[12][13]

After her divorce from Ike, she rebuilt her career through live performances. In the 1980s, Turner launched a major comeback with another string of hits, starting in late 1983 with the single "Let's Stay Together" followed by the 1984 release of her fifth solo album Private Dancer which became a worldwide success. The album contained the song "What's Love Got to Do with It", which became Turner's biggest hit and won four Grammy Awards including Record of the Year. Her solo success continued throughout the 1980s and 90s with multi-platinum albums including Break Every Rule and Foreign Affair, and with singles such as "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)", "Typical Male", "The Best", "I Don't Wanna Fight", and "GoldenEye", for the 1995 James Bond film of the same name.

In 1993, What's Love Got to Do with It, a biographical film adapted from her autobiography, was released along with an accompanying soundtrack album. In addition to her musical career, Turner has also garnered success acting in films, including the role of the Acid Queen in the 1975 rock musical Tommy, a starring role alongside Mel Gibson in the 1985 action film Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, and a cameo role in the 1993 film Last Action Hero. In 2008, Turner returned from semi-retirement to embark on her Tina!: 50th Anniversary Tour.[14] Turner's tour became one of the highest selling ticketed shows of 2008–09.[15] Although an American citizen by birth, Turner gave up her American citizenship in 2013 after becoming a citizen of Switzerland.[16]

Throughout her career, Turner has won 12 Grammy Awards, comprising eight competitive awards, three Grammy Hall of Fame awards, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. She is the only female artist to garner concurrent Grammy nominations for pop, rock, and R&B.[17][18] In 1993, the World Music Awards recognized her years in the music business by awarding her the Legend Award. In 2000, Turner was the female artist with the most shows with 25 at Wembley Arena and with 5 at Wembley Stadium (three in 1996 and two in 2000) by Wembley Arena Record.[19] In the UK, she is the first female artist to have a top 40 hit in six consecutive decades. She has had a total of 34 top 40 hits.[20] Rolling Stone ranked Turner 63rd on their list of the 100 greatest artists of all time[21] and 17th on their list of the 100 greatest singers of all time. In 1991, Turner was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[22] Turner has her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and the St. Louis Walk of Fame.[23]In 2014, She was inducted into the SoulMusic Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award.[24]

http://tinaturnerofficial.com/

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Alice Cooper (born Vincent Damon Furnier; February 4, 1948)[1] is an American singer, songwriter, and actor whose career spans over fifty years. With his distinctive raspy voice and a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood, deadly snakes, baby dolls, and dueling swords, Cooper is considered by music journalists and peers alike to be "The Godfather of Shock Rock". He has drawn equally from horror films, vaudeville, and garage rock to pioneer a macabre and theatrical brand of rock designed to shock people.[2]

Originating in Phoenix, Arizona, in the late 1960s after he moved from Detroit, Michigan, "Alice Cooper" was originally a band consisting of Furnier on vocals and harmonica, Glen Buxton on lead guitar, Michael Bruce on rhythm guitar, Dennis Dunaway on bass guitar, and Neal Smith on drums. The original Alice Cooper band released its first album in 1969. They broke into the international music mainstream with the 1971 hit song "I'm Eighteen" from their third studio album Love It to Death. The band reached their commercial peak in 1973 with their sixth studio album Billion Dollar Babies.[3] In 2011, the original Alice Cooper band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[4]

Furnier adopted the band's name as his own name in the 1970s and began a solo career with the 1975 concept album Welcome to My Nightmare. Expanding from his Detroit rock roots, Cooper has experimented with a number of musical styles, including art rock, hard rock, heavy metal, new wave,[5] glam metal,[6][7] and industrial rock.

Cooper is known for his sociable and witty personality offstage, with The Rolling Stone Album Guide calling him the world's most "beloved heavy metal entertainer".[8] He is credited with helping to shape the sound and look of heavy metal, and has been described as the artist who "first introduced horror imagery to rock'n'roll, and whose stagecraft and showmanship have permanently transformed the genre".[9] Away from music, Cooper is a film actor, a golfing celebrity, a restaurateur, and, since 2004, a popular radio DJ with his classic rock show Nights with Alice Cooper.

http://alicecooper.com/

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Setlist:
0:00:00 - Sweet Jane
0:04:05 - I'm Waiting For My Man
0:08:15 - Martial Law
0:12:57 - Down At The Arcade
0:17:22 - Legendary Hearts
0:20:48 - There She Goes Again
0:24:48 - Turn Out the Light
0:29:58 - My Red Joystick
0:35:19 - Average Guy
0:38:50 - Street Hassle
0:44:24 - Sally Can't Dance
0:50:10 - Walk On The Wild Side
0:56:09 - Satellite Of Love
1:03:21 - New Sensation
1:11:08 - A Gift
1:14:56 - Doin' The Things That We Want To
1:19:12 - Waves Of Fear
1:22:27 - I Love You Suzanne
1:25:35 - White Light / White Heat
1:29:54 - Turn To Me
1:34:40 - Kill Your Sons
1:40:19 - Coney Island Baby
1:45:46 - Maybe - The Chantels
1:49:35 - He's Gone
1:53:18 - People Who Died - Jim Carroll
1:58:47 - Rock 'N' Roll

Personnel: Lou Reed - Vocals, Guitar Robert Quine - Guitar Fernando Saunders - Bass, Vocals Peter Wood - Keyboards Lenny Ferarri - Drums

Lewis Allan Reed (March 2, 1942 – October 27, 2013) was an American musician, singer, and songwriter. He was the lead guitarist, singer and principal songwriter for the rock band the Velvet Underground and also had a solo career that spanned five decades. The Velvet Underground achieved little commercial success during their existence, but are now regarded as one of the most influential bands in the history of underground and alternative rock music.

After leaving the band in 1970, Reed released twenty solo studio albums. His second solo album, Transformer (1972), produced by David Bowie and arranged by Mick Ronson, brought Reed mainstream recognition. After Transformer, the concept album Berlin reached No. 7 on the UK Albums Chart. Rock n Roll Animal (a live album released in 1974) sold strongly, and Sally Can't Dance (1974) peaked at number 10 on the Billboard 200, but for a period Reed's work did not translate into sales, leading him into drug addiction and alcoholism. Reed made a gradual return to prominence with New Sensations (1984), and his album New York (1989) is recognized as the height of his mid period.

Reed participated in a revival of the Velvet Underground in the 1990s, and made several more albums, including a tribute to his mentor Andy Warhol. He contributed music to two theatrical interpretations of 19th-century writers, one of which he developed into an album. He married his third wife Laurie Anderson in 2008, made an album with Metallica, and died in 2013 of liver disease after a transplant. Reed is a two-time inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a member of The Velvet Underground and posthumously as a solo artist.

Reed's distinctive deadpan voice, poetic lyrics and experimental guitar playing style were trademarks he carried throughout his long career.

http://loureed.com/

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Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 – October 4, 1970), nicknamed The Pearl, was an American rock, soul and blues singer and songwriter, and one of the most successful and widely-known female rock stars of her era.[1][2][3] After releasing three albums, she died of a heroin overdose at the age of 27. A fourth album, Pearl, was released in January 1971, just over three months after her death. It reached number one on the Billboard charts.

In 1967, Joplin rose to fame during an appearance at Monterey Pop Festival, where she was the lead singer of the then little-known San Francisco psychedelic rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company.[4][5][6] After releasing two albums with the band, she left Big Brother to continue as a solo artist with her own backing groups, first the Kozmic Blues Band and then the Full Tilt Boogie Band. She appeared at the Woodstock festival and the Festival Express train tour. Five singles by Joplin went into the Billboard Hot 100, including a cover of the Kris Kristofferson song "Me and Bobby McGee", which reached number 1 in March 1971.[7] Her most popular songs include her cover versions of "Piece of My Heart", "Cry Baby", "Down on Me", "Ball and Chain", and "Summertime"; and her original song "Mercedes Benz", her final recording.[8][9]

Joplin, highly respected for her charismatic performing ability, was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Audiences and critics alike referred to her stage presence as "electric". Rolling Stone ranked Joplin number 46 on its 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time[10] and number 28 on its 2008 list of 100 Greatest Singers of All Time. She remains one of the top-selling musicians in the United States, with Recording Industry Association of America certifications of 15.5 million albums sold.[11]

http://janisjoplin.com/

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John Francis Anthony "Jaco" Pastorius III (/ˈdʒɑːkoʊ pæsˈtɔːriəs/, December 1, 1951 – September 21, 1987) was an American jazz bassist who was a member of Weather Report from 1976 to 1981. He worked with Pat Metheny, Joni Mitchell, and recorded albums as a solo artist and band leader.[1] His bass playing employed funk, lyrical solos, bass chords, and innovative harmonics. He was one of seven bassists to be inducted into the DownBeat Jazz Hall of Fame.

By 1968–1969, at the age of 17, Pastorius had begun to appreciate jazz and had saved enough money to buy an upright bass. Its deep, mellow tone appealed to him, though it strained his finances. He had difficulty maintaining the instrument, which he attributed to the humidity in Florida. When he woke one day to find it had cracked, he traded it for a 1962 Fender Jazz Bass.[3]

In his teens he played bass guitar for Wayne Cochran and the C.C. Riders.[4]
Pastorius playing bass shirtless in his early years
Pastorius on November 27, 1977

In the early 1970s, Pastorius taught bass at the University of Miami, where he befriended jazz guitarist Pat Metheny, who was also on the faculty. With Paul Bley, Pastorius and Metheny recorded an album, later titled Jaco (Improvising Artists, 1974).[5] Pastorius then played on Metheny's debut album, Bright Size Life (ECM, 1976).[6] He recorded his debut solo album, Jaco Pastorius (Epic, 1976) with Michael Brecker, Randy Brecker, Herbie Hancock, Hubert Laws, Pat Metheny, Sam & Dave, David Sanborn, and Wayne Shorter.[7]

http://jacopastorius.com/

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Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. He is among the most influential and acclaimed figures in the history of jazz and 20th century music. Davis adopted a variety of musical directions in his five-decade career which kept him at the forefront of a number of major stylistic developments in jazz.[1]

Born and raised in Illinois, Davis left his studies at The Juilliard School in New York City and made his professional debut as a member of saxophonist Charlie Parker's bebop quintet from 1944 to 1948. Shortly after, he recorded the Birth of the Cool sessions for Capitol Records, which were instrumental to the development of cool jazz. In the early 1950s, Davis recorded some of the earliest hard bop music while on Prestige Records but did so haphazardly due to a heroin addiction. After a widely acclaimed comeback performance at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1955, he signed a long-term contract with Columbia Records and recorded the 1957 album 'Round About Midnight.[2] It was his first work with saxophonist John Coltrane and bassist Paul Chambers, key members of the sextet he led into the early 1960s. During this period, he alternated between orchestral jazz collaborations with arranger Gil Evans, such as the Spanish-influenced Sketches of Spain (1960), and band recordings, such as Milestones (1958) and Kind of Blue (1959).[3] The latter recording remains one of the most popular jazz albums of all time,[4] having sold over four million copies in the U.S.

Davis made several line-up changes while recording Someday My Prince Will Come (1961), his 1961 Blackhawk concerts, and Seven Steps to Heaven (1963), another mainstream success that introduced bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock, and drummer Tony Williams.[3] After adding saxophonist Wayne Shorter to his new quintet in 1964,[3] Davis led them on a series of more abstract recordings often composed by the band members, helping pioneer the post-bop genre with albums such as E.S.P (1965) and Miles Smiles (1967),[5] before transitioning into his electric period. During the 1970s, he experimented with rock, funk, African rhythms, emerging electronic music technology, and an ever-changing line-up of musicians, including keyboardist Joe Zawinul, drummer Al Foster, and guitarist John McLaughlin.[6] This period, beginning with Davis' 1969 studio album In a Silent Way and concluding with the 1975 concert recording Agharta, was the most controversial in his career, alienating and challenging many in jazz.[7] His million-selling 1970 record Bitches Brew helped spark a resurgence in the genre's commercial popularity with jazz fusion as the decade progressed.[8]

After a five-year retirement due to poor health, Davis resumed his career in the 1980s, employing younger musicians and pop sounds on albums such as The Man with the Horn (1981) and Tutu (1986). Critics were generally unreceptive but the decade garnered the trumpeter his highest level of commercial recognition. He performed sold-out concerts worldwide while branching out into visual arts, film, and television work, before his death in 1991 from the combined effects of a stroke, pneumonia and respiratory failure.[9] In 2006, Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[10] which recognized him as "one of the key figures in the history of jazz".[10] Rolling Stone described him as "the most revered jazz trumpeter of all time, not to mention one of the most important musicians of the 20th century,"[9] while Gerald Early called him inarguably one of the most influential and innovative musicians of that period.[11]

http://milesdavis.com/

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In 1975 Ella Fitzgerald and Joe Pass toured with part of the repertoire to be used on the next album. At 57 years of age with impeccable interpretation, breath and rhythm. Ella Fitzgerald sings anything, goes from the cheerful Scat to the Blues.

With the same vitality from the beginning of his career, he plays sublime classics alongside Joe Pass, a combination that could not be better. With a career spanning 59 years and a 13 Grammys winner, Ella Fitzgerald lived up to her nickname First Lady of Song, which she kept until the end of her life.

Ella interprets each singing song intimately, has a unique diction and sense of rhythm, qualities that have made her one of the greatest voices of Jazz, along with Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan. Without a doubt an unforgettable encounter.

Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) was an American jazz singer sometimes referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz, and Lady Ella. She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing, intonation, and a "horn-like" improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

After tumultuous teenage years, Fitzgerald found stability in musical success with the Chick Webb Orchestra, performing across the country but most often associated with the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. Fitzgerald's rendition of the nursery rhyme "A-Tisket, A-Tasket" helped boost both her and Webb to national fame. After taking over the band when Webb died, Fitzgerald left it behind in 1942 to start her solo career.

Her manager was Moe Gale, co-founder of the Savoy[1], until she turned the rest of her career over to Norman Granz, who founded Verve Records to produce new records by Fitzgerald. With Verve she recorded some of her more widely noted works, particularly her interpretations of the Great American Songbook.

While Fitzgerald appeared in movies and as a guest on popular television shows in the second half of the twentieth century, her musical collaborations with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and The Ink Spots were some of her most notable acts outside of her solo career. These partnerships produced some of her best-known songs such as "Dream a Little Dream of Me", "Cheek to Cheek", "Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall", and "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)".

In 1993, she ended her nearly 60-year career with her last public performance. Three years later, she died at the age of 79 after years of declining health. Her accolades included fourteen Grammy Awards, the National Medal of Arts, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

http://ellafitzgerald.com/

Joe Pass (born Joseph Anthony Jacobi Passalaqua; January 13, 1929 – May 23, 1994) was an American jazz guitarist of Sicilian descent. He is considered one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the 20th century.[1][2] He created possibilities for jazz guitar through his style of chord-melody, his knowledge of chord inversions and progressions, and his use of walking basslines and counterpoint during improvisation. Pass worked often with pianist Oscar Peterson and vocalist Ella Fitzgerald.

Born in New Brunswick, New Jersey,[3] Joe Pass was the son of Mariano Passalaqua, a Sicilian-born steel mill worker. He was raised in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. He received his first guitar, a Harmony, on his ninth birthday. His father recognized early that his son had "a little something happening" and pushed him to learn tunes by ear, practice scales, play pieces written for other instruments, and to fill in the space between the notes of the melody.[citation needed]

As early as 14, Pass started getting jobs performing. He played with bands led by Tony Pastor and Charlie Barnet, honing his guitar skills while learning about the music business. He began traveling with small jazz groups and moved from Pennsylvania to New York City. In a few years, he developed a heroin addiction and spent much of the 1950s in prison. He emerged from addiction through a two-and-a-half-year stay in the Synanon rehabilitation program. During that time he "didn't do a lot of playing".[4] In 1962 he recorded Sounds of Synanon. Around this time he received his trademark Gibson ES-175 guitar as a gift, which he used on tours and records for many years.

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Live in California 74 is a live DVD of the first California Jam concert performance from Deep Purple released in 2005. It was recorded and aired live by ABC-TV on 6 April 1974 at the Ontario Speedway near Los Angeles, California. This concert was one of the first ever music concerts issued on videotape and laser disc in 1981 under the title California Jam in Japan and the UK.

This is the first official release on DVD of the complete concert. "Lay Down, Stay Down" was not included on the original video release. The camera angles are also different from the original 1981 release, from which two songs are provided as bonus items.

The first four songs are from the newly released album Burn. Other songs are from the Made in Japan setlist. "Smoke on the Water", "Space Truckin'" and also "Lazy" and "The Mule", which are played as intro and outro during "You Fool No One".

Deep Purple continued to perform concerts worldwide, including an appearance at the 1974 'California Jam', a televised concert festival that also included many other prominent bands. At the moment Deep Purple were due to appear, Ritchie Blackmore locked himself in his dressing room and refused to go onstage. Previous performers had finished early, and it was still not sunset, the time at which the band had originally been scheduled to start. Blackmore felt this would dull the effect of the band's light show. After ABC brought in a sheriff to arrest him, Blackmore agreed to perform. At the culmination of the performance, he destroyed several of his guitars and threw one of his amplifier stacks off the edge of the stage. He also struck one of the ABC cameras five times with a guitar and, in recorded footage, can be seen arranging for his road crew to set off a pyrotechnic device in one of his amplifiers, creating a large fireball that was quickly extinguished. The band quickly exited the venue by helicopter, avoiding fire marshals, police officers and ABC executives.

http://deep-purple.com/

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'Til Tuesday (often written as ’til tuesday) was an American new wave and alternative rock band formed in Boston, Massachusetts. The band, consisting of Aimee Mann (lead vocals, bass), Robert Holmes (guitar), Joey Pesce (keyboards), and Michael Hausman (drums), was active from 1982 to 1989. They are best known for their 1985 hit single "Voices Carry".

'Til Tuesday first gained fame six months after its formation when it won Boston's WBCN Rock & Roll Rumble in 1983. Their original composition "Love in a Vacuum" (credited to all members of the group) received a fair amount of airplay on the station, and the group was eventually signed to Epic Records.[1]

"Love in a Vacuum" was re-recorded for the Epic debut album, 1985's Voices Carry; however, the breakthrough song turned out to be the title track. The "Voices Carry" single peaked at number eight on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100,[2] and is said to have been inspired by an argument between Mann and Hausman, who had broken off a relationship before the album's release.[citation needed] According to producer Mike Thorne on his Stereo Society web site, "The title track was originally written and sung by Aimee as if to a woman.... The record company was predictably unhappy with such lyrics."[3] Rolling Stone magazine would later report that Epic Records labelmate Cyndi Lauper was interested in recording "Voices Carry" with the original lyric, but only if the band didn't put it on their own release.[citation needed] The band declined.[citation needed]

The band became an early MTV staple with the "Voices Carry" video, which depicts an oppressive boyfriend trying to convert Mann to his upper-class lifestyle; she finally lashes out at him during a concert at Carnegie Hall, though filmed at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Massachusetts, standing up from her seat in the audience and belting the lyrics, "He said, shut up! He said, shut up! Oh God, can't you keep it down...?" as she removes her cap to reveal her signature spiky, rat-tailed hair. As a result, the group won that year's MTV Video Music Award for Best New Artist.[citation needed]

By the 1986 follow-up Welcome Home, Mann was beginning to write more of the songs herself and the band was moving away from the slick new wave sound of their debut. But while critical reaction was generally strong, the #26 placing for the lead single, "What About Love", was a commercial disappointment, especially after the top-ten success of "Voices Carry". Even more problematic, the album just barely sneaked into the U.S. top 50,[4] also a letdown after the #19 placing for their debut.[5]

After the album's release Pesce left the band and was replaced by Michael Montes. Guitarists Jon Brion and Clayton Scoble also joined the group, although not as permanent members.[citation needed]

At about the same time, Mann's two-year relationship with singer-songwriter Jules Shear, who she had been dating since the release of the Voices Carry album, came to an end.[6] This breakup somewhat informed the band's final album, 1988's Everything's Different Now, particularly in the song "J for Jules", though Mann insisted that not every song on the LP was about the relationship. Shear collaborated with Matthew Sweet on the album's title track; it also featured "The Other End (of the Telescope)", a collaboration between Mann and Elvis Costello on which Costello provides a guest vocal.[citation needed]

While critical praise continued to flow, Everything's Different Now was not a commercial success. The album peaked at No. 124, while the lead single "(Believed You Were) Lucky" (co-written with Shear) reached number 95.[citation needed]

'Til Tuesday essentially broke up after the release of Everything's Different Now. However, Mann toured under the 'Til Tuesday name with various session players, while legal problems with the band's label Epic prevented her from beginning work on a solo record for several years. (Mann's solo career officially began in 1992.[citation needed]) Hausman, meanwhile, became Mann's manager, a position he holds to this day.

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Sheena Shirley Easton (née Orr; born 27 April 1959) is a Scottish singer, songwriter and actress with dual British-American nationality. Easton first came into the public eye as the focus of an episode in the first British musical reality television programme The Big Time: Pop Singer, which recorded her attempts to gain a record contract and her eventual signing with EMI Records.

Easton's first two singles, "Modern Girl" and "Morning Train (Nine to Five)", both entered the UK Top Ten, and she was the first UK female artist to appear twice in the same Top Ten since Ruby Murray. In 1981, "Morning Train (Nine to Five)" topped the US Hot 100, making her the third UK female solo artist to achieve this, following Petula Clark and Lulu, and she became one of the most successful British female performers of the 1980s.

A six-time Grammy nominee in the U.S., Easton is a two-time Grammy Award winner, winning Best New Artist in 1981[1] and Best Mexican-American Performance in 1985,[2] for her duet with Luis Miguel on the song "Me Gustas Tal Como Eres". She has received five U.S. Gold albums and one U.S. Platinum album. She has recorded 16 studio albums, released 45 singles total worldwide, and had 20 consecutive US singles, including 15 U.S. Top 40 singles, seven U.S. top tens and one U.S. No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1981 and 1991. She also had 25 top 40 hits in international territories around the world. In Canada, Easton scored three gold and two platinum albums. She has sold over 20 million albums and singles worldwide.

Easton became the first and only artist in history to have a Top 5 hit on five different Billboard charts consecutively, with "Morning Train (Nine to Five)" (Pop), "We've Got Tonight" with Kenny Rogers (country) and "Sugar Walls" (both R&B and dance).

Easton's other hits include the James Bond theme "For Your Eyes Only", "Strut", "U Got the Look" and "The Arms of Orion" with Prince, "The Lover in Me" and "What Comes Naturally". She has worked with prominent vocalists and producers, such as Prince, Christopher Neil, Kenny Rogers, David Foster, Luis Miguel, L.A. Reid & Babyface, Patrice Rushen and Nile Rodgers.

http://www.sheenaeaston.com/

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Starless by King Crimson. Another taster from the new King Crimson album - "Radical Action to Unseat the Hold of Monkey Mind". As those lucky enough to have seen it live will know, the opening chord of this song are often accompanied by an intake of breath. Like an incoming tide of realisation, all the variations on "I never thought I’d hear this live", or "crikey, this is my favourite", "OMG I’ve died and gone to heaven" and a few more sentiments besides. The complexities behind capturing the seven-headed Crimson on video are described in David Singleton's liner notes : "It is something of a truism in the history of Crimson that any show that is filmed will not be one when heaven meets earth and the angels descend. The presence of cameras and cameramen iintroduces an intrusive element into the relationship between the artist, the music and the audience. Our solution was to return to the concept of "BootlegTV" and prioritise the music and the performance rather than the pictures. We embedded a single cameraman (the long-suffering Trevor Wilkins) on this tour, and he filmed every night with a a series of cameras hidden discreetly on the stage where they would intrude on neither artist nor audience. The compromise is thus in the visuals and not in the music." The set was recently described by John Kelman in "All about jazz" as "the definitive live Crimson release from the definitive live Crimson lineup; a landmark recording from a group whose discography is filled with them."

http://dgmlive.com/

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The Song is Titled "Dickey Betts" This Composition is a Tribute to the Allman Brothers Guitarist.

Michael Melchiondo, Jr. (born September 25, 1970), better known by his stage name Dean Ween, is an American guitarist, and is one half of the alternative rock group Ween. Melchiondo is currently active in the groups Moistboyz, The Dean Ween Group and Ween.

Melchiondo met Aaron Freeman in a junior high school typing class in their hometown of New Hope, Pennsylvania. The two adopted the fictitious surname, Ween, with Melchiondo taking up the name Dean Ween and Freeman the name Gene Ween.

Melchiondo started up another band called the Moistboyz.

After having recorded 12 Golden Country Greats, an album of ten country tunes Ween had written over the years with the help of Charlie McCoy, Buddy Harman, and Bobby Ogdin, in Nashville was released in 1996.

Melchiondo made contributions to two projects by his friend Josh Homme: The Desert Sessions and Queens of the Stone Age. On the 2002 Queens of the Stone Age album Songs for the Deaf, Melchiondo played guitar on "Mosquito Song", "Gonna Leave You", and "Six Shooter".

In 2009 Melchiondo received his captain's license and regularly leads fishing trips off the Jersey shore as Mickey's Guide Service.[1][2][3]

In 2013, Melchiondo released the fifth Moistboyz album, "Moistboyz V". In August 2016 the Dean Ween Group's debut album, The Deaner Album, was announced. It was subsequently released on October 21 through ATO Records.[4]

http://www.thedeanweengroup.com/

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Created 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

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CategoryMusic

This channel isn't a monetary one.

It's just a channel for Exposing Bands, Musicians, sharing their good music that Inspired me, moved me, For Our Generation & especially For the Younger Generation who may or may NOT have had the chance to HEAR or SEE Some Really Great Bands & Great Music.

I'm a Professional in the Music Industry, both as a Musician & Offstage, Sound~Studio.

Here you will find mostly High Quality Audio & Video Music that Influenced me or made me go hmmm, some of my Original Music, a bit of comedy and a few Animals Videos too.... I Loves All Animals,

Please Subscribe ~ Enjoy the Music & Say Hi !

Tommy Gallagher is not your run of the mill "Dude with a guitar." Left & Right of center, sarcastic, and a bit pissed off, Gallagher breaks the mold of the stereotypical singer/songwriter and instead revels in pushing the envelope by blending the rawness of a Blues Rocker and the softness of a balladeer with the edginess of rock and roll.

Tommy was an original member of Second Generation from 1987 till the bands Last Show in December of '95 & Tribute music night to Jerry Garcia.

Tommy Gallagher's Incredible Friends or TGIF 2008 -2010 Included all the Personnel listed below.

"A New Brain For Arnie" is 100% Improv

5 X Grammy Nominee & Former Bassist for, Spyro Gyra, The Rippingtons, Firefall ~ Kim Stones Project,
{ A New Brain For Arnie }

Member from 2009 til Tommy left August 2011 Completely improvised Freeform start to finish.
A Wonderful Band that could take you all over the Universe.

"Nobody Ever Wins The Giant Panda" ~ A New Brain For Arnie ~ CD if you can find it.
Produced & Mixed By Tommy Gallagher, Kim Stone & Michael Reese.

Band Personnel:

Kim Stone Bass -> See above
Michael Reese Guitar -> L.A.Music Award Winner
Wayne Hammerstadt -> Guitar Virtuoso Classical & Electric
Bryant Jones Keyboards -> Shakedown Street
Dewey Steele Drums -> Capital Records Sessions
Jimmy Lange B3 -> Wendy Woo BlueRiddum Band
Lenny Campanaro Drums -> Iron Butterfly, BadFinger
Tommy Gallagher -> SingerSongWriter Guitar

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