Neu75

Neu75

Neu75

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Rather like those Quality Street tins with the Victoriana artwork, the 1980s had something for everyone in the annual race for the prestigious Christmas number 1. Charity singles, novelty singles, covers and flavours of the month. Singles for grannies and the kiddies, with only the occasional actual decent song or two actually reaching the summit by Xmas Day.

Featuring performances from Jona Lewie, The Snowmen, David Essex, The Pretenders, Band Aid, Aled Jones, The Housemartins, Alison Moyet & Cliff Richard. Merry Christmas...

Rest In Peace Eddie Large, Frank Bough and Sean Connery

Entirely in keeping with the bombastic spirit of the age were the arena (or stadium) rock acts, almost custom built for reach the back of the audience. Many of the acts featured had been around a while but found their calling among the masses that attended and bought the t-shirt. Such was the impact, when the subject of the starving millions reached the public consciousness in the mid-80s, it made sense to raise awareness in this manner. Live Aid was the peak for the anthemic rockers and sparked further marathons of entertainment for worthy causes. Please give generously...

Featuring big performances from REO Speedwagon, Journey, Survivor, Pat Benatar, ZZ Top, Queen, Foreigner, Aerosmith and Dire Straits.

Well I marked Bryan Ferry's 75th, now it's Neil's turn, albeit somewhat shorter.
Consider this an outtake from a forthcoming show looking at the pop scene of 1971...

This edition looks at the development of what was to be termed (and indeed marketed as) Alternative music (or in the UK as "indie") from its roots in the punk/post-punk era of the early 80s through the decade of decadence and glitz which the indie scene thumbed their noses at, although a few of the acts would have liked at least a bit of the pop scene's stardust to blow their way, now and again. By the decades close, the ground was being set for the mainstream to embrace the alternative...

Featuring performances from Public Image Limited, The Pop Group, The Psychedelic Furs, The Smiths, The Fall, Hüsker Dü, The Replacements, Pixies and Sonic Youth.

Technology moved in leaps and bounds in the 1980s and music was at the forefront. Multi-track recording, MIDI systems, samplers and of course cheaper and more powerful synthesizers and drum machines shaped the sounds. This edition takes a broader look at the impact of electronic music: from the synthpop bands in Britain, through the Chicago and Detroit scenes and via the Balearics back to the UK again with the rise of Acid House.

Featuring performances from The Human League, Yellow Magic Orchestra, Depeche Mode, New Order, Afrika Bambaataa, Herbie Hancock, Farley "Jackmaster" Funk, S-Express and Inner City.

Today is Bryan Ferry's 75th birthday, so mark this occasion, we going to have a look at his fabulous creation Roxy Music. Bursting into the denim-clad rock scene of 1972, their inspired amateurism and daring use of artifice within the pop medium presaged punk and post-punk, while the sartorial elegance of singer Ferry nodded towards the New Romantics in the 1980s. Even though they are somewhat thin on the ground these days, any "art rock" band who try to establish a certain aesthetic, in music, packaging and look, have the Roxy DNA in them somewhere down the line. Even the likes of disco legends Chic were influenced by them. So sit back and enjoy the Thrill of it All!

"Sophisti-pop" is a retrospective term, much like the US's "Yacht Rock" and like it's cross-Atlantic counterpart, there was a definite aspirational tinge to the music during the most aspirational decade of the lot. It was stylish and smooth, arty but not too arty. There was a political dimension too, with some of the acts firmly leaning to the left despite the target audience being arguably not of the proletarian kind. The thing that one remembers from this movement, such as it was that there was a lot of industry hype surrounding many of the acts featured. It was fashionable but as ever thus, the wind changed and by the 90s, sophisti-pop faded away...

Featuring performances from ABC, Blue Rondo A La Turk, The Style Council, Matt Bianco, Sade, Scritti Politti, Simply Red, Swing Out Sister and Curiosity Killed the Cat.

Heavy Metal was born in the 70s but grew up in the 80s, fostering a legion of sub-genres: Glam metal, Hair metal, Speed metal, Thrash metal etc etc. But when most people (apart from headbangers) think of "eighties" music, Metal isn't the music form that leaps to mind. Yet it dominated the decade. Perhaps because metal bands relied more on word-of-mouth and building a loyal following rather than rushing to fill TV spots, not that metal bands were immune to a bit of the decade's video promo inspired stardust...

Featuring performances from Judas Priest, Motorhead, Iron Maiden, Def Leppard, Twisted Sister, Van Halen, Bon Jovi, Guns n' Roses and Metallica.

There was a time when Britain's relationship with Europe wasn't so brittle. Certainly the general public had no issue in propelling European pop acts to the top of the charts, as this programme amply demonstrates. Sweden, Greece, Germany, Netherlands, Austria, Norway and Italy are all represented. Curiously though not France even though the complimentary imagery has a notable Gallic influence. C'est La Vie...

Featuring performances from ABBA, Jon & Vangelis, Trio, Alphaville, Mai Tai, Opus, Falco, A-Ha and Spagna.

The city of Liverpool in the 1980s was in turmoil: Rising unemployment, riots and far left political chicanery dominated the headlines. But in music, television and football, there was a renaissance - with a wave of bands inspired by punk rock frequently entering the charts, recalling the beat boom of the 1960s, TV hits centred around the city, such as Boys From the Blackstuff and Brookside, which did not gloss over the problems on Merseyside. But it was football that the biggest success of all, with Liverpool and Everton dominating the English game which had major problems of its own at that time...

Featuring performances from The Teardrop Explodes, Echo & the Bunnymen, A Flock of Seagulls, China Crisis, Wah!, Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Dead or Alive, The Christians and Black.

Another edition of the Goal of the Season music montage...

Essentially the choice of goals was the "86" part of season 1985/86 as a TV blackout of domestic football coverage took the game off the box. It was business as usual for Liverpool, as they secured their first League and FA Cup double at the expense of their Merseyside rivals Everton. The winning goal was Bryan Robson's precise volley for England against Israel in the lead up to that year's World Cup in Mexico...

Music by Public Image Limited.

Fourth in the series of Match of the Day Goal of Season contenders with added music of the period.

1983/84 saw Liverpool win a third consecutive league title, along with the European Cup and League Cup. For the third season in a row, the Reds beat the eventual FA Cup winners. In this case, their Merseyside rivals Everton, who were starting a little bit of trophy gathering for themselves...

Runners-up were Southampton, managed by Lawrie McMenemy and it was their young winger Danny Wallace who snatched the Goal of the Season prize for his spectacular overhead kick goal against the champions at The Dell.

Music by Echo & the Bunnymen

Here's the third in the series of reimagined MOTD GOTS contenders...

Liverpool retained the Division One title and the League Cup against FA Cup winners Manchester United. "King Kenny" Dalglish enjoyed a later-career renaissance in partnership with Ian Rush, but it was his superb goal for Scotland against Belgium which won the Goal of the Season award.

Music by New Order.

Another edition of the alternative BBC Goal of the Season rundown...

1981/82 saw Liverpool regain the Division One title and Tottenham Hotspur retain the FA Cup, with the two clubs fighting out for the League Cup as well.
The late, great Cyrille Regis won the award for his thunderbolt for West Brom against Norwich City.

Music by Pigbag.

As we wait patiently for the return of the Premier League from the Coronavirus hiatus, here's a little bit of "What if?" whimsy...

Since the 90s, Match of the Day's Goal of the Month/Goal of the Season compilations would feature contemporary music in the background, but what if the BBC started this trend earlier?

Here is season 1980/81 best goals - the winner at the time was Tony Morley's cracker for champions Aston Villa against Everton, but of course that was announced before Ricky Villa stepped onto the Wembley turf...

Music by Talking Heads

Florian ist tot. †

Were the 1980s the Golden Age of Scottish Pop?
It certainly was an eclectic scene with a mixture of New Wave, Celtic rock, Blue-eyed soul, Stadium fillers, noisy indie and Dream pop among other sounds. Scotland had a rough time of in terms of the economy but in comedy, music and the arts, it was not lacking in creativity or popularity...

This special presentation features performances from Simple Minds, Altered Images, Associates, Orange Juice, Big Country, Cocteau Twins, Lloyd Cole & the Commotions, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Waterboys, Wet Wet Wet, Deacon Blue and Texas.

As the Land of Oz moved towards the bicentenary of it's discovery, the nation's culture profile was raised considerably. With the likes of Mel Gibson and Paul Hogan making it big in Hollywood and Australian dramas dominating British TV schedules, the Eighties was a fine time to be an Aussie. They even won the America's Cup! Australia did pretty well in the pop world too as you'll see...

Featuring performances from Olivia Newton-John, Joe Dolce Music Theatre, Icehouse, Men At Work, AC/DC, INXS, The Go-Betweens, Mental As Anything and Kylie Minogue.

Note: This replaces the planned edition which has had to be delayed because of you know what...

The island of Ireland had a rollercoaster ride in the Eighties: In the south, there was a struggling economy. The north took much of the headlines with "the Troubles" reaching its peak: bombings, hunger-strikes and a continual army presence on the streets. However, through music, sport and culture there were signs of the renaissance to come in the 1990s. Here is a look on the Irish influence on British pop in the 1980s...

Featuring performances from Thin Lizzy, The Undertones, Foster and Allen, Clannad, U2, Microdisney, The Pogues, Sinead O'Connor and The Hothouse Flowers in this St Patrick's Day special.

On this "leap" day, may I allow myself a little indulgence and present my favourite albums of the previous decade. Note that none were actually released in the 2010s! This is a list of the mostly vinyl albums that I have listened to in the previous ten years. Remember folks this is my own opinion so don't be nonplussed that such and such is above your favourite album ever...

The second wave of the Cold War caused much anxiety, with President Reagan ramping up the rhetoric and the Soviet regime, led by a succession of ageing leaders showing little signs of compromise. This unease was reflected in eighties pop culture, with many music artists, TV programmes and films often openly suggesting the possibility of nuclear apocalypse. What we weren't to know at the time until the dying embers of the decade that it wasn't "The End" that the West and the East were expecting...

Featuring Kate Bush, The Specials, Klaus Nomi, R.E.M., Nena, Tears for Fears, Sly Fox, Timbuk 3 and Morrissey.

Every year, the BBC round up a list of music press and trend watchers to predict the coming pop stars of the year. These days some of the names that crop up sound like they were made up on the spot and randomly picked out of a hat. But how perspicacious would Auntie Beeb and co have been in an earlier age when pop was a more robust state?
Not surprisingly when making this list there was plenty to choose, with the acts then as now having differing fortunes...

Yes it really is 40 years since the 80s began and to celebrate, here is a collection of hits from that year, a great one for pop culture if not the best.
But they're not from the usual suspects such as Blondie or Madness etc but a collection which demonstrates that pop as it entered the Me decade (or was that the 70s?) was in fine fettle as a well as a dip into some of the events and pop culture of that year, from Tiswas to Who Shot J.R.?

Featuring performances from Joe Jackson, The Buggles, Martha and the Muffins, Peter Gabriel, Jona Lewie, Nick Straker Band, Split Enz, Robert Palmer and The Stray Cats. Now where's that Rubik's Cube...

If you thought we live in politicized times today, that was nothing compared to the 80s!
The Thatcher revolution had its fair share of critics in the pop world, some from surprising places as you'll see. When the Iron Lady increased her grip in the aftermath of the Falklands War, attention shifted to other causes such as Apartheid in South Africa. I post this as the left in the UK find themselves pondering another decade in the wilderness.
Will there be a similar musical response in the 20s?

Featuring performances from The Jam, The Gang of Four, Bucks Fizz, The Beat, Robert Wyatt, The Special AKA, The Redskins, Billy Bragg, Steven Van Zandt and The The.

Release the Bats AKA the Halloween Goth Rock Special!

Goth was one of the more unique subcultures in 1980s pop. Evolving from Post-punk, Gothic rock took inspiration from the darker end of 1960s rock (The Doors, The Velvet Underground) as well as the more arty, theatrical side of Glam. It's aesthetics from fashion to club culture still resonates to this day. Everyone knows a Goth!

Featuring performances from Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Birthday Party, The Cure, Bauhaus, The Damned, Killing Joke, The Sisters of Mercy, The Cult, All About Eve and The Mission.

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Created 1 year, 9 months ago.

39 videos

Category Music

Music and shit, yeah?