old_mountainman

In this exciting sequel to the original video, a Pandora Moth (Coloradia pandora) caterpillar makes its way along an old, sun-bleached log, presumably looking for a way down to the ground, where it will bury itself and metamorphose into its adult stage next year.

The Flat Top Mountains, in northwest Colorado, overlay the Rockies, the result of lava flows some tens of millions of years after the Rocky Mountains were formed. They straddle two counties, and two national forests, with a roadless wilderness in the middle. I spent about three weeks there in July of 2017, first visiting the west side, then driving around them to come back in and visit the east side.

Here is a slideshow that my iPhone automatically generated from shots taken during that trip.

It's that time of year again. This Pandora Moth (Coloradia pandora) caterpillar wiggled its way through my campsite this afternoon, which they do at this time of year.

A pest species that is currently infesting central Oregon, they destroy pine forests. But they're cute. Normally the yellow bands are more brightly colored than this one, which has gotten itself all dirty.

The Forest Service wants to kill them all, but there is an Indian tribe in California that likes to roast and eat them (!), setting up somewhat of a political battle between the two.

Another slide show from my pro photography portfolio, autogenerated by my iPhone.

This one begins with shots taken on film thirty years ago. Oregon, California, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Idaho are represented.

Another slideshow automatically generated by my iPhone. This one takes in a 2010 trip through the Mojave National Preserve, Joshua Tree National Park, Valley of Fire State Park, and ending in Zion National Park.

The desert was in bloom, and there are lots of flower shots.

I had a can of peanuts on the picnic table that I was using to attract chipmunks for photography.

A golden-mantled ground squirrel found it, and being fearless, began to attack the can.

I filmed it, only running it off after it had achieved success.

Another slideshow automatically generated by my iPhone from photos in my portfolio.

This one mostly covers the Cascade Mountains in the southern half of the state, with a little bit of the Oregon Outback at the end.

Another slideshow auto-generated by my iPhone. This one, titled "Trips to Idanha," actually takes in shots taken over a 100-mile stretch of Oregon, including Idanha.

Many views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Jefferson, and Oregon's many high lakes. Also wild flora and fauna.

I have just discovered several slideshows that my iPhone has automatically generated, without my knowledge, from my portfolio.

I was on Colorado’s West Slope in September of 2015. This video samples shots I took there all that month, including several from the spectacular Silverjack Lake area at the peak of fall color.

iPhone-generated slideshow of shots taken in & around Onion Creek + Fisher Towers, 25 miles east of Moab. Includes a hideout allegedly used by Butch Cassidy. Also, many movies have been made here.

I keep my portfolio on my iPhone. Sometimes, my phone will make a slideshow in the middle of the night, from some stuff that is in my portfolio.

It's a little disturbing that my phone does things without me telling it to, but these are usually pretty cool. Here's the first one it did, a couple of years ago, from a day of shooting along the Burr Trail in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Capitol Reef National Park. I love the majestic music that it chose.

One of the double tops of a tree here in the RV park broke, threatening an internal power line. So a bunch of us guys proceeded to get it down.

The video begins with a view of the problem, after the powerline was cut and moved out of the way. Then a cable is thrown around it, it is weakened at its base with a chainsaw, and the rest is on Part 2.

With the cable slung around the tree, it was time to pull it down. And so, a John Deere skid-steer becomes a John Deere logging skidder for a day.

She sits in the window all day, griping about the snow & ice.

The Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) aka "Grey Jay" aka "Camp Robber" and called, in Canada, "Whisky Jacks" is a bird whose range includes the mountain portion of a few US western states. Notorious for their fearlessness, they have been known to steal food from a camper's plate while the camper is eating. When a flock comes by, I almost always give them something because they're so cute about their larceny. This video starts off with one taking a bit of a cracker that I had crumbled (because if I don't crumble it, the greedy bastards will take off with the entire cracker - I've seen them fly off with a whole slice of bread), followed by two minutes of slow-motion video of one who ate several pieces before flying off with a big one.

Falls at the head of the Rogue River Gorge, near Crater Lake, Oregon

GPS: 42.9104º N, 122.4412º W.

I had just arrived in Santa Fe for a 6-month job after a long and arduous journey from Oregon. My Jeep had been left in a shop along the way for repairs after a collision. The El Comal was walking distance from the RV park, so I went there for something to eat. And then these ladies walked in and started singing! I was impressed. I was going to like Santa Fe.

The City of Golden (Colorado) contains within its city limits a park for whitewater kayakers to practice their skills. Here is one of them.

Just Mama and Papa taking the little ones on a walk down to the river

Just 48 peaceful seconds of watching the "cotton" lazily falling from the cottonwoods at Santiam Flats Campground (USFS) near Detroit, Oregon

This cat. We had arrived at a remote, deserted RV park in the middle of nowhere, Utah and had the place to ourselves. I parked the Jeep a few feet away from the drivers' side of the RV, which is not typical. Pookie got on the Jeep and discovered the open window. So she just HAD to do it! Over and over. She would jump in, then go out the regular door, go around, and do it again. So I put the iPhone in slo-mo mode and got out of the way.

The snow is almost gone in the High Country, and it's time to send the sheep up there. These sheep were just unloaded from trucks here at Bear Lake Reservoir near Yampa, Colorado, and are being driven up to the Flat Top mountains where they will spend the summer grazing and making their way north. Sometime in September they will come out somewhere around Hayden, Colorado fat, happy and wooly.

When you're looking for a spot to camp... never go up a mountain road that you haven't been on before... especially in spring. Especially especially if the road goes up, and up, and up.

It's the road to Cottonwood Lake in Oregon's Fremont National Forest, and I myself had done the very same thing a few days earlier on this same road, farther back: had to turn around a motorhome because the road was still snowed in.

I was camped beside this road about a half mile back, waiting for the snow to melt, and I saw this RV going up the road. With a trailer (that had a BMW on it!). I knew they would need help, so I went up in my Jeep to render assistance.

He got his big thing turned around, but just barely.

Don't be this guy. Or me, a few days earlier.

My Pookie is an elderly tortie who loves camping and the outdoors. Here she walks along a log -- er, ah, I mean scratching post -- as she explores a recently-arrived-at campsite.

Proxy Falls, up the Old McKenzie Highway east of Eugene, road closed during winter. It's a ¾ mile hike each way from the trailhead at 44.1679º N, 121.9272º W. The trail is easy until the last eighth of a mile, where it becomes extreme. One of Oregon's most popular falls for photographers.

Parking area is almost always full, and you need a $5 permit from the Forest Service (available at the trailhead) to park.

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Created 6 months, 2 weeks ago.

32 videos

Category Travel

Various iPhone vids taken over the years. Many subjects/topics.