OldHorseman

OldHorseman

OldHorseman

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Hanna-Barbera was the 900 pound gorilla of TV cartoons, and relied heavily on knock-offs of previously successful characters and concepts. The closest thing to competition they had was Filmation, who also relied on characters who had previous success in other media... But they usually licensed theirs properly.

Considering that this was made for 1970s Saturday Morning TV, which had been mostly neutered by uptight wannabe social-workers, TARZAN, Lord of the Jungle managed to steer amazingly close to the original source material. (Yes, in the original stories, Tarzan was very intelligent and articulate, rather than the simple-minded savage of the movies.) They did have to tone the violence down to judo throws and such. Don't suppose it would have been acceptable for Tarzan to whip out a big knife and gut Lurch (who guest-voices in this episode).

They used rotoscoping to get realistic movement for Tarzan. These elements would be re-used throughout the show's run, then recycled in Filmation's Batman, He-Man, and other cartoons for years to come!

Interesting that this fanciful version of Africa features hidden cities full of white folks, usually in Greek-Roman costumes, not unlike the books... I suppose the classic Tarzan Movie bone-though-the-nose black natives weren't gonna cut it in September of 1976, when this, the first episode of the series was aired!

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Internet is still temperamental here, so I'll make it short this time...

Actually, this video was even more compact when it was circulating the 'net in those early years when SWF animations were about the only moving images we could reasonably transfer with our dial-up modems. It's a bit bulkier in modern, MP4 format.

This was a pretty good attempt at explaining the Zero Aggression Principle, which is the foundation of real civilization, in very simple terms for people who have been conditioned from childhood to accept the irrational belief that the smoke and mirrors of titles and fancy hats somehow make obviously criminal actions virtuous.

Of course, this kind of civilized philosophy breaks-down when we're overwhelmed by non-rational mobs. But it's still something to strive towards.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Kind of rushed this time. Weather has been trashing my Internet lately.

Godzilla had a bit of a resurgence in the 1970s. Even though the last of the Showa series was released in Japan in 1975, US releases lagged a bit, and GODZILLA vs MEGALON hag been much-hyped here. In a relatively rare licensing deal, Hanna-Barbera launched a cartoon series featuring their version of Japan's biggest star.

Actually, given how much their Godzilla diverged from the movie version, I half-suspect they were ready to rename him and do a knock-off series if Toho hadn't come to agreeable terms. No explanation was given to why Big G was attached to the Callico and her crew, or where his 'nephew' Godzooky came from. But at least this Junior G was less of a wuss than the Minya 'son of Godzilla' from the movies.

From Sept. 1978, the first episode of GODZILLA.

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Holy hourglass, Batman. It's already been 43 years?!?!

Anyway, had trouble finding the one from the 4th of July, but here's one about my youthful stomping grounds hosted by ol' Fritz Hollings, from the days when Democrats could still pass for marginally sane human beings.

And that's the way it was...

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

In the '60s, killjoy grownups bitched about violence in cartoons enough to create a trend where race & chase replaced the rough stuff for action. But that wasn't good enough for them, so they demanded cartoons become more educational...

Sealab 2020 was one of these "smarter" shows. I actually kinda' liked it at the time, but normal kids found it boring, so it was short-lived and mostly forgotten... Until the nuts at Adult Swim revamped it as the surreal comedy Sealab 2021 in the early 21st Century.

Here's the very first episode of the original Sealab 2020, from September 1972.

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Perhaps the best episode of The Twilight Zone, and one of the best episodes of television altogether, IMHO.

From the third season, January 1962.

Don't go nowhere they don't cotton to good dogs, y'all.

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Brock has turned the Office of Secret Intelligence's roster of top assassins into an obituary column. Molotov Cocktease helps him in the aftermath by sending in Mr. Clean. (Yeah, the bald dude from the commercials is apparently way more badass than we realized!)

General Treister (half-crazy, tough as nails, and probably Cotton Hill's bastard son) decides to lead the OSI mission to bring in Brock. Brock counters by manipulating the Monarch and his henchmen into battle with the OSI. All goes well until Sgt. Hatred gets into the act and things get too weird, even by Team Venture standards.

Season 3 Finale.

Revelations: Doc was forced to kill a man with a house key when he was ten years old... Sgt. Hatred once ate an entire Labrador Retriever. The Monarch's ultimate weapon works exactly as well as one would expect.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Dinosaurs were a bit of a pop-culture trend in the early 1970s. Hanna-Barbera rarely saw a bandwagon they didn't like, so they jumped-on with Valley of the Dinosaurs. A series in which a 20th Century family goes on a rafting adventure and somehow winds-up in a weird valley with dinosaurs and cave-people.

Unfortunately for Hanna-Barbera, their show wound-up going head-to-head with the Krofft brothers' Land of the Lost, which premiered at the same time and date, had the same premise, along with the novelty of being live-action. (Backed-up with stop-action animated dinosaurs, the odd puppet, forced perspective tricks, and lots of green screen.) LotL beat-out VotD pretty soundly... The_Doctor_2099 has many episodes of the Krofft series on his BitChute channel.

Of course, both series fared far better than KORG 70,000 BC. It didn't run directly against the dinosaur shows, but going half an hour later put it up against SHAZAM and Sigmund the Sea Monster. KORG was a scientifically realistic, live-action portrayal of Neanderthals, which meant it had a woeful lack of dinosaurs, and bit the dust pretty quick.

With parental groups bitching about the lack of educational value in children's TV, all of these shows managed to squeeze some in. (VotD may have been the least subtle about it.) Our 20th Century refugees got to explain and demonstrate basic science and tech to their Neanderthal friends as needed to survive in the Valley.

I always wondered if this was the same valley that Dino-Boy was lost in during his adventures in Hanna-Barbera's series from some years earlier. (Back-up segment in Space Ghost's show.) You'd think they might have stumbled across his bones or something.

Anyway... From September 1974, here is the very first episode of Valley of the Dinosaurs!

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Dinosaurs were a bit of a pop-culture trend in the early 1970s. Hanna-Barbera rarely saw a bandwagon they didn't like, so they jumped-on with Valley of the Dinosaurs. A series in which a 20th Century family goes on a rafting adventure and somehow winds-up in a weird valley with dinosaurs and cave-people.

Unfortunately for Hanna-Barbera, their show wound-up going head-to-head with the Krofft brothers' Land of the Lost, which premiered at the same time and date, had the same premise, along with the novelty of being live-action. (Backed-up with stop-action animated dinosaurs, the odd puppet, forced perspective tricks, and lots of green screen.) LotL beat-out VotD pretty soundly... The_Doctor_2099 has many episodes of the Krofft series on his BitChute channel.

Of course, both series fared far better than KORG 70,000 BC. It didn't run directly against the dinosaur shows, but going half an hour later put it up against SHAZAM and Sigmund the Sea Monster. KORG was a scientifically realistic, live-action portrayal of Neanderthals, which meant it had a woeful lack of dinosaurs, and bit the dust pretty quick.

With parental groups bitching about the lack of educational value in children's TV, all of these shows managed to squeeze some in. (VotD may have been the least subtle about it.) Our 20th Century refugees got to explain and demonstrate basic science and tech to their Neanderthal friends as needed to survive in the Valley.

I always wondered if this was the same valley that Dino-Boy was lost in during his adventures in Hanna-Barbera's series from some years earlier. (Back-up segment in Space Ghost's show.) You'd think they might have stumbled across his bones or something.

Anyway... From September 1974, here is the very first episode of Valley of the Dinosaurs!

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Molotov Cocktease arrives to tell Brock that he has indeed been marked for termination by the Office of Secret Intelligence (his own agency). She rejected the contract herself, but three of the deadliest assassins in the game are now hunting him. (Poor bastards.) The Mighty Monarch regains his Guild of Calamitous Intent sanction to arch Doc, but that's not why Sgt. Hatred is suffering a severe breakdown.

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Not all Americans have degenerated into candy-ass snowflakes hiding in safe spaces because somebody hurt their little feelings...

Hey kids! (And kids at heart!) It's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

In 1968, Hanna-Barbera (the 900# gorilla of TV cartoons) utilized the well-established idea of employing colorful hosts to liven-up a show filled with second-string material. (In this case, cartoons based on Public Domain properties.) For the host segments, they brought-in creative puppeteers Sid and Marty Krofft to design the amusement park mascot costumes and living clubhouse for the zany pop-rock band that hosted the show with slapstick skits and musical numbers.

This show, The Banana Splits, was a big hit for NBC. It also launched the Krofft's TV career, as they went on to do H.R. Puffnstuf and many other cartoon style live-action shows of their own.

The following year, Hanna-Barbera tried a variant of the formula for ABC. This time, staying in their own wheelhouse with an animated band, the Cattanooga Cats, performing songs and lead-ins for second-string cartoons. (Including another one based on a Public Domain property, and Hanna-Barbera's second, thinly-veiled rehash of the Tom & Jerry characters that had launched their partnership while working at MGM.)

The Cattanooga Cats Show didn't do nearly as well as the Banana Splits. But it did better than Hanna-Barbera's third run at the format, The Skatebirds, which flopped at CBS in 1977.

Here are the Cats in Witch Whacky, from the first episode of their show, broadcast in September 1969.

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Billy Quizboy thinks he's discovered clues in episodes of the old Rusty Venture cartoon (yeah, Doc's childhood adventures had been subject of cartoon series back in the 1970s within the world of The Venture Bros) and gets Team Venture, along with most of the Order of the Triad, involved in a quest that goes back to Doc's great-grandfather, the (originally beneficent) group that became the Guild of Calamitous Intent, and a struggle for power at the dawn of the 20th Century.

Brock discovered that his assignment to bodyguard Doc Venture wasn't quite what it seemed, and appears to have been fired and/or marked for assassination by the Office of Secret Intelligence.

"There is no good news! Only bad news, and WEIRD news!!!"

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Saturday Morning cartoon time again, kids!

The Beatles were arguably the greatest pop-culture phenomenon of the 1960s. Dominating and influencing the music scene. Making landmark TV appearances. Starring in movies. And even getting their own cartoon series. (Blazing a trail to be followed by the Jackson 5 and Osmond Brothers in the next decade.)

Of course, at the time, the Fab Four were too cool to be bothered with cartoons. (Though they got a laugh at them, looking back in later years.) So listen for familiar voice talents from other animated works.

This was one of the few copies I could find intact. The big video site has most versions with music muted or cut... Which is kinda' screwy, since you can find much better quality versions of the songs on that same site.

So here, from 1965, is the first episode of The Beatles' cartoon series.

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, The Mighty Monarch takes on his new nemesis: Jonas Venture Jr. Who turns out to be a drastically more competent protagonist than his brother, Doc. Monarch sends Henchmen 24 and 27, who (despite being utterly incompetent) are his best guys, on a covert mission to Spider Skull Island to make the best of the situation. Joining them is hyper-competent Henchman 1, whom they quickly peg as the equivalent of a Star Trek redshirt.

Despite his apparent Death By Sampson, Henchman 1 would be back (under new villain guises) in later seasons until he crossed Brock's path again.

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Saturday Morning cartoon time again, kids!

The last official "star" character (one who had his mug on the screen before the opening titles) during the golden age of cinema cartoon shorts was Humphrey Bear. He'd started out as a supporting character for Goofy and Donald Duck before being promoted. But Disney got out of cartoon shorts soon thereafter.

Humphrey was a forest park bear who didn't much care for rough living, and was always trying to find ways to enjoy human (or anthropomorphic duck) amenities, much to the consternation of the authority figure park ranger.

Hanna-Barbera studio's bread and butter was mass-producing TV cartoons which managed to have sufficient charm to be popular, but almost aggressively avoided originality. Almost everything they did was a knock-off of something that came before.

The first series they produced in its entirety starred Huckleberry Hound, essentially a re-skinned version of Southern Wolf, a character created by Tex Avery, their old colleague from MGM theatrical shorts. The show's back-up segments included Pixie and Dixie and Mr. Jinks, who were reincarnations of Tom, Jerry, and Nibbles from Hanna and Barbera's own MGM theatrical work. Then there was Yogi Bear... A thinly veiled Humphrey rehash. Pretty ballsy to steal from Disney. But they probably figured it was just a back-up segment on a lowly TV show, and Humphrey wasn't exactly Disney's brightest property. Even when Yogi was such a breakout character that he got to move headline his own show in a couple years, and many more in years to follow.

Yogi is a study on the classic Hanna-Barbera approach to adapting a character to TV animation. Obviously the character design was simplified and stylized. Humphrey didn't really speak, but it's faster and cheaper to have characters SAY funny things than to animate them DOING funny things, so Yogi was made verbose, with an imitation of Art Carney's Ed Norton voice. Humphrey was usually solo, but Yogi needed someone talk to, and was given a little buddy for the purpose.

Not only would Yogi himself go on to be featured in a long list of HB projects, he also served as the template for several likable animal vs authority figure cartoons produced by by the studio. Such as Squiddly Diddly, Magilla Gorilla, Wally Gator, and the Hair Bear Bunch.

Here is Yogi's first cartoon from September 1958...

The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Jonas Venture Jr. has converted Spider Skull Island into a museum commemorating his father, and Team Venture is attending the Grand Opening. Also the previous generation Team Venture, and some of their arch-nemeses... Which ends about like you'd expect!

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And this is BEFORE the multiple treasons committed as part of the Obama Administration.

Saturday morning cartoon time again kids!

In 1975, the Summer blockbuster movie came into being with JAWS. The Great White's bloody wake through popular culture left all manner of shark references. Before Fonzie could get around to jumping one on Happy Days, Hanna-Barbera featured one (with a Curly Howard imitator using Rodney Dangerfield's catch-phrase, no-less) in an undersea Josie and the Pussycats knock-off. Just as fast on the draw was DePatie-Freleng, who added MisterJaw as a back-up segment to their Pink Panther show on September 11, 1976. The same day HB's Jabberjaw hit the airwaves.

Here we have MisterJaw's first appearance, Flying Fool.

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode,the Guild of Calamitous Intent pushes the Mighty Monarch to arch new enemies. But his heart totally isn't in it. So he just straight-up murders them. (Apparently, you're not really supposed to do that.)

Being an insufferably lame protagonist AND being brutally murdered by the Monarch wasn't sufficient to keep Dr. Dugong from playing a big role in the series events in recent seasons. We would learn years later that the Boom-Broom Doc was off in Washington demonstrating during this episode got him banned from the Science Now conference. Seems they weren't keen on an atomic vacuum cleaner that leaked radiation, even if it could clean the leaked radiation up itself!

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Saturday Morning Cartoon time again kiddies!

Hanna-Barbera was the 900 pound gorilla of TV animation. They did some licensed characters, but their stock and trade was thinly veiled knock-offs of characters and concepts that had already been successful elsewhere.

The closest thing to competition they had was Filmation, who had essentially the opposite approach. Their bread and butter was properly licensed properties (Star Trek, Archies, Fat Albert, etc.) with a few original character based series thrown-in.

In 1975, Filmation tried something new. A hosted kids' show (akin to Bozo, Captain Kangaroo, Howdy Doody) that was also a parody of the genre. Despite featuring the talents of Charles Nelson Reilly, Jonathan Harris, and Phyllis Diller (who have Krofft's "Lidsville", Filmation's "Space Academy", and Hanna-Barbera's "New Scooby Movies" among their Saturday Morning credits), "Uncle Croc's Block" was a colossal failure, and was axed by ABC before its one season of production could be completed.

During his short run, Uncle Croc hosted three regular cartoon segments. This one, "Fraidy Cat", features a feline who is understandably nervous due to having already burned through eight of his nine lives. Making matters worse, any time he says a number, the ghost of one of his previous lives comes to haunt him! From the first episode of Uncle Croc.

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Team Venture discovers a rather disturbing legacy of the previous generation Team Venture right under their feet! Hank and Dean call in The Order of the Triad, and well as Pete White, to help sort things out, which doesn't quite result in nuclear holocaust.

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Saturday Morning Cartoon time again kiddies!

All In The Family was a big deal in the early '70s. Even the cartoon studios tried to get a piece of Archie Bunker's action, despite the inherently adult nature of the show.

Hanna-Barbera even took two bites of the apple. The short-lived Roman Holidays used the Flintstones template of putting an ersatz version of an established property's characters and relationships into an anachronistic setting. (Flintstones were The Honeymooners in a modern stone age. Jetsons were Dagwood & Blondie in a contemporary-style Future.) Wait Till Your Father Gets Home was a prime-time animated sitcom that did much better for them.

Meanwhile, DePatie-Freleng, best known for The Pink Panther, got into the act with the Barkleys. Fully anthropomorphic dog counterparts to the Bunker clan. Of course, toned-down for the Saturday Morning crowd. The patriarch was voiced by a guy who would go on the take over the role of Fred Flintstone for many years. Small world, as Fred was based on the Ralph Kramden character from the Honeymooners, and The Barkleys had The Honeymooners as a secondary inspiration, making the father a bus driver, like Ralph.

The Barkleys ran one short season, and was mostly forgotten. This is the first episode from 1972.

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Since nobody reads articles anymore, I'm going to try and get with the times and start doing some videos.

This one is an intro for the Low-Nonsense Doomsteading project.
https://oldhorseman.livejournal.com/

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The Venture Bros. has been around for seven seasons over fifteen years, an underappreciated gem of an animated series.

Originally a parody of the 1960s Hanna-Barbera animated adventure show Jonny Quest, the the Venture Bros. has gone on to affectionately rag on pretty much every aspect of pop (especially nerd) culture, and has established a mind-boggling continuity and expansive universe.

In this episode, Team Venture travels deep into the jungle to... uh... steal a native fertility fetish and train an ape to prize fight. Both of these endeavors work out about as well as one might expect. Yet Doc, Brock, and the Venture Brothers all somehow find weird and uncomfortable ROMANTIC adventure in this primitive, wereodile-infested setting. (Like a werewolf, but with a crocodile instead of the wolf part.)

Dig the flashbacks to Jonas Venture Sr.'s swinging party for some incredible foreshadowing the would pay off many years later in the series!

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Created 11 months, 1 week ago.

86 videos

CategoryAnime & Animation

This channel is just for stuff I dig and think could use a little more exposure... And to test the BitChute platform for an original content channel later.

If I post something that belongs to you and you've got a problem with it, just be cool and let me know. Not trying to step on anyone's toes here.

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