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Well, it wouldn't be Christmas without at least one version of Charles Dickens' A CHRISTMAS CAROL. I'd decided to use this one before discovering that its star, Albert Finney, passed-away this year at 82 years of age. He was only in his early 30s when this film was shot, allowing him to play Scrooge both as an old man (with very good make-up) and in his younger days.

I'm not the biggest fan of musicals, but have to admit some of the songs featured are damned catchy. "I HATE PEOPLE" resonates a bit too much, methinks. Trying to move more toward "I Like Life", though it's rather like trying to ice skate uphill.

This print does contain the "Scrooge In Hell" segment that has often been edited-out on television. This is probably done because the imagery is too scary for kids. I can actually see taking it out because Obi-Wan Kenobi... er... I mean Jacob Marley is far out of character here, and the Hell depicted contradicts the nature of Hell seen earlier in the movie.

So here from 1970 is SCROOGE.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again! Christmas-style, even!

When Warner Bros. shut down their animation department in the early 1960s, they let studio stalwart Friz Freleng and his partner David DePatie take over the facilities. One of their first big breaks was doing the animated opening credits for a Blake Edwards movie, which featured a certain cotton-candy colored feline who went on to become a cartoon star in his own right... By far the best one introduced in the 1960s. He'd have a good run in the dying theatrical short medium before becoming a fixture on television for decades to come.

The usually cool and clever Pink Panther is a bit off his game in this 1978 Christmas special, broke and hungry in a big, cold city. (The Carter-era economy was a real bitch for everyone, it seems!) Poor guy literally can't even get arrested at one point. Of course, it's Christmas, so things work out in the end...

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MARRIED... WITH CHILDREN was was a groundbreaking documentary series delving into the true nature of American family life in the 1980s and '90s. This entry from 1987 was the first (and best) of several annual episodes dealing with the way a typical household celebrated the Christmas holiday.

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John Denver from 1973's FAREWELL ANDROMEDA. Written by Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert.

Second try...

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John Denver from 1973's FAREWELL ANDROMEDA. Written by Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert.

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"Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis" is a song written and performed by Tom Waits, released on his 1978 album, Blue Valentine.

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Well, we saw Ol' St. Nick in the big parade, so the Christmas Season is officially upon us.

Of course I'll be trying to post Holly Jolly videos again this year, but the channel already has a bunch from last year that shouldn't be overlooked.

Last year we covered Scrooges animated and live action, drinkin' and revenge in the name of the holiest man ever to slap leather, living snowmen, desiccated grapes Motown holiday music, an anthropomorphic mouse-nerd wrecking and then struggling to save Christmas, Team Venture doing about as well as you'd expect, Mexico's acid-trip Santa fighting it out with the freakin' Devil, a bloodbath battle involving elves / reindeer / moonshiners, and everyone's favorite cat and mouse demonstrating a little actual good will.

Direct links to previous years' Christmas uploads...

Tom and Jerry The Night Before Christmas
https://www.bitchute.com/video/Re1AIY2K83nR/

Santa Claus vs The Devil.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/8NbM7tGmSLgy/

A Very Venture Christmas.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/MPMzoOImn55E/

'Twas The Night Before Christmas 1974 Rankin Bass
https://www.bitchute.com/video/HPDYyMySNDFZ/

Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/Uqmm07f2aK3x/

Feast of Alvis. Sealab 2021
https://www.bitchute.com/video/GaByQhCxAwmp/

For Whom The Sleigh Bell Tolls. American Dad.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/oAkhvQp6mWHq/

Claymation Christmas Celebration.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/jRjD8NSk7R6V/

Christmas Story. Andy Griffith (1960)
https://www.bitchute.com/video/5Yflmom8L3e7/

Scrooge. (1951)
https://www.bitchute.com/video/vg8viiaOrEfh/

Frosty's Winter Wonderland.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/2cz299NjpW55/

Do It Yourself, Mr. Bean. (New Year Episode.)
https://www.bitchute.com/video/v4bvcHta3Egg/

When STAR WARS (just plain Star Wars, that 'Episode IV' stuff was tacked on years later) was released in 1977, nobody knew it was going to be a huge hit and cultural phenomenon. Lucas himself was kinda' hoping it would do well enough for a TV movie / series pilot follow-up. (His outline for which was reworked as the first Star Wars spin-off novel SPLINTER OF THE MIND'S EYE.) The massive success of the movie meant that Lucas would be doing a big-budget theatrical sequel that would take years to produce...

The folks at 20th Century Fox were probably terrified that, by the time the sequel came out, the fickle public would have lost interest. So the idea of a TV event to keep the Star Wars juggernaut going seemed like a winner to them and CBS. So the core cast was reassembled, various sitcom and variety show stars and writers were brought-in, and several tractor-trailer loads of high-grade cocaine were dispatched to make the project happen.

Sidestepping the theological issue of whether the inhabitants of a galaxy long ago and far, far away would know about Jesus and celebrate his birthday, a generic Life Day was created for the Space Sasquatches so that we could have a "Holiday Special".

Despite the two hours of glassy-eyed whatthefuckery that resulted, The Special actually contributed to the Star Wars mythos. Giving us the name of the Wookie planet, introducing Boba Fett (in an animated segment, no-less) and more.

And it's still better than the pointless, woke garbage that is the Disney sequel trilogy. But it was aired only once in November 1978 before all parties decided to pretend it never happened.

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(This was supposed to be up for Saturday Morning, but BitChute seems to be having issues...)

Holy cranberry sauce... It's already the last Saturday Morning before Thanksgiving!

Garfield started as a newspaper comic strip in '76, went national in '78. Not topical. Rarely LOL funny. But consistently good for at least a half-smile. Overweight, under-motivated, and totally okay with it. A lot of us can identify with the ornery cat. So he became a worldwide star. Got a Saturday morning show in '88, and a bunch of prime-time specials, including this one from '89.

Garfield is still a billion dollar property, in thousands of newspapers, with another TV series in the works... So somebody added a few minutes of random clips after the credits on this video to make it a little harder for the corporate 'bots to identify it on a certain other video sharing site. Just ignore that bit.

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Thanksgiving (our American version) is coming-up fast. Sadly tends to get pushed out of the way as retailers can't wait to get to the lucrative Christmas season. (Humbug... BAH!)

In the midst of the crime and recession-plagued 1970s, ABC started a TV series about NYC police captain and his struggle to find balance between his life on the job and his family life at home... The antics of the colorful cast of characters down at the Ol' One-Two Precinct quickly overshadowed the Miller family aspect of the show. Soon it was forgotten and most episodes took place entirely in the squad room and Miller's adjacent office.

This Thanksgiving episode of BARNEY MILLER takes place in 1977, during the program's fourth season (of eight).

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

And now Thanksgiving is approaching fast. Because Saturday Morning cartoons were expected to be run in a loop, they usually avoided seasonal episodes. So Thanksgiving themed shows are scarce. But one early producer of TV cartoons, Total Television, which started out creating advertisement for sugary cereals, has us covered. They outsourced their animation work to Gamma Studios in Mexico, which also did work for Jay Ward Productions (BULLWINKLE).

Here Political Incorrectness abounds, as we not only have a Thanksgiving story featuring stereotypical Hollywood injuns, but we throw-in some COMMANDER McBRAGG and GO GO GOPHERS for good measure.

So here, from November 1965, is UNDERDOG and his unreasonably epic theme song!

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

And now Thanksgiving is approaching fast. Because Saturday Morning cartoons were expected to be run in a loop, they usually avoided seasonal episodes. So Thanksgiving themed shows are scarce. But one early producer of TV cartoons, Total Television, which started out creating advertisement for sugary cereals, has us covered. They outsourced their animation work to Gamma Studios in Mexico, which also did work for Jay Ward Productions (BULLWINKLE).

Here Political Incorrectness abounds, as we not only have a Thanksgiving story featuring stereotypical Hollywood injuns, but we throw-in some COMMANDER McBRAGG and GO GO GOPHERS for good measure.

So here, from November 1965, is UNDERDOG and his unreasonably epic theme song!

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What happens when you're brilliant enough to come up with a game-changing idea that could be a boon to future generations? Not what you might think.

It's enough to make a guy wanna go hide in a cave on a desolate, desert planet until he gets the chance to commit suicide by Seven-Foot Cyborg Samurai Grim Reaper.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

I mentioned last week that CASPER AND THE ANGELS was Hanna-Barbera's second bite off the CHARLIE'S ANGELS apple. Here is their first.

Ever-economical Hanna-Barbera recycled one of the Slag Brother's character design from WACKY RACES (1968), put a cape on it, and made him a superhero. Thawed-out in the Disco Era and teamed with three teenage girls solving mysteries along the lines of SCOOBY-DOO, like so many HB cartoons from the 1970s.

Cavey and the girls even started out as a part of SCOOBY'S ALL-STAR LAFF-A-LYMPICS big cartoon block (also appearing as contestants in the Laff-A-Lympic segments), and stayed-on when it was shortened to SCOOBY'S ALL-STARS the next year. Then they got their own show in 1980. Ultimately, forty adventures were produced.

Cavey went on to appear as a regular in a couple of the later Saturday Morning FLINTSTONES programs, presumably set before he got frozen for his trip to the 20th Century.

Here is the first episode of CAPTAIN CAVEMAN AND THE TEEN ANGELS from September 1977.

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Now that we've got Hallowe'en out of the way, how about some REAL horror? As in, what happens to once glorious pieces of Western Civilization when non-Whites become the dominant political force and elect Marxists (aka Democrats) decade after decade?

(And no. There won't be a "Blexit"... No matter how badly the Democrats really treat the melanin-enhanced folk, they'll always vote for the Free Stuff.)

With the last of the off-year elections in America out of the way, we need to keep this message in-view for 2020. When this was made, the Trump Train hadn't really left the station, and it looked like the USA was going the way of Detroit. We could get right back on that highway to Hell if we're not careful.

Bill Whittle's FIREWALL form March, 2016.
Note that he has his own channel here on BitChute. https://www.bitchute.com/channel/bill-whittle/
I just thought this "golden oldie" needed another spin.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Just a little post-Hallowe'en methadone... I recently uploaded THERE'S GOOD BOOS TO-NIGHT, Casper the Friendly Ghost's second, and most horrific, animated appearance from 1948. A stark contrast to the chipper, sugar-coated, disco-era Casper featured in this show.

I'm not sure how or why Hanna-Barbera got the license on Casper, but their usual inclinations for bandwagon-jumping and thinly-veiled knock-offs were on display, as this program is a crazy quilt of lifted elements...

First, they put Casper into Outer Space, as they had previously done to JOSIE AND THE PUSSYCATS and the PARTRIDGE FAMILY. (GILLIGAN'S PLANET came later, and was Filmation's doing.) Then they borrowed the LAVERNE & SHIRLEY characters, and chucked-in some CHiPs and CHARLIE'S ANGELS. (Their second bite off the latter's apple, having done CAPTAIN CAVEMAN AND THE TEEN ANGELS a year or two earlier.)

They got one production season, a Hallowe'en and a Christmas Special out of it.

So here, from September 1979, is the first episode of CASPER AND THE ANGELS.

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Halloween festivities continue with a weirdly scary one...

The Fleischers got their start by developing rotoscoping, an ancestor of today's motion-capture animation. To demonstrate it, they created Ko-Ko the Clown. Ko-Ko went on to be their primary cartoon star in the silent era. He was given a semi-anthropomorphic dog sidekick named Fitz. Fitz would evolve through various forms into the fully-anthropomorphic (which is to say essentially a vaguely dog-shaped, functionally human character) Bimbo, who was the studio's lead star going into the sound era. Bimbo would get a girlfriend who would evolve to become completely human as the Fleischers' biggest original star, Betty Boop. By that point, Ko-Ko was reduced to cameos and supporting roles in Betty Boop shorts. But he did make a brief comeback on syndicated TV in the early 1960s, voiced by Larry Storch. Often featured on your local hosted kiddie shows.

Beyond the usual creepiness of silent-era cartoons and the nightmare fuel common to early Fleischer work, this short qualifies for a Halloween showing by featuring the Devil himself, a Tree Monster, and the most evil character of them all: Fitz the Dog, who is literally hellbent to pull the Destroy The World lever.

What idiot keeps installing "Blow Us All To Atoms" levers in the first place?! (See the end of BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN)!

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On the home stretch to Hallowe'en, so maybe a few extra uploads coming!

Fleischer Studios was unique and innovative, bringing us such original characters as Koko the Clown, Bimbo, and Betty Boop. (See my previous upload.) They also brought licensed characters like Popeye and Superman to the screen in such memorable fashion that the comic page originals wound up being strongly by the theatrical adaptations.

But, by the 1940s, the studio had overextended itself and got taken-over by its distributor and primary financier, Paramount Pictures. Rebranded as Famous Studios, their cartoon production values were maintained, perhaps improved. But the place was now run by corporate suits rather than animation pioneers, and the lack of creative spark did show.

Most of the Famous characters were either carry-overs from the Fleischer era or inferior knock-offs of existing properties. The only one who really made an impact was CASPER. Introduced in a forgotten children's book in 1939, the studio bought the rights and made what was probably intended as a one-off cartoon called THE FRIENDLY GHOST in 1945. This short featured Casper so distraught with loneliness that he attempts suicide, and only fails due to already being dead! It was around three years before Famous did this second short... Which is even darker and more disturbing than the first one.

Of course, they lightened the tone and dialed way back on Casper's depression after this. But I wonder if the suicidal inclination was what got him trapped between worlds as a ghost instead of moving on to heaven!
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On the home stretch to Hallowe'en, so maybe a few extra uploads coming!

Fleischer Studios dates back to the primordial era of theatrical animation. Unlike most everyone else, who wound up aping Disney in the '30s, they had their own gritty style. One that often seemed to run on High-Octane Nightmare Fuel. (And maybe cocaine or opium.)

In the silent era, they introduced Koko the Clown to demonstrate their invention (rotoscoping). His sidekick dog Fitz evolved (in very irregular steps) into Bimbo, their initial sound-era star. Bimbo's girlfriend ultimately evolved from anthropomorphic dog to fully human as Betty Boop, Fleischer's best-known original character.

Here we see all three characters in a version of Snow White that predates Disney's color feature film by a few years. You may recall that film had some spooky scenes. Well, this one-reel short has no deficiencies in that department either.

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By request... The IMPOSSIBLES were the backup segment to FRANKENSTEIN JR. back in 1966. (See previous upload.)

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again, Hallowe'en-style!

Hanna-Barbera studio's early TV shows tended to feature funny animals in theatrical-length (six or seven minute) cartoons, packaged three to a half-hour episode. This format was handy, as it allowed the segments to be recycled into other shows later. Even as they started doing action and superhero cartoons in the mid 1960s, they often continued the practice.

FRANKENSTEIN JR. AND THE IMPOSSIBLES were sort of transitional from the YOGI BEAR era to BIRDMAN AND THE GALAXY TRIO type adventures.

Frankenstein Jr. was a giant, fully robotic (but apparently self-aware and intelligent), superhero version of Ol' Boltneck. He's activated by a kid who directs the big lug to battle evildoers in fairly simplistic stories. Possibly cribbed (as Hanna-Barbera was want to do) from GIGANTOR, though Franky had more personality. Both cartoons predate the similar GIANT ROBO (JOHNNY SOKKO).

Each Frankenstein Jr. segment was sandwiched between two cartoons featuring The Impossibles, a rock band trio that transformed into goofy superheroes. They were forgotten after the series ended after one 18 episode production season and two years on the broadcast schedule. But their costume design and odd superpowers were reused in later cartoons, most notably 1979's SUPER GLOBETROTTERS.

Frankenstein Jr replaced DINO BOY as the backup segment to SPACE GHOST when his show was recycled as a mid-season replacement on the 1976/77 NBC Saturday Morning lineup.

So here, from September 1966, is the first-ever FRANKENSTEIN JR. cartoon.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again, Hallowe'en-style!

It's rare that I like an updated/rebooted version of a cartoon better than the original, but it does happen. The macabre characters first introduced in Charles Addams' magazine comic made their way to live-action television in 1964, then invaded Saturday Morning Cartoons with a guest shot on THE NEW SCOOBY MOVIES in 1972, which served as a backdoor pilot to their own animated series the following year.

The 1973 ADDAMS FAMILY cartoon put the cast in creepy RV on an ongoing road-trip. Hanna-Barbera turned-out one production season of sixteen episodes. (Moved to a less-desirable time slot for a second season of reruns, which was par for the course in cartoonland at the time.)

The success of the live-action feature film THE ADDAMS FAMILY in 1991 prompted Hanna-Barbera to bring the characters back to Saturday Morning, this time in their traditional creepy mansion. By the '90s, the killjoy watchdogs who had watered-down the fun in the '70s had less influence, so the new cartoon got to be a bit more ghoulish and violent than the first had been. The show rated two production seasons for a total of twenty-one episodes.

So here, from September 1992, is the first episode of the second animated ADDAMS FAMILY.

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It's October and Hallowe'en festivities continue!

As Uncle Arthur from BEWITCHED, Paul Lynde was already used to the company of witches. So he should have been right at home with Margaret Hamilton, the Wicked Witch of the West from THE WIZARD OF OZ and Billie Hayes, Witchiepoo from HR PUFFNSTUFF, as they join him in this ABC special program.

Also prominently featured are KISS, who were exploding (literally!) onto the pop culture scene at the time. Roz Kelly, who was supposed to be a rising star, was billed as "Pinky Tuscadero", denoting her 15 minutes of fame from HAPPY DAYS. On the opposite end of the scale was an appearance by Betty White, who has been a TV star continuously from the earliest experimental broadcast stations right through to today!

This somehow wasn't officially a Krofft production, but it sure looked like one. Not only did it feature Witchiepoo (a Krofft character), but also several regulars from Krofft shows including Florence Henderson, Billy Barty, Donny and Marie Osmond.

So, from October 1976, here's the PAUL LYNDE HALLOWEEN SPECIAL.

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Hey kids (of all ages), it's Saturday Morning Cartoon time again, Hallowe'en-style!

Since I did the (Filmation) GHOSTBUSTERS last week, I reckon this is obligatory. Unlike Filmation's cartoon, which was ostensibly based on their 1975 live-action GHOST BUSTERS series, this one is a direct adaptation of the 1984 GHOSTBUSTERS hit feature film. Complete with the chart-topping theme song.

The "Real" added to the title was a poke at the competing Filmation show. This first episode even has the heroes coping with a cheap imitation ghost-catching business. Columbia / DIC didn't have much to worry about though. While the gorilla-infested Filmation series was forgotten after one batch of episodes, the "real" version wound up on Saturday Mornings and syndication, with multiple seasons of episodes produced, a sequel show, comic books, etc...

So here is the first episode of THE REAL GHOSTBUSTERS from September 1986.

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It's October and Hallowe'en festivities continue!

Bela Lugosi (see my last mid-week upload) gave us the iconic version of Count Dracula in 1931. Though Lon Chaney Jr. and John Carradine also played the role in Universal films, there was no real challenge to Lugosi's legacy until two years after his death.

Francis Lederer portrayed a rather modernized iteration of the Transylvanian bloodsucker, using a bit of murder and identity theft to slip into then-contemporary 1950s America. Though the "Return" in the title suggests a sequel, this off-brand film has no connection to the Universal classics that preceded it, or any other Drac film. (Unless you count Lederer reprising the role in one episode of the NIGHT GALLERY television show.)

While it's a pretty good flick, this one was mostly forgotten when Hammer Studios' HORROR OF DRACULA came out a matter of weeks later and curb-stomped it mercilessly... I mean, Hammer had Christopher Lee (Great Wizard of Middle Earth, Sith Lord, and real-world badass, legit Heavy Metal artist, and Knight.) AND Peter Cushing (Dr. Frankenstein, Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Who, Grand Moff Tarkin.) Not to mention glorious full color, hot babes with great cleavage, and full fang-fu. It wasn't even close to a fair fight.

So here is RETURN OF DRACULA. aka CURSE OF DRACULA (TV title) and THE FANTASTIC DISAPPEARING MAN (Because the UK distributor must've been quite drunk.)

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Created 1 year, 4 months ago.

138 videos

CategoryAnime & Animation

This channel is just for stuff I dig and think could use a little more exposure... And to test the BitChute platform for an original content channel later.

If I post something that belongs to you and you've got a problem with it, just be cool and let me know. Not trying to step on anyone's toes here.

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