Rea's Creature Features!

Night of the Creeps is a 1986 American science fiction horror comedy film written and directed by Fred Dekker in his feature directorial debut, starring Jason Lively, Jill Whitlow, and Tom Atkins. The film is an earnest attempt at a B movie and an homage to the genre. While the main plot of the film is related to zombies, the film also mixes in takes on slashers and alien invasion films. Night of the Creeps did not perform well at the box office, but it developed a cult following.[2]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Creeps

Return of the Killer Tomatoes! is a 1988 American parody film[2] directed by John De Bello. The first sequel to the 1978 film Attack of the Killer Tomatoes,[3] the film stars Anthony Starke, Karen Mistal, and John Astin, as well as George Clooney in an early role. The film has developed a cult following.[4]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_of_the_Killer_Tomatoes

C.H.U.D. is a 1984 American science fiction horror film directed by Douglas Cheek, produced by Andrew Bonime, and starring John Heard, Daniel Stern, and Christopher Curry in his film debut. The plot concerns a New York City police officer and a homeless shelter manager who join forces to investigate a series of disappearances, and discover the missing are taken by humanoid monsters that live below the city.

The title of the movie stands for Cannibalistic Humanoid Underground Dwellers.

The film was released in North America on August 31, 1984 and grossed $4.7 million. It was followed in 1989 by C.H.U.D. II: Bud the C.H.U.D..

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C.H.U.D.

Ice Cream Man is a 1995 American horror comedy television film[1] produced and directed by Norman Apstein, written by Sven Davison and David Dobkin, and starring Clint Howard, Olivia Hussey, and David Naughton. The plot follows a deranged man recently released from a psychiatric institution who opens an ice cream factory where he begins using human flesh in his recipes.

The film had an estimated $2 million budget and was released direct-to-video, and in recent years has developed a cult following among viewers who see it as an unintentional comedy, and enjoy it for its campy production values. Joe Bob Briggs hosted the film on TNT, when it was shown on MonsterVision. Howard himself made an appearance, discussing the film with Briggs. It was released on DVD in 2004.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Cream_Man_(film)

Swamp Thing is a 1982 American Technicolor superhero horror film written and directed by Wes Craven, based on the Vertigo/DC Comics character of the same name created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson. It tells the story of scientist Alec Holland (Ray Wise) who becomes transformed into the monster the Swamp Thing (Dick Durock) through laboratory sabotage orchestrated by the evil Anton Arcane (Louis Jourdan). Later, he helps a woman named Alice Cable (Adrienne Barbeau) and battles the man responsible for it all, the ruthless Arcane. It was followed by a sequel, The Return of Swamp Thing, in 1989.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_Thing_(film)

In the Mouth of Madness is a 1994 American horror film directed and scored by John Carpenter and written by Michael De Luca. It stars Sam Neill, Julie Carmen, Jürgen Prochnow, David Warner and Charlton Heston. Informally, the film is the third installment in Carpenter's Apocalypse Trilogy, preceded by The Thing and Prince of Darkness.[2]

Maximum Overdrive is a 1986 American comedy horror film written and directed by Stephen King.[5] The film stars Emilio Estevez, Pat Hingle, Laura Harrington, and Yeardley Smith. The screenplay was inspired by and loosely based on King's short story "Trucks", which was included in the author's first collection of short stories, Night Shift.

Maximum Overdrive is King's only directorial effort, though dozens of films have been based on his novels or short stories. The film contained black humor elements and a generally campy tone, which contrasts with King's sombre subject matter in books. The film has a mid-1980s hard rock soundtrack composed entirely by the group AC/DC, King's favorite band. AC/DC's album Who Made Who was released as the Maximum Overdrive soundtrack. It includes the best-selling singles "Who Made Who", "You Shook Me All Night Long", and "Hells Bells".

The film was nominated for two Golden Raspberry Awards including Worst Director for King and Worst Actor for Estevez in 1987, but both lost against Prince for Under the Cherry Moon. In 1988, Maximum Overdrive was nominated for "Best Film" at the International Fantasy Film Awards.[6] King eventually disowned the film and described it as a "moron movie". He considers the process a learning experience,[7] after which he intended never to direct again.[8]

They Live is a 1988 American science-fiction action horror film written and directed by John Carpenter, based on the 1963 short story "Eight O'Clock in the Morning" by Ray Nelson, and starring Roddy Piper, Keith David, and Meg Foster. It follows an unnamed drifter[nb 1] who discovers through special sunglasses that the ruling class are aliens concealing their appearance and manipulating people to spend money, breed, and accept the status quo with subliminal messages in mass media.

The film was a minor success at the time of its release, debuting #1 at the North American box office. It originally received negative reviews criticizing its social commentary, writing and acting. However, like other films of Carpenter, it later enjoyed a cult following and eventually became recognized as a largely underrated work. The film has also entered popular culture, and notably had a lasting impact on street art (particularly that of Shepard Fairey), while its near six-minute alley brawl between the protagonists makes appearances on all-time lists for best fight scenes.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula is a 1973 horror film directed by Alan Gibson and produced by Hammer Film Productions. It is the eighth film in Hammer's Dracula series, and the seventh and final one to feature Christopher Lee as Dracula. The film was also the third to unite Peter Cushing as Van Helsing with Lee, following Dracula (1958) and Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972).

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Satanic_Rites_of_Dracula

The Trollenberg Terror (a.k.a. The Crawling Eye in the United States) is a 1958 independently made British black-and-white science fiction monster film drama, produced by Robert S. Baker and Monty Berman, directed by Quentin Lawrence, that stars Forrest Tucker, Laurence Payne, Jennifer Jayne, and Janet Munro. The special effects were handled by Les Bowie.[2] The story was based on a 1956 British ITV "Saturday Serial" television programme[3] written by George F. Kerr, Jack Cross and Giles Cooper, under the collective pseudonym of "Peter Key." The film was distributed in the U.K. by Eros Films Ltd. in October, 1958[4] as The Trollenberg Terror, and in the U.S. by Distributors Corporation of America as The Crawling Eye. It was released in the U.S. on July 7, 1958[5] as a double feature with the British science fiction film The Strange World of Planet X (a.k.a. Cosmic Monsters in the United States).

The Trollenberg Terror's storyline concerns United Nations troubleshooter Alan Brooks, later joined by journalist Philip Truscott, investigating unusual accidents occurring in the area of a resort hotel on (the fictional) Mount Trollenberg in Switzerland. Brooks suspects these deaths are related to a series of similar incidents that occurred three years earlier in the Andes Mountains, which involved an unexplained radioactive mist and an odd cloud formation believed by locals to be inhabited.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trollenberg_Terror

The Deadly Mantis is a 1957 American science-fiction monster film produced by William Alland for Universal-International. The film was directed by Nathan Juran from a screenplay by Martin Berkeley based on a story by producer William Alland.[3] The Deadly Mantis stars Craig Stevens, William Hopper, Alix Talton and Pat Conway.[4]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Deadly_Mantis

Demonstrating that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, a convicted strangler studies the paranormal and finds a way to render himself invisible. Once he escapes, he sets out to find and eliminate the five women who testified in his prosecution. A police lieutenant (Robert Foxworth) sets out to safeguard them, and bring the invisible killer to justice.

For more info click on the link: https://www.allhorror.com/movies/the-astral-factor

Prophecy is a 1979 American science fiction/horror film directed by John Frankenheimer and written by David Seltzer. It stars Robert Foxworth, Talia Shire and Armand Assante. Set in the Androscoggin or Ossipee River, the film follows an environmental agent and his wife filing a report on a paper mill in the river, not knowing that the paper mill's waste made a local bear mutate, causing the bear to run amok in the wilderness.

A novelization of the film, written by Seltzer as well, was also published, with the tagline "A Story of Unrelenting Terror".

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prophecy_(film)

The Omen is a 1976 American-British supernatural horror film directed by Richard Donner, written by David Seltzer, and starring Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, David Warner, Harvey Spencer Stephens, Billie Whitelaw, Patrick Troughton, Martin Benson, and Leo McKern. Its plot follows Damien Thorn, a young child replaced at birth by an American ambassador unbeknownst to his wife, after their biological child dies shortly after birth; as a series of mysterious events and violent deaths occur around the family as Damien enters childhood, they come to learn he is in fact the prophesied "666" Antichrist.

Released theatrically by 20th Century Fox in June 1976, The Omen received mixed reviews from critics and was a commercial success, grossing over $60 million at the U.S. box office and becoming one of the highest-grossing films of 1976. The film earned two Oscar nominations, and won for Best Original Score for Jerry Goldsmith, his only Oscar win. A scene from the film appeared at #16 on Bravo's The 100 Scariest Movie Moments. The film spawned a franchise, starting with Damien: Omen II, released two years later, followed by a third installment, Omen III: The Final Conflict, in 1981, and in 1991 with Omen IV: The Awakening. A remake was released in 2006.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Omen

Psycho is a 1960 American psychological horror film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and written by Joseph Stefano. It stars Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, John Gavin, Vera Miles, and Martin Balsam, and was based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The film centers on an encounter between a secretary, Marion Crane (Leigh), who ends up at a secluded motel after stealing money from her employer, and the motel's owner-manager, Norman Bates (Perkins), and its aftermath.[8]

Psycho was seen as a departure from Hitchcock's previous film North by Northwest, having been filmed on a low budget, in black-and-white, and by a television crew. The film initially received mixed reviews, but outstanding box-office returns prompted critical reevaluation. Psycho was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Supporting Actress for Leigh and Best Director for Hitchcock.

Psycho is now considered one of Hitchcock's best films[9] and praised as a major work of cinematic art by international film critics and scholars. Often ranked among the greatest films of all time, it set a new level of acceptability for violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films,[10] and is widely considered to be the earliest example of the slasher film genre.

After Hitchcock's death in 1980, Universal Studios began producing follow-ups: three sequels, a remake, a made-for-television spin-off, and a prequel television series set in the 2010s. In 1992, the Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.[11]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psycho_(1960_film)

The Astounding She-Monster is a 1958[1] science fiction horror film starring Robert Clarke and directed, co-written and produced by Ronnie Ashcroft for Hollywood International Productions. The film focuses on a geologist, a gang which has kidnapped a rich heiress, and their encounter with a beautiful but deadly female alien who has crashed to Earth. In the UK, it was released as The Mysterious Invader.[1] The film was released in American theaters on April 10, 1958 by American International Pictures on a double feature with Roger Corman's The Saga of the Viking Women and Their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent.[1]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Astounding_She-Monster

Dracula is a 1931 American pre-Code supernatural horror film directed and co-produced by Tod Browning from a screenplay written by Garrett Fort. It is based on the 1924 stage play Dracula by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston, which in turn is adapted from the 1897 novel Dracula by Bram Stoker.[3] The film stars Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula, a vampire who emigrates from Transylvania to England and preys upon the blood of living victims, including a young man's fiancée.

Produced and distributed by Universal Pictures, Dracula is the first sound film adaptation of the Stoker novel.[4] Several actors were considered to portray the title character, but Lugosi, who had previously played the role on Broadway, eventually got the part. The film was partially shot on sets at Universal Studios Lot in California, which were reused at night for the filming of Drácula, a concurrently produced Spanish-language version of the story also by Universal.

Dracula was a commercial and critical success upon release, and led to several sequels and spin-offs. It has had a notable influence on popular culture, and Lugosi's portrayal of Dracula established the character as a cultural icon, as well as the archetypal vampire in later works of fiction. In 2000, the film was selected by the United States Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry as "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[5] [6]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracula_(1931_English-language_film)

Children of the Corn (advertised as Stephen King's Children of the Corn) is a 1984 American supernatural folk horror film based upon Stephen King’s 1977 short story of the same name. Directed by Fritz Kiersch, the film's cast consists of Peter Horton, Linda Hamilton, John Franklin, Courtney Gains, Robby Kiger, Anne Marie McEvoy, Julie Maddalena, and R. G. Armstrong. Set in the fictitious rural town of Gatlin, Nebraska, the film tells the story of a malevolent entity referred to as "He Who Walks Behind the Rows" which entices the town's children to ritually murder all the town's adults, and a couple driving across the country, to ensure a successful corn harvest.

King wrote the original draft of the screenplay, which focused more on the characters of Burt and Vicky and depicted more history on the uprising of the children in Gatlin. This script was disregarded in favor of George Goldsmith's screenplay, which featured more violence and a more conventional narrative structure. Filming took place mainly in Iowa, but also in California. It spawned a franchise of films, and it has gained a cult following.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children_of_the_Corn_(1984_film)

Search for the Gods is a 1975 television film directed by Jud Taylor, and stars Kurt Russell and Stephen McHattie.[1] It was intended to be the pilot episode of a TV series that never made it into production.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_for_the_Gods

The Incredible Petrified World is a 1960 science fiction film directed by Jerry Warren and starring John Carradine and Robert Clarke. The film is about four explorers who travel down into the depths of the sea and get stranded in an underwater cavern. While waiting to be rescued, the group runs across a crazy old sailor named Matheny who's been living in the cave for years. They find a rotting skeleton of another sailor, whom they learn was murdered by Matheny. The rest of the story deals with their attempts to escape and return to the surface world.

The film was actually completed by Warren in 1957, but remained unreleased until it was distributed in April 1960[3] on a double feature with Warren's Teenage Zombies.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incredible_Petrified_World

King Kong is a 1933 American pre-Code monster adventure film[4] directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack. The screenplay by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose was developed from an idea conceived by Cooper and Edgar Wallace. It stars Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot and Robert Armstrong, and opened in New York City on March 2, 1933, to rave reviews. It has been ranked by Rotten Tomatoes as the fourth greatest horror film of all time[5] and the thirty-third greatest film of all time.[6]

The film portrays the story of a huge, gorilla-like creature dubbed Kong who perishes in an attempt to possess a beautiful young woman (Wray). King Kong contains stop-motion animation by Willis O'Brien and a music score by Max Steiner. In 1991, it was deemed "culturally, historically and aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.[7] A sequel quickly followed with Son of Kong (also released in 1933), with several more films made in the following decades, including two remakes.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Kong_(1933_film)

Target Earth is a 1954 independently made American black-and-white science fiction film, produced by Herman Cohen, directed by Sherman A. Rose, that stars Richard Denning, Kathleen Crowley, Virginia Grey, and Whit Bissell. The film was distributed by Allied Artists Pictures Corporation.

Set in a deserted Chicago, the film's storyline follows a small group of people overlooked during a mass evacuation of "the city that never sleeps", carried out because of a sudden invasion by hostile robotic beings believed to be from the planet Venus.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Target_Earth_(film)

The Angry Red Planet (also called Invasion of Mars and Journey to Planet Four) is a 1959 science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior and starring Gerald Mohr.[1][2]

Melchior reportedly had an initial production budget of only $200,000 and was given just nine days to film it.[3] Such financial and time constraints necessitated the use of "CineMagic," a film-processing technique that combined hand-drawn animations with live-action footage. The relatively inexpensive process was used for all scenes depicting the surface of Mars. While CineMagic proved unsatisfactory for creating visually believable special effects for The Angry Red Planet, producer Norman Maurer did reuse the process in 1962, although to a lesser extent, in the comedy film The Three Stooges in Orbit.[4]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Angry_Red_Planet

The Beast of Hollow Mountain is a 1956 Weird West horror film about an American cowboy living in Mexico who discovers his missing cattle are being preyed upon by dinosaurs.[1] The first film to show dinosaurs and cowboys in the same picture, it is notable for being based on a story idea by special effects innovator Willis O'Brien.[2] O'Brien was also to have originally done the special effects for this movie, but this did not happen for reasons unknown. Jack Rabin, Henry Sharp and Louis de Witt ended up doing the effects, probably based on O'Brien's storyboards. This film was one of the few American/Mexican co-productions of the 50s. It was made in color and filmed in CinemaScope. It starred Guy Madison and Patricia Medina, and was produced/ co-directed by Edward Nassour.[3]

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Beast_of_Hollow_Mountain

The Black Scorpion is a 1957 black-and-white Mexican-American giant arachnid horror film from Warner Bros., produced by Jack Dietz and Frank Melford, directed by Edward Ludwig, and starring Richard Denning, Mara Corday, Carlos Rivas and Mario Navarro.[1]

The film's stop motion animation special effects were created by Willis O'Brien.

For more info click on the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Scorpion_(film)

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Created 1 year, 2 months ago.

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Rea's Creature Features seeks to bring an entertaining plethora of films for your viewing pleasure.

I don't make "MONEY" from these movies.

I'm just a FAN of these films.

More films to come every FRIDAY!

So grab a sixer, pull up a chair, and enjoy these turkeys!

Cheers,
Rea