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"Cradle of Love" is a rock song written by Billy Idol and David Werner for Idol's 1990 fourth studio album Charmed Life. The song is the album's sixth track, and was released as its first single. The song became one of Idol's biggest hits in the United States, where it reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, behind "Vision of Love" by Mariah Carey. It was also Idol's first, and (so far) only No. 1 hit on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart in the U.S. In the UK, it stalled at No. 34.

The video, directed by David Fincher, features footage of Idol singing in large painting frames throughout an apartment. The director made the decision to film Idol from the waist up as he was unable to walk due to injuries from a February 1990 motorcycle crash. The video also features Betsy Lynn George as a teenager who tries to seduce a modest and mild-mannered businessman played by Joshua Townshend-Zellner. The film makes use of clips from The Adventures of Ford Fairlane, but as Andrew Dice Clay (who played Fairlane) had been banned from MTV, he is not shown in any of the clips. The video was a huge hit and was placed in heavy rotation on MTV. Idol and George recreated the opening of the video for the 1991 Grammys. An alternative version of the video does not feature the movie's footage, instead depicting a man playing the guitar as heard in the track.

At the 1990 MTV Video Music Awards, the video was nominated for Best Male Video and Best Special Effects and won the award for Best Video from a Film.

This video was voted #33 on VH1's 50 Sexiest Video Moments.

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"Never Surrender" is a song by Canadian singer Corey Hart. It was released in June 1985 as the first single from his second album, Boy in the Box. The song was number-one for four weeks in Canada and was Hart's highest charting single in the United States, reaching number three on the Billboard Hot 100 (topping the sales only chart for one week) in August 1985.

The song won a Juno Award in 1985 for the "Single of the Year", and was certified Platinum in Canada for sales of over 100,000 copies in 1985.

AllMusic has since called "Never Surrender": "a soaring power ballad of empowerment, giving this album (Boy in the Box) a greater musical and emotional range than his (Hart's) debut." Regarding the song becoming another US hit single Hart said "I really think it's difficult breaking into America regardless of where you're from. I don't think it's any more difficult for a Canadian act than for a band from Oklahoma".

The music video features a story line of Hart leaving his home after an argument with his father and hitchhiking his way to a major city where he finds himself alone and ends with a 'live' performance with his band. Portions of the video were filmed on Yonge Street, Spadina Avenue and Queen Street West in downtown Toronto, including the now defunct Crest Grill. The video's director, Rob Quartly, had worked with Hart on three previous music videos and Quartly was again nominated for a Juno Award for his work on this video.

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"Legs" is a song performed by the band ZZ Top from their 1983 album Eliminator. The song was released as a single in 1984 and reached number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.

Although all three members of ZZ Top are credited with playing on the track, only Gibbons was actually present; engineer Terry Manning was responsible for all the musical parts save the lead guitar. However, David Blayney (ZZ Top stage manager for 15 years) explains in his book Sharp Dressed Men that the pumping synthesizer effect in "Legs" was introduced in pre-production by Linden Hudson. During the final tracking sessions, Terry Manning (final Eliminator tracking engineer) called Linden Hudson and asked how he did the synth effects for "Legs", although Terry could have easily pulled it off if he needed to.

The single remix of "Legs" is much more synthesizer-driven than the album version (although a synthesizer can be heard throughout the latter, it is toned down). There is also a three-note guitar riff heard throughout most of the album version of "Legs", and it is a minute longer than the single version.

The "Legs" video was the third and last of the Eliminator series of videos that introduced the now-iconic 1933 Ford, "Eliminator girls", and ZZ Top-as-benevolent-spirits tropes, all of which have become firmly established aspects of the band's iconography. "Legs" was important in this regard as it diversified the subject of transformation from man ("Gimme All Your Lovin'" and "Sharp Dressed Man") to woman.

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"Danger Zone" is a song, with music composed by Giorgio Moroder and lyrics written by Tom Whitlock, which American singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins recorded and released in 1986. The song was one of the hit singles from the soundtrack to the 1986 American motion picture Top Gun, the best selling soundtrack of 1986 and one of the best selling of all time. According to Allmusic.com, the album "remains a quintessential artifact of the mid-'80s" and the album's hits "still define the bombastic, melodramatic sound that dominated the pop charts of the era."

The music video was released in May 1986 to promote the single. The video was directed by Tony Scott and featured footage of Loggins singing, as well as clips from the film Top Gun, which Scott also directed.

According to the MuchMusic network's program Pop-Up Video, the U.S. Navy described this video as "the most effective recruiting poster ever produced".

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"Love Walks In" is one of the five songs issued as singles from Van Halen's 1986 album 5150.

"The first time Eddie played me that song, late one night, I got goosebumps," recalled singer Sammy Hagar. "It was so beautiful. I wrote the lyrics on the spot and I sang it live with a hand-held mic. If you listen closely, it ain't the best vocal sound in the world, but the performance is slammin'."

The song starts with Eddie Van Halen (lead guitar, keyboards) playing a slow synth, and kicks into the song. The song begins in the key of C and moves into F for the band entrance, then going to the relative D minor for the verses. The pre-chorus jumps to A minor, and in the chorus it goes back to C, keeping a cyclic structure.

It charted at number 4 on the US Billboard Mainstream Rock Songs chart. It also reached number 22 on the Billboard Hot 100.

5150 (pronounced "fifty-one-fifty") is the seventh studio album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released on March 24, 1986 by Warner Bros. Records. It was the first of four albums to be recorded with lead singer Sammy Hagar, who replaced David Lee Roth. The album was named after Eddie Van Halen's home studio, 5150, in turn named after a California law enforcement term for a mentally disturbed person (a reference to Section 5150 of the California Welfare and Institutions Code). The 5150 name has been used several times by Van Halen. The album hit number 1 on the Billboard 200 chart, surpassing the band's previous album, 1984, which had peaked at number 2 behind Michael Jackson's Thriller album, on which Eddie Van Halen made a guest appearance.

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"Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)" is a song performed by Journey, recorded for their album Frontiers and released as a single on January 5, 1983. It peaked at #8 for six consecutive weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and spent four weeks at #1 on the Top Tracks chart.

To accompany the song on MTV, the band shot its first-ever concept video. It was a difficult experience for a variety of reasons, and the resulting clip has been named as one of the worst videos ever.

The song was used in the Disney film Tron: Legacy (2010), the sequel to the 1982 Academy Award-nominated film Tron (which had featured the selection "Only Solutions," an earlier release from the team) and also was used in the Journey arcade game produced by Midway Games--the same company who manufactured both the Tron arcade game and its sequel, Discs of Tron. This song also appears as the mobile phone ringtone of Carl Allen, the main character in the comedy film Yes Man (2008). In addition, an instrumental remixed version without vocals was used as the introductory music to NASCAR on CBS broadcasts (except for the Daytona 500) in the mid-1980s.

The song was written and composed in 1982 during the Escape tour. It is not certain exactly when, or the first time it was performed live. Some sources will claim the 1982 Day on the Green concert, where singer Steve Perry told the crowd, "We just wrote this song about two weeks ago," as the first performance. But bootleg recordings exist of performances at least a month earlier at Chicago's Rosemont Horizon, where Perry also says the song was two weeks old.

There were some minor differences in the lyrics on this live debut compared to the final version found on Frontiers. In a 2008 interview, guitarist Neal Schon recalled the first time it was played live:

It doesn't matter where we put this song because it has always had a strong effect on the audience, all the way back to the first time we played it—before it was even recorded. It was written on tour and we threw it in the set to see how it would go down. The audience had an amazing reaction to it without even knowing what it was.

"Usually we don't write songs that far in advance of an album," observed Jonathan Cain, the band's keyboardist, as Andy Secher, in his article "Adventures in Frontierland," published in the June 1983 issue of Hit Parader Magazine, quoted him. "But on that occasion, Steve [Perry] and I were just working an idea backstage and it all came together. He was working on a bass and I had a guitar, and we just worked out the melody that night and the lyrics the next afternoon. Sometimes you can get lucky and have a song fall together like that."

Schon said that the song was, like many other songs by the band, "Motown mixed with R&B and blues ... that's pretty much where 'Separate Ways' is coming from. It's got a heavier guitar than an R&B song, but I think that's what makes it sound like Journey." Cain said the same thing in 1983:

We wanted to write something rhythmic and still have a strong and haunting melody. We needed a main rhythm to run through the synthesizer and Steve Smith designed that kind of drum beat to let everything breathe. It's really a throwback to all of our roots and the Motown sound. Steve [Perry] has always listened to a lot of Motown records, songs with a strong chorus approach. Songs that were real urgent sounding, but still had rhythm and melody."

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"Mr. Roboto" is a song written by Dennis DeYoung of the band Styx, and recorded on the Styx album Kilroy Was Here. It was also released as a 45 RPM single in a 4:44 single edit, which has the synthesizer intro and a bar at the finale removed (available on Greatest Hits released by PolyTel in Canada in 1992). In Canada, it went to #1 on the RPM national singles chart. In the U.S., it reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song tells part of the story of Robert Orin Charles Kilroy (ROCK), in the rock opera Kilroy Was Here. The song is performed by Kilroy (as played by keyboardist Dennis DeYoung), a rock and roll performer who was placed in a futuristic prison for "rock and roll misfits" by the anti-rock-and-roll group the Majority for Musical Morality (MMM) and its founder Dr. Everett Righteous (played by guitarist James Young). The Roboto is a model of robot which does menial jobs in the prison. Kilroy escapes the prison by overpowering a Roboto prison guard and hiding inside its emptied-out metal shell. When Jonathan Chance (played by guitarist Tommy Shaw) finally meets Kilroy at the very end of the song, Kilroy unmasks and yells "I'm Kilroy! Kilroy!", ending the song.

The robot-like catchphrase was created with a vocoder.

Stan Winston, who would become well-known through his work on Jurassic Park, designed the Roboto costume and mask, which are displayed prominently on the cover of the album Kilroy Was Here. The song's writer Dennis DeYoung did not think of the song as a single until his wife Suzanne, Dennis's friend Dave, and the staff at A&M suggested it as a good candidate. The track was released as the first single from the album at the last minute instead of "Don't Let It End" and turned out to be the band's last Top 5 US hit for eight years. As a result of this song, the Japanese phrase "domou arigatou" entered popular American vernacular. In addition, many have cited this song and the album as potentially having alienated older fans, some calling it "jumping the shark" for the band. Though the song and album may not have resonated with older fans at the time, it remained relevant for younger generations, and James Young has said that due to the song, "we're a part of pop culture."

"Mr. Roboto" has been described as synthpop.

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"That Was Yesterday" is the second single taken from the album Agent Provocateur by the band Foreigner. This song was available in four versions, as a remixed single, an extended remix, an orchestral version, and the original mix. The song was written by Lou Gramm and Mick Jones, and the B-side "Two Different Worlds" is also of note for being the first solo-written Lou Gramm song to appear on a single. The single reached number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also reached #4 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart and #24 on the Adult Contemporary chart. It also reached the Top 40 in the UK (#28), the Netherlands (#19), Switzerland (#29) and Germany (#31).

AllMusic critic Bret Adams later called the song "a terrific hit single," citing its "catchy chorus" and "nifty synthesizer lick."

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"Keep the Fire Burnin" is a song by REO Speedwagon from their 1982 album Good Trouble. This single was the only track from the Good Trouble album to make the top ten on the pop charts, cresting at number seven. It is also the only tune from the album to feature Kevin Cronin on keyboards (piano), which, although primarily the band's lead singer and acoustic/rhythm guitarist, he had begun using (in the studio) on the You Can Tune a Piano, but You Can't Tuna Fish album.

This is the only song from the band's Good Trouble album to have been performed live in its entirety following its supporting tour in 1983. Despite that fact, however, it is still a significant rarity in the band's setlists that has only been performed a handful of times over the last 35 years. As recently as January 2019, Kevin Cronin has played the song during solo acoustic sets during REO concerts. In addition, it is also for unknown reasons the only one of the band's major hit singles that was not included on their compilation album The Hits.

REO Speedwagon (originally stylized as R.E.O. Speedwagon) is an American rock band from Champaign, Illinois. Formed in 1967, the band cultivated a following during the 1970s and achieved significant commercial success throughout the 1980s. The group's best-selling album, Hi Infidelity (1980), contained four US Top 40 hits and sold more than 10 million copies.

Over the course of its career, the band has sold more than 40 million records and has charted 13 Top 40 hits, including the number ones "Keep On Loving You" and "Can't Fight This Feeling". REO Speedwagon's mainstream popularity waned in the late 1980s, but the band remains a popular live act.

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Almost Paradise... Love Theme from Footloose" is the title of a duet by singers Mike Reno of Loverboy and Ann Wilson of Heart. It is one of two major hits with music by singer Eric Carmen and lyrics by Dean Pitchford, the other being Carmen's song "Make Me Lose Control".

Reno is best known as the lead singer of the rock band Loverboy, while Wilson is the lead singer of the rock band Heart. Both bands achieved a significant amount of success in the 1980s, and Reno and Wilson were approached to record a duet for the film Footloose (1984).

Officially listed as the "Love Theme from Footloose" on the film's soundtrack, "Almost Paradise" was one of three top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart found on the soundtrack; it peaked at No. 7 and spent 13 weeks in the top 40. An alternate version of the song with a slightly different musical arrangement, which has never been released, is used in the film. The other hits from this soundtrack include "Footloose" by Kenny Loggins and "Let's Hear It for the Boy" by Deniece Williams, both of which went to No. 1 on the pop chart. "Almost Paradise" was also a hit on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart in the United States, where it spent one week at No. 1. Both singers resumed their respective roles within their bands following this one-off recording.

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"The Wild Boys" is the twelfth single by the English new wave band Duran Duran, released on 26 October 1984 in the United Kingdom and on 3 November 1984 in the United States.

The song was the only studio track on the band's live album Arena (1984), and was produced by Nile Rodgers, who had previously remixed the band's previous single "The Reflex". It was recorded at the end of July 1984 at Maison Rouge Studios in London.

"The Wild Boys" became one of the band's biggest hits, reaching number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks, behind "Out of Touch" by Hall & Oates and "Like a Virgin" by Madonna, and also hitting number one on the US Cash Box. It peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart, and also reached the top position in Germany, Italy, South Africa and Canada. It also became the band's biggest charting single in Australia, reaching number three.

The video for "The Wild Boys" was directed by Russell Mulcahy. The cost totalled over one million pounds, a staggering sum for music videos at the time, as his design filled one entire end of the "007 Stage" at Pinewood Studios with a metal pyramid and a windmill over a deep enclosed pool, and called for a lifelike robotic face, dozens of elaborate costumes, prosthetics, and makeup effects, and then-cutting-edge computer graphics. The choreography of dance routines was undertaken by Arlene Phillips, including intricate stunts and fire effects added to the cost. Mulcahy meant the video to be a teaser for his full-length Burroughs film, demonstrating his vision to the movie studios he was wooing, but that project was never made.

The video featured all of the band members imprisoned and in peril, wearing uncharacteristically rough and ragged outfits similar to the pieced-together clothing of the film Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior. John Taylor was strapped to the roof of a car suffering a psycho-torture with pictures of his childhood and early past; Nick Rhodes was caged with a pile of computer equipment; Roger Taylor was put in a hot-air balloon that was dangling from the ceiling, leaving him high off the ground; Andy Taylor was bound (guitar and all) to a ship's figurehead; and Simon Le Bon was strapped to a blade of the windmill, his head covered in water as the blade passed through the pool.

"The Wild Boys" was named British Video of the Year at the 1985 Brit Awards.

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"When It's Over" was a song written by band members Paul Dean and Mike Reno, released by the rock band Loverboy from their album Get Lucky in 1981. Relying heavily on synthesizers, the song became a Top 40 hit for the band when released as a single the following year, peaking at #26 on the charts for two weeks in June 1982

Loverboy is a Canadian rock band formed in 1979 in Calgary, Alberta. Loverboy's hit singles, particularly "Turn Me Loose" and "Working for the Weekend", have become arena rock staples and are still heard on many classic rock and classic hits radio stations across Canada and the United States. The band is based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

After being rejected by many American record labels, they signed with Columbia/CBS Records Canada and began recording their first album on March 20, 1980. Loverboy's founding members were lead singer Mike Reno, guitarist Paul Dean, keyboardist Doug Johnson, bassist Scott Smith, and drummer Matt Frenette. Throughout the 1980s,
Loverboy accumulated numerous hit songs in Canada and the United States, earning four multi-platinum albums and selling millions of records. Except for a brief breakup from 1988–1991, the band has continued to perform live shows regularly.

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There are some songs that exude the emotions and heartbreak like none other. In 1981 James Ingram released a Quincy Jones song entitled, "Just Once" that brings the heartbreak of a strained relationship to the forefront.

The toughest of individuals cannot speak audibly of this heartbreak but the question is timeless and crosses all barriers, "Just once, can we figure out what we keep doing wrong, why we never last for very long, what are we doing wrong?"

Quincy Jones captures this raw emotion brilliantly in his score and in the lyrical delivery of James Ingram. This song is a timeless classic and Simply 80's is so proud to present it as one of it's most enduring heartbreaking songs of the 80's!

"Just Once" is a 1981 single released from Quincy Jones' album The Dude on A&M Records. The song features James Ingram on vocals, and reached number 17 on the Billboard chart in the summer of 1981.

On a television program interview, Ingram stated that this song was a $50 demo done by ATV Music, composed by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. Quincy Jones called back and wanted Ingram to sing on his album. The song is composed originally in the key of C major. The bridge modulates to the key of A flat major, moves to B major, and finally ends in D major. The song was featured prominently in the 1982 film The Last American Virgin.

James Edward Ingram (February 16, 1952 – January 29, 2019) was an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and instrumentalist. He was a two-time Grammy Award-winner and a two-time Academy Award nominee for Best Original Song. After beginning his career in 1973, Ingram charted eight Top 40 hits on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart from the early 1980s until the early 1990s, as well as thirteen top 40 hits on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. In addition, he charted 20 hits on the Adult Contemporary chart (including two number-ones). He had two number-one singles on the Hot 100: the first, a duet with fellow R&B artist Patti Austin, 1982's "Baby, Come to Me" topped the U.S. pop chart in 1983; "I Don't Have the Heart", which became his second number-one in 1990 was his only number-one as a solo artist.

In between these hits, he also recorded the song "Somewhere Out There" with fellow recording artist Linda Ronstadt for the animated film An American Tail. The song and the music video both became gigantic hits. Ingram co-wrote "The Day I Fall in Love", from the motion picture Beethoven's 2nd (1993), and singer Patty Smyth's "Look What Love Has Done", from the motion picture Junior (1994), which earned him nominations for Best Original Song from the Oscars, Golden Globes, and Grammy Awards in 1994 and 1995.

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"We Built This City" is a 1985 song written by Bernie Taupin, Martin Page, Dennis Lambert and Peter Wolf, and originally recorded by US rock group Starship and released as their debut single on their album Knee Deep in the Hoopla.

Commercially, the single reached number one in Australia, Canada and the United States; the top 10 in Germany, Ireland, Sweden and Switzerland; the top 20 in Belgium, New Zealand and the United Kingdom; and number 21 in Austria and the Netherlands. It has appeared on several "worst song" lists, topping a 2011 Rolling Stone poll of worst songs of the 1980s by a wide margin.

What exists of a narrative in the song consists of an argument between the singers (Mickey Thomas and Grace Slick) and an unidentified "you", presumably a music industry executive, who is marginalizing the band and ripping them off by "playing corporation games" ("who counts the money underneath the bar?"). In response to this injustice, the singers remind the villain of their importance and fame: "Listen to the radio! Don't you remember? We built this city on rock and roll!" A spoken-word interlude explicitly mentions the Golden Gate Bridge and refers to "the city by the bay", a common moniker for Starship's hometown of San Francisco. Starship's predecessors, Jefferson Airplane and Jefferson Starship, were prominent members of San Francisco's psychedelic rock scene in the late 1960s and into the 1970s. However, the interlude then rapidly refers to the same city as "the city that rocks", a reference to Cleveland, Ohio (home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum), and then "the city that never sleeps", one of the nicknames for New York City. Capitalizing on the ambiguity, several radio stations added descriptions of their own local areas when they broadcast the song or added their own ident in its place. The album's title Knee Deep in the Hoopla is taken from a lyric in the first verse of this song.

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"Taken In" is a song performed by Mike + The Mechanics. Written by guitarist Mike Rutherford and producer Christopher Neil, it was the third single released in June 1986 from their 1985 self-titled debut album, and the third to become a Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

As with all the songs on Mike + The Mechanics, "Taken In" began life as a bit of material on a set of demo tapes that Mike Rutherford showed to producer Christopher Neil. According to Rutherford, this particular fragment "has to be the tiniest bit you've ever heard on my tape... If you closed your eyes, you missed it. And Chris [Neil] picked it out, again, and said 'You work on that.'"

"Taken In", like the preceding single "All I Need Is a Miracle", features lead vocals by former Sad Café vocalist Paul Young. It reached number 32 on the Billboard Hot 100 in August 1986; it was the band's last US Top 40 appearance until 1989's "The Living Years".

The lyric "There's one born every minute, and you're looking at him" is a reference to the popular expression "There's a sucker born every minute."

The video for the song opens with Mike Rutherford placing a collect call to a fictional tour manager for the band (played by Roy Kinnear, in a reprise of his role from "All I Need Is a Miracle"). The manager acts suspicious, initially pretending to be absent, and is visibly relieved when Rutherford tells him that due to trouble with the tour van, the band has not yet reached the lodgings that the manager booked for them. After the van is repaired, the band reaches the house and sets up for some rehearsal before bed. The reason behind the manager's odd behavior then becomes apparent: he has accidentally double-booked the house to a family with a half dozen children, who are awakened by the band's performance. The mother is confused and upset by the band's presence, but the father (played by actor/comedian Richard Belzer), seeing that the children are enjoying the music, suggests that they let the band finish the song and then sort things out. Afterwards, Rutherford apologizes to the father and appeals to him to let them stay. He readily agrees since the children all like the band members, and they all spend the next day at the beach. The band then heads back on tour, but the van breaks down again. In an apparent play on the band's name, they try to fix it themselves, but the same family drives by and gives them a lift. As they drive off, all the band's equipment piled up on the car's roof, the father comments that they seem poorly managed and offers to be their new manager.

The role of bassist in the video was played by Paul Young's former bandmate Ashley Mulford. Mulford did not play on any of Mike + The Mechanics's actual sound recordings, but was part of their real life touring band for a time.

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"Sister Christian" is a power ballad by the American hard rock band Night Ranger. It was released in March 1984 as the second single from their album Midnight Madness. It was ranked number 32 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of the 1980s. It was written and sung by the band's drummer, Kelly Keagy, for his sister. It was the band's biggest hit, peaking at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, and staying on the charts for 24 weeks. It also reached number one in Canada.

The song is about Keagy's little sister, Christy. Keagy wrote the song at his apartment, near Divisadero and California streets in San Francisco, after he had just returned from a visit to his hometown of Eugene, Oregon. He had been struck at how fast his teenaged sister, 10 years younger than he was, was growing up.

"After we started playing it a lot, Jack turned to me and said, 'What exactly are you saying?'" Keagy recalled. "He thought the words were Sister Christian, instead of Sister Christy, so it just stuck."

The lyric, "You're motoring. What's your price for flight? In finding Mr. Right?" is the subject of much debate. The band stated in a VH-1 Behind the Music interview that the term "motoring" was synonymous with the term "cruising."

Night Ranger is an American rock band from San Francisco formed in 1979 that gained popularity during the 1980s with a series of albums and singles. The band's first five albums sold more than 10 million copies worldwide and have sold 17 million albums total. The quintet is best known for the power ballad "Sister Christian", which peaked at No. 5 in June 1984.

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"Xanadu" is the title song from the soundtrack to the 1980 film Xanadu. The song is performed by English-born Australian singer Olivia Newton-John and English rock band Electric Light Orchestra (ELO). Newton-John sings the primary vocals, with ELO lead singer and the song's writer Jeff Lynne adding "parenthetic" vocals in the style of their other songs on the Xanadu soundtrack, along with ELO providing the instrumentation. It is Lynne's favorite song of all that he has written.

"Xanadu" reached number one in several countries and was the band's only UK number-one single, when it peaked there for two weeks in July 1980. It was certified Silver by the British Phonographic Industry. It also peaked at number eight on the US Billboard Hot 100.

Xanadu is a 1980 American musical fantasy film written by Richard Christian Danus and Marc Reid Rubel, and directed by Robert Greenwald. The film stars Olivia Newton-John, Gene Kelly (in his final film role), and Michael Beck, and features music by Newton-John, Electric Light Orchestra, Cliff Richard, and The Tubes.

The title is a reference to the nightclub in the film, which takes its name from Xanadu, the summer capital of Kublai Khan's Yuan Dynasty in China. This city appears in Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a poem that is quoted in the film.

A box office disappointment, Xanadu earned negative critical reviews and was an inspiration for the creation of the Golden Raspberry Awards to recognize the worst films of the year. Despite the lackluster performance of the film, the soundtrack album became a huge commercial success around the world, and was certified double platinum in the United States. The song "Magic" was a U.S. number one hit for Newton-John, and the title track (by Newton-John and Electric Light Orchestra) reached number one in the United Kingdom and several other countries around the world. The film has since become a cult classic for the way it mixes the storyline from an old-fashioned 1940s fantasy with modern aesthetics featuring late 1970s and early 1980s rock and pop music on the soundtrack as well as for fans of Newton-John.

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"The Power of Love" is a 1985 single by Huey Lewis and the News, written for and featured in the 1985 blockbuster film Back to the Future. It gave the band their first number-one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and their second number-one hit on the U.S. Top Rock Tracks chart; and as a Double-A side, it was a top ten hit on the Official UK Singles Chart, where it appeared on UK editions of the band's fourth studio album, Fore!.

The song appears early in Back to the Future as Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) skateboards to school. Later in the film, McFly and his band play a hard rock version of the song for a Battle of the Bands audition (at which a character played by Huey Lewis himself is judging and tells Marty's group that they are "just too darn loud") and later when Marty returns to his neighborhood. In the sequel, Back to the Future Part II, the 2015 version of Marty attempts to play the song on his guitar just after being fired but ends up playing it very poorly due to his damaged hand from his 1985 accident with a Rolls-Royce. Finally, it can be briefly heard playing in the car where Needles and his buddies are driving when Needles challenges Marty to the fate-determining car race near the end of Back to the Future Part III.

The music video, filmed in June 1985, shows the band playing in a nightclub (Uncle Charlie's, a frequent stop for the band in their early career) with Dr. Emmett Brown (Christopher Lloyd) showing up in his DeLorean, apparently after time-traveling, and a couple stealing it for a joy ride. Lewis said filming took the entire day and night to complete, with the band finishing up at 3:00 AM.

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Simply 80's pays tribute to the man that starting it all. Hank Williams Sr. is the grandfather of Rock n' Roll. No song exemplifies this more than "Hey Good Lookin'."

"Hey, Good Lookin'" is a 1951 song written and recorded by Hank Williams, and his version was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2001. Since its original 1951 recording it has been covered by a variety of artists.

There are literally very few musicians that have influenced Rock N' Roll more than Hank Williams Sr. In his short 29 years Hank was instrumental in changing the direction of music thus he is one of a very few to be inducted into the Rock N' Roll, Country Music , Gospel and Grand Ole' Opry Halls of Fame. Before there was Elvis Presley, Bill Haley and The Comets and others there was Hank!

He influenced Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bob Dylan, George Jones, Charley Pride, and The Rolling Stones, among others. Williams was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame (1961), the Songwriters Hall of Fame (1970), and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1987). The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2010 awarded him a posthumous special citation "for his craftsmanship as a songwriter who expressed universal feelings with poignant simplicity and played a pivotal role in transforming country music into a major musical and cultural force in American life."

Hiram "Hank" Williams (September 17, 1923 – January 1, 1953) was an American singer-songwriter and musician. Regarded as one of the most significant and influential American singers and songwriters of the 20th century, Williams recorded 35 singles (five released posthumously) that reached the Top 10 of the Billboard Country & Western Best Sellers chart, including 11 that ranked number one (three posthumously).

There are several versions of how Williams got his first guitar. His mother stated that she bought it with money from selling peanuts, but many other prominent residents of the town claimed to have been the one who purchased the guitar for him. While living in Georgiana, Williams met Rufus "Tee-Tot" Payne, a black street performer. Payne gave Williams guitar lessons in exchange for meals prepared by Lillie Williams or money. Payne's base musical style was blues.

He taught Williams chords, chord progressions, bass turns, and the musical style of accompaniment that he would use in most of his future songwriting. Later on, Williams recorded one of the songs that Payne taught him, "My Bucket's Got a Hole in It". Williams' musical style contained influences from Payne along with several other country influences, among them "the Singing Brakeman" Jimmie Rodgers, Moon Mullican, and Roy Acuff. In 1937, Williams got into a physical altercation with his physical education coach about exercises the coach wanted him to do. His mother subsequently demanded that the school board terminate the coach; when they refused, the family moved to Montgomery, Alabama. Payne and Williams lost touch, though eventually, Payne also moved to Montgomery, where he died in poverty in 1939. Williams later credited him as his only teacher.

Simply 80's pays tribute to this great singer, songwriter, musical pioneer and the man known as the "Hillbilly Shakespeare".

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"My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)" is a song that was performed by the Canadian group Chilliwack. It was released on their 1981 album Wanna Be a Star.

In Canada, the song spent four weeks at number 3. In the United States, it reached number 22 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In their native Canada, writers Brian MacLeod and Bill Henderson were nominated for the Juno Award for 1982 Composer of the Year. Also, "My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)" was nominated for the Juno Award for 1982 Single of the Year.

Chilliwack is a Canadian rock band centered on the singer and guitarist Bill Henderson, which started off with a more progressive rock sound that incorporated elements of folk, jazz and blues, before moving towards a more straight-ahead hard rock/pop rock sound by the mid-70s. They were active from 1970 to 1988. Henderson reformed the band in 1997. Their six best-selling songs were "My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)", "I Believe", "Whatcha Gonna Do", "Fly at Night", "Crazy Talk", and "Lonesome Mary". The band's lineup has changed many times while they have continued to tour across Canada.

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In the early 80's there was no band hotter than Air Supply. This band from Australia catapulted onto the music scene in 1980 and had their first 5 hits land in the top 5 on Billboard's Hot 100. The only other band to do that was The Beatles.

In 1981 the hits kept coming as Air Supply released the album "The One That You Love" and with it the title song which hit #1 on Billboard's Hot 100. According to Graham Russell the song was written in just 30 minutes and features one of the best singers in music history, Russell Hitchcock.

The duo from "down under" have a huge world wide following and have sold over 100 million records. Their impact on the industry shows with multiple Top 10 hits, a world wide fan base and many of its songs being featured in mega movie hits!

Simply 80's is again proud to present it's favorite 80's band and their hit song from 1981 "The One That You Love."

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During the 80's music was changing and hits were coming from all directions. There was the 2nd British invasion but less known was the Australian invasion. Groups like Air Supply, AC/DC were staples on Billboard's Hot 100. Among them was another band from Australia, Crowded House.

Crowded House is a rock band, formed in Melbourne, Australia, in 1985. Its founding members were New Zealander Neil Finn (vocalist, guitarist, primary songwriter) and Australians Paul Hester (drums) and Nick Seymour (bass). Later band members included Neil Finn's brother, Tim Finn, and Americans Mark Hart and Matt Sherrod. Neil Finn and Seymour have been the sole constant members of the group since its formation.

In April 1987 the band released the hit single, "Something So Strong." The song peaked at #7 on Billboard's Hot 100.

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Big Country are a Scottish rock band formed in Dunfermline, Fife, in 1981.

The height of the band's popularity was in the early to mid 1980s, although it retained a cult following for many years after. The band's music incorporated Scottish folk and martial music styles, and the band engineered their guitar-driven sound to evoke the sound of bagpipes, fiddles and other traditional folk instruments.

"In a Big Country" was released in May 1983 as the third single from their debut studio album The Crossing. The song reached No. 17 on the UK Singles Chart in June 1983. It was released in the US in the fall of 1983 and peaked at No. 3 on the Top Rock Tracks chart and No. 17 on the Billboard Hot 100 in December of that year. It reached No. 3 on the RPM Top Singles Chart in Canada on 26 November 1983.

The music video for the song received heavy airplay on MTV. It follows the four band members as they track down an unspecified treasure, while constantly being pursued and bested by a woman who appears to be a rival treasure-hunter.

The first half of the video follows the band as they ride through lush green fields on sports three-wheelers and a motorbike while the woman watches them through binoculars. The group soon locates a black box emblazoned with the band's logo and a map. What is inside the box is never shown. The opening scenes are filmed at the then-derelict Corfe Castle railway station including the 'down' platform shelter and show the ruins of Corfe Castle in the background. The station is now part of the restored Swanage Railway.

The woman lures them to her by starting a fire in a barn, the smoke drawing the band members' attention. She (unintentionally and comically) defeats all four with a single punch. They then consult their map and head off again.

The second half of the video takes place at sea in Swanage Bay. The band head towards Swanage Pier where they don wet suits and scuba gear and set out on a motorized inflatable raft. The woman, who has followed them, overtakes them on a jet ski. The band reach their destination at sea, but have apparently no luck in locating the treasure after attempting some underwater diving (however, since nobody in the band was actually scuba certified, this meant having to stay on the surface).

The video concludes with the woman trapped on a small island surrounded by a cliff with a rescue fire burning. The band appears overhead and lead singer Stuart Adamson tosses a rope down the cliff edge. He and drummer Mark descend. Stuart and the woman embrace (perhaps revealing they knew each other and had an ongoing relationship/rivalry) while Mark discovers the black box floating amongst the seaweed in the inlet.

Interspersed throughout the video, in between the action, the band is shown in flannel shirts and blazers performing the song onstage. The video ends on this note, with Stuart dancing and the rest of the band playing.

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"Take Me Home Tonight" is a song by American rock singer Eddie Money. It was released in August 1986 as the lead single from his album Can't Hold Back. The song's chorus interpolates the Ronettes' 1963 hit "Be My Baby", with original vocalist Ronnie Spector reprising her role.

The song reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 15, 1986, and number one on the Album Rock Tracks chart; outside the U.S., it was a top 15 hit in Canada. It received a Grammy nomination for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance, and was Money's biggest hit on the U.S. charts.

Alongside its album, "Take Me Home Tonight" helped revive Money's career after a period of declining sales. It also allowed Spector to resume her touring/recording career after several years of retirement.

The video was directed by Nick Morris and shot entirely in black and white at the Lawlor Events Center in Reno, Nevada. It opens with Money alone with a metal ladder and a folding chair on an otherwise empty stage. He sings and plays an alto saxophone to an absent audience, while Ronnie Spector is seen in a make-up room and then walking through a backstage hallway to the arena floor during cutaways. Spector's face is not completely revealed until about three-quarters of the way through the video, when she joins Money on the stage.

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"Key Largo" is a popular song recorded by Bertie Higgins in 1981. Released as a single in September 1981, the song became Higgins' only Top 40 hit in the United States in early 1982, when it peaked at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song spent 17 weeks in the Top 40 and was certified Gold by the RIAA. In addition, "Key Largo" topped the adult contemporary chart for two weeks. In the United Kingdom, the song reached #60 on the UK Singles Chart.

The song's lyrics plead with a lover to reconsider ending a romance the singer compares to that depicted by the stars of the 1948 film Key Largo, Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. The glamorous couple is recalled in the lyric We had it all / Just like Bogie and Bacall / Starring in our own late late show / Sailin' away to Key Largo. The lyrics also draw from the film Casablanca, in the lines "Here's looking at you, kid" and "Please say you will / Play it again". The song "Key Largo" was included on Higgins' album Just Another Day in Paradise.

In 2009, VH1 ranked "Key Largo" #75 on its program 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s.

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Welcome to Simply 80's, a channel dedicated to the music videos from the greatest decade in Pop/Rock music. Take a look around at a collection(growing daily) that spans numerous genres and take the time to really appreciate what this amazing decade gave us! Background information provided courtesy of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia as well as the administrator.

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