The Grand Bogan

In 2016 it was revealed that wealthy Chinese businessmen linked to the Chinese Communist Party had become the largest donors to both major political parties.

From politics to culture, real estate to agriculture, universities to unions, and even in our primary schools, there's compelling evidence of the Chinese Communist Party’s infiltration of Australia. Sophisticated influence operations target Australia’s elites, and parts of the large Chinese-Australian diaspora have been mobilised to buy access to politicians, limit academic freedom, intimidate critics, collect information for Chinese intelligence agencies, and protest in the streets against Australian government policy. It’s no exaggeration to say the Chinese Communist Party and Australian democracy are on a collision course.

The CCP is determined to win, while Australia looks the other way.

Lyrics:

Australia used to be the lucky country
But our pollies now are cutting up the pie
They're bending over forwards with a jar of vaseline
Selling off our future, and that's why

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They copy everything they see
They don't pay you no royalties, they're really just thieves

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They welcome you into their shacks
While you're not looking there's a knife in your back

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They're infiltrating our economy
They'll spin you some bullshit, then do as they please

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They're printing money everyday
When the bubble is crashed, there'll be all hell to pay

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They're buying everything they can
From power to ports, all of our farming lands

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
There's thirteen hundred million of them breeding now
It's no wonder that they're taking over all of our cows

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
They really are a bunch of creeps
They manipulate markets then buy on the cheap

Now this bits about them, talking about having to come into Australia
They're gonna bring in the 457 visa holders
Give 'em a bag of rice a day, take all our Aussie jobs
What it's called is...Bend over and Take it fella!

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
Their food will give you a disease
You can get Salmonella, that's in Cantonese

No More Chinese, No More Chinese
Take your trade deals and shove 'em up your bum
Keep your millions of workers back where they belong

No More Chinese, No More Chinese

"I Vow to Thee, My Country" is a British patriotic hymn, created in 1921, when a poem by Sir Cecil Spring Rice was set to music by Gustav Holst.

This patriotic hymn has been played by those within the Commonwealth. The ANZAC's played this as part of their patriotic tunes as they sailed from Australia to Egypt and as a recruiting song for those at home.

Lyrics:

I vow to thee, my country, all earthly things above
Entire and whole and perfect, the service of my love;
The love that asks no question, the love that stands the test
That lays upon the altar the dearest and the best;
The love that never falters, the love that pays the price
The love that makes undaunted the final sacrifice

And there's another country, I've heard of long ago
Most dear to them that love her, most great to them that know;
We may not count her armies, we may not see her King;
Her fortress is a faithful heart, her pride is suffering;
And soul by soul and silently her shining bounds increase
And her ways are ways of gentleness, and all her paths are peace

The Sydney railway gallop, composed by Frederick Ellard, 1824-1874

An Australian sea ballad arranged by Robert Sheldon, 2007, based on the folk song "Catalpa"

A patriotic poem from the famous Australian poet A.B Banjo Paterson. Instruments played and sung by Wallis and Matilda.

Lyrics:

They came of bold and roving stock that would not fixed abide;
They were the sons of field and flock since e'er they learnt to ride,
We may not hope to see such men in these degenerate years
As those explorers of the bush -- the brave old pioneers.

'Twas they who rode the trackless bush in heat and storm and drought;
'Twas they who heard the master-word that called them farther out;
'Twas they who followed up the trail the mountain cattle made,
And pressed across the mighty range where now their bones are laid.

But now the times are dull and slow, the brave old days are dead
When hardy bushmen started out, and forced their way ahead
By tangled scrub and forests grim towards the unknown west,
And spied the far-off promised land from off the range's crest.

Oh! ye that sleep in lonely graves by far-off ridge and plain,
We drink to you in silence now as Christmas comes again,
To you who fought the wilderness through rough unsettled years --
The founders of our nation's life, the brave old pioneers.

"(Bound for) Botany Bay" is a transportation song from the musical burlesque, "Little Jack Sheppard", first performed on the London stage in 1885 and in Melbourne, Australia, in 1886. It is now widely considered a traditional Australian folk song.

Lyrics:

Farewell to old England for ever,
Farewell to my old pals as well,
Farewell to the well-known Old Bailey
Where I used for to look such a swell.

[Chorus]
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, ay,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
And we're bound for Botany Bay.

There's the captain as is our commander,
There's the bo'sun and all the ship's crew,
There's the first and the second-class passengers,
Knows what we poor convicts go through.

[Chorus]
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, ay,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
And we're bound for Botany Bay.

'Taint leaving old England we cares about,
'Taint cos we mis-spells what we knows,
But because all we light-fingered gentry
Hops around with a log on our toes.

[Chorus]
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, ay,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
And we're bound for Botany Bay.

Oh, had I the wings of a turtle-dove,
I'd soar on my pinions so high,
Straight back to the arms of my Polly love,
And in her sweet presence I'd die.

[Chorus]
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, ay,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
And we're bound for Botany Bay.

Now all my young Dookies and Duchesses,
Take warning from what I've to say:
Mind all is your own as you toucheses
Or you'll find us in Botany Bay.

[Chorus]x2
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, ay,
Singing too-ral-li, oo-ral-li, addity,
And we're bound for Botany Bay.

Song of the Federation (1901), a poem made by the patriotic and famous poet, Andrew Barton "Banjo" Paterson. Sung and instruments played by Wallis and Matilda.

Lyrics:

As the nations sat together, grimly waiting,
The fierce and ancient nations battle-scarred,
Grown grey in their lusting and their hating,
Ever armed and ever ready keeping guard,
Through the tumult of their warlike preparation
And the half-stilled clamour of the drums
Came a voice crying, 'Lo, a new-made Nation,
To her place in the sisterhood she comes!'

And she came. She was beautiful as morning,
With the bloom of the roses on her mouth,
Like a young queen lavishly adorning
Her charms with the splendours of the South.
And the fierce old nations, looking on her,
Said, 'Nay, surely she were quickly overthrown;
Hath she strength for the burden laid upon her,
Hath she power to protect and guard her own?'

Then she spoke, and her voice was clear and ringing
In the ears of the nations old and grey,
Saying, 'Hark, and ye shall hear my children singing
Their war-song in countries far away.
They are strangers to the tumult of the battle,
They are few, but their hearts are very strong,
'Twas but yesterday they called unto the cattle,
But they now sing Australia's marching song.'

For the honour of Australia, our Mother,
Side by side with our kin from over sea,
We have fought and we have tested one another,
And enrolled among the brotherhood are we.

There was never post of danger but we sought it
In the fighting through the fire, and through the flood
There was never prize so costly but we bought it,
Though we paid for its purchase with our blood.

Was there any road too rough for us to travel?
Was there any path too far for us to tread?
You can track us by the blood drops on the gravel
On the roads that we milestoned with our dead!

And for you. O our young and anxious mother,
O'er your great gains keeping watch and ward,
Neither fearing nor despising any other,
We will hold your possessions with the sword.

Then they passed to the place of world-long sleeping,
The grey-clad figures with their dead,
To the sound of their women softly weeping
And the Dead March moaning at their head:

And the Nations, as the grim procession ended,
Whispered, 'Child, thou has seen the price we pay;
From War may we ever be defended,
Kneel thee down, new-made Sister, Let us Pray!'

“Ten Thousand Miles Away” – a tongue-in-cheek satire about the grim reality of the hell of convict transportation to Australia that started in 1788 and lasted until the 1840’s. Note the use of the convict slang for handcuffs and leg-irons –government chains! The teller of this tale is heartbroken to see his true-love Meg, sail away “she’s taking a trip on a government ship, ten thousand miles away”

Sung and instruments used by Stringybark Band

Lyrics:

Sing Ho! for a brave and a valiant ship, And a fair and braven breeze,
A bonny crew and a Captain too, to carry me over the seas,
To carry me over the seas, me boys, To my true love far away,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

[Chorus]
So blow the winds, Heigh-ho; A roving I will go,
I'll stay no more on Ireland's shore, To hear the music play,
I'm off by the morning train, To catch the raging main,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

My true love, she was beautiful, My true love she was young;
Her eyes are like the diamonds bright, and silvery was her tongue
And silvery was her tongue, me boys, But lo she's a far away,
She's taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

[Chorus]
So blow the winds, Heigh-ho; A roving I will go,
I'll stay no more on Ireland's shore, To hear the music play,
I'm off by the morning train, To catch the raging main,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

Dark and dismal was the day When last I see me mich
She had a government band around each arm, and another around her leg,
And another around her leg, me boys, As the big ship left the bay
"Adieu" says she, "remember me, Ten thousand miles away."

[Chorus]
So blow the winds, Heigh-ho; A roving I will go,
I'll stay no more on Ireland's shore, To hear the music play,
I'm off by the morning train, To catch the raging main,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

I wish I were a bo' s'n bold, Or only a bombadier,
I'd build a boat and away I float, and straight to my true love steer =
And straight to my true love steer, me boys, Where the dancing dolphins play,
And the whales and the sharks are having their larks, Ten thousand miles away.

[Chorus]
So blow the winds, Heigh-ho; A roving I will go,
I'll stay no more on Ireland's shore, To hear the music play,
I'm off by the morning train, To catch the raging main,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

The sun may shine through a London fog, Or the river quite clear,
The oceans' brine be turned to wine, Or I may forget me beer -
Or I may forget me beer, me boys, On the landlord's quarter-day;
Before I'll forget my own sweetheart, Ten thousand miles away!

[Chorus]x2
So blow the winds, Heigh-ho; A roving I will go,
I'll stay no more on Ireland's shore, To hear the music play,
I'm off by the morning train, To catch the raging main,
I'm taken a trip on a government ship Ten thousand miles away.

"My Country" by Dorothea Mackellar, set to music in 1982 by Jackie Trent and Tony Hatch. Source of audio unknown.

"My Country" is an iconic patriotic poem about Australia, written by Dorothea Mackellar (1885–1968) at the age of 19 while homesick in the United Kingdom. After travelling through Europe extensively with her father during her teenage years, she started writing the poem in London in 1904 and re-wrote it several times before her return to Sydney. The poem was first published in The Spectator in London on 5 September 1908 under the title "Core of My Heart". It was reprinted in many Australian newspapers, quickly becoming well known and establishing Mackellar as a poet.

Lyrics:

I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror,
The wide brown land for me,
Australia for me.

Core of my heart, my country!
Land of the Rainbow Gold,
For fire and flood and famine,
She pays us back threefold -
But then the grey clouds gather,
And we can bless again,
The drumming of an army,
The steady, soaking rain.

[Chorus]
I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror,
The wide brown land for me,
Australia for me.

An opal-hearted country,
A wilful, lavish land -
All you who have not loved her,
You will not understand -
Though earth holds many splendours,
Wherever I may die,
I know what brown country,
My homing thoughts will fly.

[Chorus]
I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror,
The wide brown land for me,
Australia for me.

Australia for me,
Australia for me,
Australia, for me!

A cheeky and funny poem by the patriotic poet, A.B Banjo Paterson. Sung and Instruments played by Wallis & Matilda.

The Barcoo Shire is a remote rural shire located in western Queensland in the heart of the channel country. Encompassing the towns of Jundah, Windorah and Stonehenge with a total shire population of approximately 460.
The Shire’s primary river systems are the Thomson and Barcoo, which amalgamate above Windorah to become Cooper’s Creek. All rivers and creeks within the Shire merge and flow southwest towards South Australia, terminating at Lake Eyre.
Covering a region of 60901sq km, the Barcoo Shire adjoins the North-East, South Australian border and is bordered by the shires of Diamantina, Longreach, Winton, Isisford, Quilpie and Bulloo. The country displays extremes of dry red expanses to flooding plains with masses of wildflowers.
The Shire's predominant industry is beef production with opal mining, tourism and hospitality to a lesser extent. Due to drought and economics wool production has declined considerably. The discovery of oil and gas reserves within the shire has seen substantial development in this industry.

Approximately 90km from Jundah towards Yaraka is the historic site of the shanty immortalised in Banjo Patterson's poem "A Bush Christening", not far from the ruins of the Cobb & Co pub and the lonely grave of goldminer Richard Magoffin who perished in 1885

Lyrics:

On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
One Michael Magee had a shanty.
Now this Mike was the dad of a ten year old lad,
Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
For the youngster had never been christened.

And his wife used to cry, `If the darlin' should die
Saint Peter would not recognise him.'
But by luck he survived till a preacher arrived,
Who agreed straightaway to baptise him.

Now the artful young rogue, while they held their collogue,
With his ear to the keyhole was listenin',
And he muttered in fright, while his features turned white,
`What the divil and all is this christenin'?'

He was none of your dolts, he had seen them brand colts,
And it seemed to his small understanding,
If the man in the frock made him one of the flock,
It must mean something very like branding.

So away with a rush he set off for the bush,
While the tears in his eyelids they glistened —
`'Tis outrageous,' says he, `to brand youngsters like me,
I'll be dashed if I'll stop to be christened!'

Like a young native dog he ran into a log,
And his father with language uncivil,
Never heeding the `praste' cried aloud in his haste,
`Come out and be christened, you divil!'

But he lay there as snug as a bug in a rug,
And his parents in vain might reprove him,
Till his reverence spoke (he was fond of a joke)
`I've a notion,' says he, `that'll move him.'

`Poke a stick up the log, give the spalpeen a prog;
Poke him aisy — don't hurt him or maim him,
'Tis not long that he'll stand, I've the water at hand,
As he rushes out this end I'll name him.

`Here he comes, and for shame! ye've forgotten the name —
Is it Patsy or Michael or Dinnis?'
Here the youngster ran out, and the priest gave a shout —
`Take your chance, anyhow, wid `Maginnis'!'

As the howling young cub ran away to the scrub
Where he knew that pursuit would be risky,
The priest, as he fled, flung a flask at his head
That was labelled `MAGINNIS'S WHISKY'!

And Maginnis Magee has been made a J.P.,
And the one thing he hates more than sin is
To be asked by the folk, who have heard of the joke,
How he came to be christened `Maginnis'!

"Abide with Me" is a hymn written by Scottish Anglican Henry Francis Lyte.

The hymn is sung at the annual Anzac Day services in Australia and New Zealand, and in some Remembrance Day services in Canada and the United Kingdom.

Performed by the Royal Australian Navy Band.

Lyrics:

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;
the darkness deepens; Lord, with me abide.
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day;
earth's joys grow dim; its glories pass away;
change and decay in all around I see;
O thou who changest not, abide with me.

I need thy presence every passing hour.
What but thy grace can foil the tempter's power?
Who, like thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with thee at hand to bless;
ills have no weight, and tears not bitterness.
Where is death's sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if thou abide with me.

Hold thou thy cross before my closing eyes;
shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.
Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee;
in life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

The Royal Standard March performed by the Royal Australian Navy Band

Australia Will Be There or Auld Lang Syne. Australia Will Be There is an Australian patriotic song written in 1915 as Australian troops were sent abroad to fight the German and Ottoman forces in Europe and the Middle East. Often regarding as Australia's loyal willingness to aid Britain during the Great War. The song was composed by Walter William Francis.

Lyrics:

There are lots and lots of arguments
Going on today
As to whether dear old England
Should be brought into the fray
But all right thinking people
Know well we had to fight
For the Kaiser’s funny business
It wants some putting right.
Rally 'round the banner of your country
Take the field with brothers o'er the foam
On land or sea
Wherever you be
Keep your eye on Germany
But England, home and beauty
Have no cause to fear
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
No, no, no, no, no!
Australia will be there
Australia will be there
You have heard about the Emden ship
Cruising all around
She was sinking British merchant men
Where'er they could be found
But one fine morning early
The Sydney hove in sight
She trained her guns upon them
And the German said ‘goodnight’
Rally 'round the banner of your country
Take the field with brothers o'er the foam
On land or sea
Wherever you be
Keep your eye on Germany
But England, home and beauty
Have no cause to fear
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
No, no, no, no, no!
Australia will be there
Australia will be there

White Australia (also called White Australia March, National Policy Song, & March of the Great White Policy)

Composed by W. E. Naunton
Words by the Composer and H. Gyles

Lyrics:

White Australia bold and free, our National policy,
We mean to face the conquest as a Nation:
Our Northern Territory, no longer is to be
The open gate of coloured immigration.
This continent of ours is now a white man's land,
And not for alien surplus population:
Britain's sons shall now maintain, and Anglo-Saxon's reign
To rule and guide Australia's destination.
Our policy will ever be -

[Chorus]
Australia! Australia!
Sunny South of old Britannia's sons
Australia, the "white man's land,"
Defended by the white man's guns.
Australia! Australia!!
For Anglo-Saxon race and "Southern Cross"
God bless and help us to protect
Our glorious land Australia

We have nestled in the fold, of a navy brave and bold,
That has ruled and reigned supreme, quite unmolested;
A navy we must own, so that we can hold our own,
Should her right to rule the seas be e'er contested
Ten thousand miles away, the British navy lay,
Just far enough to mean a sure surrender
Unless this sunny land can enter hand in hand,
With power combined to fight for White Australia.
Our policy will ever be -

[Chorus]
Australia! Australia!
Sunny South of old Britannia's sons
Australia, the "white man's land,"
Defended by the white man's guns.
Australia! Australia!!
For Anglo-Saxon race and "Southern Cross"
God bless and help us to protect
Our glorious land Australia

It is plain for all to see, that the future is to be
A struggle to defend Australia home and beauty
The conflict has begun, and each and every one
Must face the fact that he must do his duty,
Let us train our Austral sons, to stand behind our guns,
One flag, one tongue, one people's destination.
The question one and all, must be the bugle call
To strike with all our might for White Australia.
Our policy will ever be -

[Chorus]
Australia! Australia!
Sunny South of old Britannia's sons
Australia, the "white man's land,"
Defended by the white man's guns.
Australia! Australia!!
For Anglo-Saxon race and "Southern Cross"
God bless and help us to protect
Our glorious land Australia

Australian Army Band Corps Medley, played in 2011 at Basel, Switzerland.

Basel Tattoo, is an annual military tattoo show performed by International military bands, display teams, popular musicians, and tattoo formations.

Roll Up! is a WWI recruiting song written and composed by Crad Evans and was published in the 1910s, Melbourne, Victoria.

Sung by Mark Nivet and Performed by the Royal Australian Navy.

Gallipoli Quick March

"Waltzing Matilda" is Australia's most widely known bush ballad.

The title is Australian slang for travelling by foot with one's goods (waltzing, derived from the German auf der Walz) in a "Matilda" (bag) slung over one's back. The song narrates the story of an itinerant worker, or "swagman", making a drink of tea at a bush camp and capturing a sheep to eat. When the sheep's owner arrives with three police officers to arrest the worker for the theft, the worker commits suicide by drowning himself in the nearby watering hole, after which his ghost haunts the site.

The original lyrics were written in 1895 by poet and nationalist Banjo Paterson. It was first published as sheet music in 1903. Extensive folklore surrounds the song and the process of its creation, to the extent that the song has its own museum, the Waltzing Matilda Centre in Winton, Queensland. In 2012, to remind Australians of the song's significance, Winton organised the inaugural Waltzing Matilda Day to be held on 6 April, the anniversary of its first performance.

The song was first recorded in 1926 as performed by John Collinson and Russell Callow. In 2008, this recording of "Waltzing Matilda" was added to the "Sounds of Australia Registry" in the National Film and Sound Archive which says that there are more recordings of "Waltzing Matilda" than any other Australian song.

This recording is from André Rieu

Lyrics:

Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong
Under the shade of a coolibah tree,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his "Billy" boiled
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

[Chorus]
Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his "Billy" boiled,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Down came a jumbuck to drink at that billabong,
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee,
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

[Chorus]
Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his "Billy" boiled,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Up rode the squatter, mounted on his thoroughbred.
Down came the troopers, one, two, and three.
"Whose is that jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag?
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

[Chorus]
Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his "Billy" boiled,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Up jumped the swagman and sprang into the billabong.
"You'll never catch me alive!" said he
And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

[Chorus]
Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his "Billy" boiled,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

The 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment (Queensland Mounted Infantry) is a regiment of the Australian Army and forms part of the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. The regiment, as the last remaining Australian Light Horse unit, has been widely romanticised and popularised in literature and poetry throughout the 20th Century. The unit sentimentally traces its lineage to 1860 and is the oldest Australian Regular Army unit through antecedent units the 2nd Moreton Light Horse (QMI) and the 14th West Moreton Light Horse (QMI). The regiment is assigned to 7th Brigade based in Brisbane and is equipped with the M1A1 Abrams tank and the ASLAV reconnaissance vehicle.

Their quick march is, "Soldiers of the Queen".
Performed by The Band of the Royal Corps of Signals.

Quick march of the 8th/9th Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment - The Brown and Grey Lanyard

Quick March of the 7th Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment; Cock o' the North

Quick march of the 6th Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment; The Spirit of Youth

Quick march of the 1st Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment; Waltzing Matilda

Quick march of the 5th Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment; Dominique

Quick march of the 3rd Battalion the Royal Australian Regiment; Our Director

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Created 5 months, 4 weeks ago.

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CategoryMusic

G'Day viewers,

This channel is solely dedicated to historic Australian Marches, Folk Songs, Rare Songs, Waltzes and more. The purpose of this channel is to promote Australian songs for all to listen to. You might even learn something about Australian history while doing so.

The videos on this channel are for Educational and Historic purposes, and because of that, are not monotised.

If you enjoy these videos and want to share it, please do so and promote this channel while you're at it.

Cheers!

- The Grand Bogan