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This presentation is the third of five video lectures that make up the "Introduction to the United States Constitution" course.

Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, is our teacher for this course.

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Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of five video lectures that make up the "Introduction to the United States Constitution" course.

Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, is our teacher for this course.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Earlier in August (2018) someone, apparently affiliated with Harvard, made a claim that coconut oil is "poison." So, this doctor responded.

This presentation is the first of five video lectures that make up the "Introduction to the United States Constitution" course.

Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, is our teacher for this course.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

From the late-2017 "Heal Your Hunger Workshop" is this very brief excerpt with Dr. Tom O'Bryan, DC, CCN, DACBN.

This presentation is the second of two video lectures that make up the "Restoring Economic Liberty" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

(Note that this pair of lectures is the last of this 10-part series, and so will conclude this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The next course to be presented, "Introduction to the United States Constitution," should be available on this same schedule.)

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of two video lectures that make up the "Restoring Economic Liberty" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

(Note that this pair of lectures is the last of this 10-part series, and so will conclude this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The next course to be presented, "Introduction to the United States Constitution," should be available on this same schedule.)

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that make up the "Case Study of The Great Recession" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "Case Study of The Great Recession" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Case Study of The Great Recession" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

When someone, probably a medical person, tells you that such-and-such a drug/procedure/whatever is good for you, and then gives you a statistic as to why, be sure to ask them if they are presenting "absolute risk" or "relative risk." In this beautifully simple and brief video, Dr. Gigerenzer explains not only the difference between the two, but why this is a moral issue.

A nurse with "37 years practicing experience" is charged with "manslaughter, negligence and perverting the course of justice...."

"Health officials have emphasised it's not an issue with the vaccine...."

The investigation is still on-going yet "[h]ealth officials" are absolutely certain that "it's not an issue with the vaccine." Since this determination has already been made, it's safe to presume that any investigation(s) will not include the vaccine itself.

So what's the point of having a trial?

Dr. Angell is, among other things, the former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine. This presentation was delivered on October 19, 2009, at the University of Montana.

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that make up the "Monetary Theory" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "Monetary Theory" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for most of this "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course. The exception is the first and last parts, both of which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Monetary Theory" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that make up the "Keynesianism and Macroeconomics" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "Keynesianism and Macroeconomics" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Keynesianism and Macroeconomics" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that make up the "Incentive and the 'Information Problem'" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "Incentive and the 'Information Problem'" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

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Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Incentive and the 'Information Problem'" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that makes up the "The Role of Profit" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "The Role of Profit" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

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Created 12 months ago.

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CategoryEducation