WNk85

WNk85

This presentation is the third of three video lectures that makes up the "The Role of Profit" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

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Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "The Role of Profit" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "The Role of Profit" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the third (and final) of three video lectures that make up the "Supply and Equilibrium" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of three video lectures that make up the "Supply and Equilibrium" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Supply and Equilibrium" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Supply and Equilibrium" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Increasingly, I find, "detoxification" is a much-talked about issue, whether it be home or body. In this presentation from the Sophia Health Institute (http://www.SophiaHI.com), Dr. Klinghardt presents on body detoxification, specifically the brain.

With the ever-growing number of people having to one degree or another either autism or epilepsy (sometimes both), it behooves us, I think, to carefully consider what Dr. Klinghardt has to tell us.

Finally, look here for other presentations by Dr. Klinghardt, all of which I think will be of great interest and value to you.

This presentation is the third (and final) of three video lectures that make up the "Understanding Demand" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the second of the three video lectures (3a, 3b & 3c) that make up the "Understanding Demand" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This presentation is the first of three video lectures that make up the "Understanding Demand" portion of the 10-part "The Principles of Free-Market Economics" course.

Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy, is our teacher for this "Understanding Demand" set of lectures, and will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this
time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This is Part 2c, titled "How Markets Work," of the 10-part course titled "The Principles of Free-Market Economics." There is also a Part 2b (the actual lecture for this part) and a Part 2ac (the intro), both of which are companions to this video.

This is the post-lecture Q&A, with Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy. Professor Wolfram will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This is Part 2b, titled "How Markets Work," of the 10-part course titled "The Principles of Free-Market Economics." There is also a Part 2a (the intro) and a Part 2c (the post-lecture Q&A), both of which are companions to this video.

Also, this lecture is the primary lecture for this Part 2, and begins the actual coursework, with Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy. Professor Wolfram will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This is Part 2a, titled "How Markets Work," of the 10-part course titled "The Principles of Free-Market Economics." There is also a Part 2b (the actual lecture for this part) and a Part 2c (the post-lecture Q&A), both of which are companions to this video.

Also, this lecture, titled "Two Economists on a Bus," begins the actual coursework, with Professor Gary Woflram, Hillsdale's William E. Simon Professor of Economics & Public Policy. Professor Wolfram will be in all the remaining parts of this course, with the exception of the final part, which will be with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this
time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Jack Webb visits Johnny Carson, and together they manage to make it all the way through the story of the "Copper Clappers."

This is Part 1b, titled "Free Market Economics and the American Founding," of the 10-part course titled "The Principles of Free-Market Economics." There is also a Part 1a that is a companion to this video.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.) Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

This is Part 1a, titled "Free Market Economics and the American Founding," of the 10-part course titled "The Principles of Free-Market Economics." There is also a Part 1b that is a companion to this video.

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.) Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Producer, director and cinemaphotographer Del Bigtree (Vaxxed, The Doctors, Sex and Sensuality, et al.) wants to debate one of his "favorite reporters, John Oliver" on the topic of vaccines. Again, this is from "HighWire with Del Bigtree."

This month's presentation originates from Hollywood, Florida, which is the location for the Institute for Functional Medicine's 2018 Annual International Conference.

This month's topic is: Reversing Autoimmunity.

Dr. Christine Schaffner with the Sophia Health Institute presents "Tonsils, Teeth & TVAM: Identifying Interference Fields in Recovering Brain Health."

Visit Sophia Health Institute at www.SophiaHI.com.

As is the case with the other videos I present on behalf of Sophia Health Institute, I am not in any way connected to them, and receive no remuneration from them, or anyone else, via the video itself and/or any links provided.

For decades Dr. Klinghardt has brought to the world at large his pioneering work on treating autism, and most recently he gave a pivotal talk at the Autism One Conference on the Safe Uses of Suramin and Other Anti-Retroviral Approaches to Autism.

It is our privilege to share this talk with you, and to highlight the incredible advances made with anti-retroviral protocols on autism.

What is discussed in this one-hour presentation?

* How are retroviruses affecting all of humanity?

* Autism treatment basics and EMFs

* Immune signaling by CBDs

* Employing and exploring Suramin

* Scutellaria/baicalin, and quercetin

* Purinergic and endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of the immune system

* Pathophysiology of purinergic signaling

* Role of purinergic and endocannabinoid signaling in neural, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal stem cell maintenance and differentiation

* The Role of ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 in immunity and inflammation

* Use of CD39 and CD73 companion diagnostics to monitor efficacy of therapy targeting purinergic and endocannabinoid signaling

* Combination therapies targeting endocannabinoid and purinergic signaling systems

Please share this video and invite others to view it as well: https://chicenter.lpages.co/dr-klinghardt-on-autism/

Thank you,

Sophia Health Institute (www.SophiaHI.com)

A look at some of the financials -- people and scenarios -- apparently tied to 9/11.

Dr. Joseph Mercola, of Mercola.com, interviews Dr. Zach Bush, an allopathically trained and triple board-certified MD. Drs. Mercola and Bush discuss the decline in soil quality and the corresponding drop in food quality.

Hand-wrangling some large and fiesty catfish. :)

A Puerto Rican youth is on trial for murder, accused of knifing his father to death. The twelve jurors retire to the jury room, having been admonished that the defendant is innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt and, if convicted, will face the death penalty. Eleven of the jurors vote for conviction, each for reasons of his own. The sole holdout is Juror #8, played by Henry Fonda. As Fonda's character persuades the weary jurors to re-examine the evidence, we learn the backstory of each man. (https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/1000013_12_angry_men?)

Absolutely one of my top fiction favorites; a must-see film.

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Created 10 months ago.

36 videos

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