WNk85

WNk85

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This sixth Q&A features Michael Ward, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This sixth lecture, titled "Lewis' Literary Criticism: The Value of Indirect Communication," is given by Michael Ward, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

The cover photo serves as a reminder to me of how very, very much I do not miss John McCain. Sic semper tyrannis....

Ron Paul finally gets the opportunity to better-explain some of his positions.

I consider this man, Ron Paul, as a celebrity of sorts and elected official, to be one of this generation's finest examples of Constitutional behavior, understanding and defense. He is a hero to millions of liberty lovers -- dead, alive and those yet to be born. May his legacy embolden and guide the rest of us back to the once-great Constitutional ways of the United States of America.

Thank you, Dr. Paul, to both you and your dear wife Carol. We shall always be indebted to you, and will do our best to honor you.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This fifth Q&A features David M. Whalen, Provost and Professor of English, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This fifth lecture, titled "Lewis' Fiction: The Space Trilogy - A Cosmos of Old Wars & New Battles," is given by David M. Whalen, Provost and Professor of English, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This fourth Q&A features David M. Whalen, Provost and Professor of English, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This fourth lecture, titled "Lewis' Fiction: Narnia and the Storied Moral World," is given by David M. Whalen, Provost and Professor of English, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This third lecture, titled "Lewis' Apologetics: Imagination and Reason, Part Two," is given by Michael Ward, Hillsdale College Distinguished Visiting Professor.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This second Q&A features Michael Ward, Hillsdale College Distinguished Visiting Professor, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This second lecture, titled "Lewis' Apologetics: Imagination and Reason, Part One," is given by Michael Ward, Hillsdale College Distinguished Visiting Professor.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This first Q&A features Larry P. Arnn, President, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This third Q&A features Michael Ward, Hillsdale College Distinguished Visiting Professor, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 9-part Hillsdale College course titled "An Introduction to C.S. Lewis' Writings and Significance." This first lecture, titled "Introduction: Men Without Chests," is given by Larry P. Arnn, President, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This tenth Q&A features Larry P. Arnn, President, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Also, this is the final Q&A in this "The Presidency and the Constitution" course. I trust you have found it a wise investment of your time and energy.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This tenth lecture, titled "Reviving the Constitutional Executive Power," is given by Larry P. Arnn, President, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Also, this is the final Lecture in this "The Presidency and the Constitution" course. I trust you have found it a wise investement of your time and energy.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This ninth lecture, titled "The Imperial Presidency," is given by Mickey Craig, William and Berniece Grewcock Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This ninth Q&A features Mickey Craig, William and Berniece Grewcock Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

(Corrected Version)

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This seventh Q&A features Robert Portteus, Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This eighth Q&A features Kevin Portteus, Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This eighth lecture, titled "The Administrative Presidency," is given by Kevin Portteus, Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Videos should be viewable starting between 0000UTC and 0600UTC on Fridays.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This sixth Q&A features John Grant, Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College, in conversation with John Miller, Hillsdale College's Director of the Herbert H. Dow II Program in American Journalism.

This Q&A, as well as the remaining Q&As in the course, has a Lecture counterpart that should be watched before viewing the Q&A.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

Presenting the 10-part Hillsdale College course titled "The Presidency and the Constitution." This sixth lecture, titled "The War Power," is given by John Grant, Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College.

This lecture, as well as the remaining lectures in the course, has a Q&A counterpart that should be watched after going through the Lecture.

Carpe diem!

<><><><><><>

Hillsdale College (https://www.Hillsdale.edu) has many online courses available for free to all. Most of these courses are on a 10-week schedule; that is, one lecture/Q&A per week for 10 weeks. I plan on making these available on that same one-per-week schedule, regardless the overall number of weeks involved in a given course (5, 10, 11...whatever). Each course usually involves a "Lecture" and a "Q&A." Some, however, may have an "Introduction" (or something similarly titled) in addition to the Lecture and Q&A. Whatever video content is available for that week will be posted at the same time, if I have it all (which, at this time, I do).

Considering how easy it is to participate in these free-to-watch courses via the Hillsdale website, I encourage visitors here to consider that. For those who, for whatever reason, would rather view this content elsewhere, I am making them available here. (I believe there is no copyright issue, but I make no guarantees that the content will always be available here. Another reason, perhaps, to consider following the coursework via the Hillsdale website.)

At present I have available 16 courses, most of which are on a 10-week schedule. At the first posting for a new course, I will endeavor to properly indicate the number of weeks for that particular course. There are more than 16 courses available from Hillsdale, but I have chosen only these 16. (Note that this number will likely grow, as Hillsdale continues to add courses.)

Uploads will usually occur from about 0000UTC to 0600UTC on Friday.

Although founded in America in 1844, Hillsdale College's message is, I believe, relevant to all people everywhere. However, the overwhelming majority of the coursework focuses on America's heritage, Constitution, overall form and workings of government, and God.

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Created 1 year, 4 months ago.

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CategoryEducation