#aristotle

Intro to Aristotle's lecture on Topics applied to the subject of Money embellished by an understanding of Physics.

2 days, 8 hours ago

00:00 Principles of Physics
02:50 Intermediate Without Change

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

This is the text to Part 1 of 9. Although it is less than 2 minutes, a sort of preamble, but it was uploaded twice and it would not play. Will try again some day...

"When arguments reason to false conclusions then the right solution is to demolish the point upon which the falsity depends. One who demolishes this point gives the solution to the argument completely. For it is not enough to object but the reason for the falsity should be demonstrated. Likewise, in genera and differentia and all the terms rendered in definitions one should frame accounts in lieu of their names and then see if there is any discrepancy between them. Lastly, as contributing to knowledge and philosophic wisdom the power of discerning and holding in one view the results of either of two hypothesis is no mean instrument, but for one who can do this it then only remains to make a right choice of one of them."
- Aristotle, Topics [paraphrased by OCS]

These last few statements are the essence of Aristotle's lecture on Topics as it pertains to this lecture segmented into 9 parts and by the end it ought to be clear as to their influence upon it. In addition to Topics, the lecture also draws upon these other lectures of Aristotle's: First Philosophy, Prior Analytics, Posterior Analytics, Eudemian Ethics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, Rhetoric, and Physics.

3 days, 17 hours ago

00:00 Human as a Principle of Action and Exchange
04:48 Aristotle's Explanation that Money is Justice

(The cut from this take is my favorite of these 9 parts for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

3 days, 22 hours ago

Audiobooks: https://mega.nz/folder/utchyAAK#GTVl1fINpekEch95xj8Fmg
Chaptered MP4 in higher quality 4.3GB https://archive.org/details/abooks1
2GB https://seed125.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/GMxiaA0LwrDz.mp4
Two contrasting reflections by Aristotle which cover a very particular ground. In On the Soul, Aristotle presents his view of the ‘life essence’ which, he argues, is possessed by living things whether plants, animals or humans. Not a ‘soul’ in the generally accepted Western use of the term, this ‘soul’ he says is a life force that is indivisible from the organism that possesses it. The essay is divided into three Books. Presenting his concept in Book I, he further describes the structure of the ‘souls’ of plants, animals and humans in Book II and Book III. In The Parva Naturalia (Little Physical Treatises), Aristotle continues his investigation into the biology of life and the links between body and ‘soul’. It consists of seven essays: Sense and Sensibilia, On Memory, On Sleep, On Dreams, On Divination in Sleep, On Length and Shortness of Life, On Youth, Old Age, Life and Death, and Respiration. Translation by A. J. Smith. Translation by J I Beare and G R T Ross.
http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/tag/aristotle

00:00:00 On the Soul
03:50:56 The Parva Naturalia
03:52:12 Sense and Sensibilia
05:30:22 On Memory
06:04:42 On Sleep
06:38:08 On Dreams
07:06:37 On Divination in Sleep
07:21:12 On Length and Shortness of Life translated
07:39:54 On Youth, Old Age, Life and Death, and Respiration

Background video: https://youtu.be/2OEL4P1Rz04

5 days, 14 hours ago

00:00 Ex as Out of Change
02:49 Conductivity of Exchange
05:20 Justice of Reciprocity
07:17 Definition

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

5 days, 17 hours ago

00:00 Principles of Nature, Laws of Humans
01:30 Pursuit of Happiness
02:42 Motion as Compulsion, Action as Choice
03:27 Contrary of Exchange

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

5 days, 19 hours ago

00:00 Indoctrination
03:30 Contrary of Money
04:49 Stealing

(Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

5 days, 20 hours ago

Is this sea of currents on the level or not? The same object flowing along the medium of exchange, the activity of desirable work, this intermediate, currency, can be introduced as counterfeit and then used down current as money. (Part 5 of 9 is my favorite for the obvious reason, but it may also be the most important part as it reveals the right solution to the contemporary falsity of this topic.)

6 days, 2 hours ago

Audiobooks: https://mega.nz/folder/utchyAAK#GTVl1fINpekEch95xj8Fmg
Chaptered MP4 in higher quality 5GB https://archive.org/details/abooks1
2.2GB https://seed171.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/rm6cBJ3fg8Ky.mp4
No less a figure than Bertrand Russell remarked that Aristotle’s Physics was ‘extremely influential and dominated science until the time of Galileo’. This was despite the fact that this work is as much a collection of ‘lectures on nature’ rather than dealing with the science of physics as we understand the term. Aristotle considers ‘the principles and causes of change, or movement’ behind both animate and inanimate things.’
It is philosophy, not science, but over centuries affected the views of those involved in the ‘natural sciences.’ The text emerged from the Lyceum, the school founded by Aristotle, and is accepted to be a compilation of texts, some of which – but perhaps not all – is by Aristotle. Regardless of authorship, its importance is unquestioned. It is divided into eight books, (and further divided into shorter chapters) and begins with an examination into change – and Aristotle’s main ideas of matter and form. The investigative net is thrown wide to encompass infinity, causation, movement, void, time and continuity. The study concludes in Book VIII (the longest book) with a consideration of the universe, its nature – eternal or finite – and questions the existence of gods, God (a Prime Mover figure?); and the continued existence of motion. Translation: R. P. Hardie and R. K Gaye.
http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/tag/aristotle/

00:00:11.000 Book 1
01:02:09.000 Book 2
01:58:18.000 Book 3
02:52:17.000 Book 4
04:33:57.000 Book 5
05:28:12.000 Book 6
06:49:09.000 Book 7
07:37:52.000 Book 8

Background video: https://youtu.be/2OEL4P1Rz04

6 days, 8 hours ago

Audiobooks: https://mega.nz/folder/utchyAAK#GTVl1fINpekEch95xj8Fmg
Chaptered MP4 in higher quality 7.4GB https://archive.org/details/abooks1
3.2GB https://seed122.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/00IqNNCK0vWJ.mp4
Aristotle’s Metaphysics was the first major study of the subject of metaphysics – in other words, an inquiry into ‘first philosophy’, or ‘wisdom’. It differs from ‘Physics’ which is concerned with the natural world: things which are subject to the laws of nature, things that move and change, are measurable. In Metaphysics, the study falls on ‘being qua being’ – being insofar as it is being; the causes and principles of being, the causes and principles of substances. Aristotle asks ‘what is existence’, how can things continue to exist yet change, and how can we best understand the world we live in. The work as it has come down to us is a compilation of Aristotle’s writing on the subject made in Alexandria in the first century CE, and it proved enormously influential from the Greeks onwards, through the medieval and renaissance periods. In Metaphysics, Aristotle absorbed Plato’s view that nature is eternal and unchangeable while accepting that we live in a world that appears full of change. A challenging work, Metaphysics is divided into 14 Books. It begins with the causes of things, questions the existence of God, the understanding of ‘being’ and the concept of ‘substance’. It proceeds to consider ‘actuality’, ‘potentiality’ and ‘unity’. This first recording, using the clear translation by W. D. Ross, is presented in a measured and comprehensible manner by James Cameron Stewart.
http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/tag/aristotle/

00:00:10 Book 1
01:21:48 Book 2
01:34:49 Book 3
02:33:04 Book 4
03:48:44 Book 5
05:31:49 Book 6
05:53:01 Book 7
07:41:26 Book 8
08:13:19 Book 9
09:05:45 Book 10
10:03:06 Book 11
11:17:13 Book 12
12:16:46 Book 13
13:41:59 Book 14

Background video: https://youtu.be/2OEL4P1Rz04

1 week ago

https://mega.nz/folder/utchyAAK#GTVl1fINpekEch95xj8Fmg - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/on-the-soul-and-parva-naturalia
Two contrasting reflections by Aristotle which cover very particular ground. In 'On the Soul', Aristotle presents his view of the 'life essence' which, he argues, is possessed by living things whether plants, animals or humans.

Not a 'soul' in the generally accepted Western use of the term, this 'soul', he says, is a life force that is indivisible from the organism that possesses it. The essay is divided into three books. Presenting his concept in book I, he further describes the structure of the 'souls' of plants, animals and humans in book II and book III.

In 'The Parva Naturalia' ('Little Physical Treatises'), Aristotle continues his investigation into the biology of life and the links between body and 'soul'. It consists of seven essays: 'Sense and Sensibilia', 'On Memory', 'On Sleep', 'On Dreams', 'On Divination in Sleep', 'On Length and Shortness of Life', 'On Youth', 'Old Age', 'Life and Death' and 'Respiration'.

Translation by A. J. Smith.

MP4: https://seed167.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/HpTn2JSy8OpO.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs & https://youtu.be/yVOw5fsUCfQ & https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E

00:00:00 On the Soul
03:50:55 Parva Naturalia

3 months, 1 week ago

https://mega.nz/folder/utchyAAK#GTVl1fINpekEch95xj8Fmg - http://ukemiaudiobooks.com/politics
The title Politics literally means ‘the things concerning the city’. Here, Aristotle considers the important role that politics plays in the life of the community and its contribution to harmonious and virtuous existence.

It is divided into eight books and was a cornerstone in political philosophy for centuries despite certain features - including attitudes towards slaves and women - clearly placing its conclusions and advice within the confines of Athenian society of the fourth century BCE. Aristotle’s fundamental view is that the individual needs the city more than the city needs the individual, not least because a well-ordered city-state offers obvious benefits beyond simply self-protection and commerce. It makes possible a broader life, allowing in addition education and leisure, leading its citizens towards a life of virtue.

In book two, Aristotle considers the best regime for the city, looking at the three main forms of his time - democracy, oligarchy/aristocracy and monarchy. He considers the qualification to be a citizen and participate in the political process - offering a wider view than Plato, for example.

Revolution, change, constitutional developments, insurrections - these issues of instability are discussed with references to specific examples. And in later books he proposes the conditions for the best state, the ideal state, ‘for a state is not a community of living beings only, but a community of equals, aiming at the best life possible’.

MP4: https://seed163.bitchute.com/BNThhGvKqCtC/upmykw7Sx8to.mp4
Background video: https://youtu.be/KkhGT997hjs & https://youtu.be/yVOw5fsUCfQ & https://youtu.be/egyIeygdS_E

3 months, 3 weeks ago

This video was manually imported. Originally Published date: May 7, 2019

Visit https://lp.hillsdale.edu/aristotle-enroll/ to watch all ten lectures today!

Lecture Overview:
In Book I of the Politics, Aristotle writes that “man alone among the animals has speech.” This unique faculty leads to man’s concern for the good and enables him to form political communities — which exist for the sake of living well.

Course Overview:
In the Nicomachean Ethics—the first book written on the subject of how best to live—Aristotle argues that human happiness chiefly depends upon a person’s character, which is formed by making good choices. This course examines Aristotle’s teachings about human nature, the meaning of the good, and the virtues necessary for happiness. Students will not only learn what Aristotle says about the good life, but will also explore ways to put this knowledge to work.

4 months, 2 weeks ago

The complete Audio Book of Aristotle's lecture can be find right here on Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/upmykw7Sx8to/
Weary from looking up favorite lines and passages and deciphering various styles and colors of ink, pencil, and highlights accumulated over the years as marginalia or underlines and circles in the text, I saved it to my warm memory chip instead for ease of access. The arrangement is introductory to the novice and summary for the expert. Embellishments, ad libs, and faux pas can be expected in this format, but at the expense of context and contemporary application? Not at all.

This translation is from 1885 by Benjamin Jowett and was the first work of Aristotle to be translated as part of the multi-decade project of the Oxford Translations which was completed in the 1950s. However, the first Greek to English translation of Politics was titled as A Treatise on Government translated by William Ellis in 1776. Thomas Jefferson owned a copy. The founders of the United States were familiar with Aristotle’s analysis of governments and learned well enough to create a superior Constitution.

This is an excerpt from Aristotle in One Take at https://www.bitchute.com/video/HxNikHKjCUyH/

4 months, 2 weeks ago

Money equalizes the exchange of disproportionate work. Counterfeit maintains the disproportion. This is an excerpt from Aristotle in One Take found at https://www.bitchute.com/video/Qkf9vJbi8JD2/

4 months, 2 weeks ago

04:07 FIRST PHILOSOPHY
In this lecture and several others, Aristotle, refers to this study as First Philosophy. It was not until centuries later after the work was found did academics rename it to Metaphysics. None of the Greek philosophers discussed the nature of existence as coming after physics, let alone name it as such. To call it such is an example of the Turning of Names, meant to deceive that what it is is what it is not. The term has taken on an air of the mysterious, claiming to sense without the senses, to suppose not demonstrate, haughty sophistication and exactly what that implies; the absence of analytics.

First Philosophy was The book for authorities to eschew and during the Inquisition of the 13th century, the pope banned it for over 50 years, along with Aristotle's other works on Nature, from being taught at the University of Paris. It was this work that Aquinas was sequestered for so many years with the mission of reconciling it with church dogma. They are irreconcilable, contraries, for the reason that Aristotle was against Plato.

What Aristotle discusses as simply matter of fact then regarding the views on this subject of the pre-Socratics, Socrates, and Plato, now places him as one of the best historians of them. Much of what we know about the other philosophers thoughts, especially Plato's, are detailed by Aristotle. The method at the onset of First Philosophy is dialectical deduction, beginning with the most reputable opinions and then proceeding to either affirm or deny them by deduction. Aristotle wrote, edited, and added chapters to Topics (the methodology and study of dialectical deductions) over the course of 13 years (age 31 to 44). First Philosophy began 8 years later and took 5 years to complete. As best I can tell, this was his last major work.

My take presented here is the most recent and I consider it the best one based on content alone. The focus has always been on the principles used to deny his contemporaries conclusions and to affirm his own. These are found in the first several parts of the work and when applied to other parts later in the work it appears that key themes later claimed were grossly mistranslated or are outright insertions.

Cover: Archimedes Thoughtful by Domenico Fetti
Recommended reading for tributary facts about Aristotle and his works: The Aristotle Adventure by Burgess Laughlin.

6 months ago

00:03:21 POLITICS (alternate version I regard as secondary)
00:29:19 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS (abbreviated)
00:48:25 FIRST PHILOSOPHY
NE is abbreviated here since this take was about getting these alternate passages from Politics recorded. I regard this presentation of Politics as secondary to the other takes and not recommended until after the primary take is understood. The purpose in this secondary take is to present the introduction to Politics, pertaining to rulers, subjects, and the nature of communities and states, outside of the modern Academics view who focus too much on Book 1 and a condition that is presently non-existent. Academics say little of the later themes in Politics such as the corruption of politics by money and special interests, the supremacy of the middle class, the variations of oligarchy and democracy, the union of these two, constitutional governance, the nature of tyrants, and above all that ethics begets politics, or, prezactly, politics IS ethics. The soul of Aristotle's Politics is Book 7, of which none of that is in this take. I recommend reading Politics deductively, Book 7 first and 1 last (Book 8 as addendum).

NE is abbreviated because I went into that and FP unexpectedly and was 'cold' after several months out of thought. I forgot the leads and turns I use to guide me along. Since it is incomplete here, then, this presentation of NE is also not recommended for someone visiting this site without hearing the complete version in other takes. Likewise, I would not recommend that anyone interested in Aristotle's Ethics study the Nicomachean lecture (named after his son) without also studying the Eudemian lecture (named after his daughter). Eudemian Ethics is eschewed by Academics since it gives the more scathing critique of Plato's theory of the Ideas. Academics both of a classical and progressive ilk, although they like to claim they are vastly different from one another, rest upon the same fundamental principle; their allegiance to Plato's Ideas. This invariably leads them both to the same end; the common bad, stealing by law.

10 months, 3 weeks ago

Originally published January 30, 2018 on Counter-Currents/North American New Right. Re-published September 6, 2019 on Counter-Currents TV (https://www.bitchute.com/channel/counter-currentstv/).

Related article, discussion, and/or transcript at: https://www.counter-currents.com/2015/06/interview-with-curt-doolittle/

More from Counter-Currents: https://www.counter-currents.com/
Support us: https://www.counter-currents.com/donations/support-counter-currents/

This video was previously published on the original CounterCurrentsTV YouTube channel, which was banned in June 2019. Fortunately, a viewer had made a backup using youtube-dl (https://ytdl-org.github.io/youtube-dl/index.html), and the channel contents were later restored to BitChute using https://gitlab.com/l-hex/bitchute-cli.

1 year ago

Today, we celebrate something far more important than the birthday of a nation, we celebrate the birth of a philosophy brought to life.

It Be Demons We Are Battlin
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Awakening or Reckoning
https://youtu.be/aDtUBrIxbgM

What is a Classical Liberal?
https://youtu.be/MSmR9mtTqfo

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1 year, 2 months ago

[MIRROR] Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIKHmUWICWc

Martha Nussbaum discusses Aristotle with Bryan Magee in an interview from a 1987 BBC program.

1 year, 2 months ago

00:02:01 EUDEMIAN ETHICS
00:28:30 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
01:17:11 POLITICS
01:53:10 FIRST PHILOSOPHY

1 year, 3 months ago

Whenever we have knowledge and understand what any thing is we have also come to learn its contrary.

1 year, 3 months ago

Reflection on the soul.

1 year, 5 months ago

00:02:33 EUDEMIAN ETHICS
00:27:25 NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
01:14:40 POLITICS
01:47:57 FIRST PHILOSOPHY

1 year, 5 months ago

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For a large chunk of history, Aristotle was known simply as 'The Philosopher'. Professor Peter Adamson--host of The History of Philosophy podcast--lays down the Master's vital truths on the virtuous life in under ten minutes.

BUY this poster: https://illustratedphilosophy.com/shop/aristotle-on-ethics-happiness-and-virtue/

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1 year, 6 months ago

Money, by its principle (for that for the sake of which it is), is the re-presentation of work. It later becomes administered by law and it is in our power to change it and make it useless. A law can ruin any activity.

1 year, 7 months ago

This is part 12 of a reading of Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy - The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers".
Come back for a new part every day.

This book is public domain in the States, and can be found at:
archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.264687

I was inspired by another philosopher on bitchute who uploads readings of various philosophical works (including part of this one).
Check him out at:
www.bitchute.com/channel/machinephilosophy/

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2 years, 1 month ago

This is part 11 of a reading of Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy - The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers".

Come back for a new part every day.

This book is public domain in the States, and can be found at:
archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.264687

I was inspired by another philosopher on bitchute who uploads readings of various philosophical works (including part of this one).
Check him out at:
www.bitchute.com/channel/machinephilosophy/

Follow me on
Twitter: twitter.com/CalmCast
Gab: gab.ai/CalmCast
Minds: www.minds.com/CalmAnder
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Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC8DPb29y…iew_as=subscriber

2 years, 1 month ago

This is part 10 of a reading of Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy - The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers".

Come back for a new part every day.

This book is public domain in the States, and can be found at:
archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.264687

I was inspired by another philosopher on bitchute who uploads readings of various philosophical works (including part of this one).
Check him out at:
www.bitchute.com/channel/machinephilosophy/

Follow me on
Twitter: twitter.com/CalmCast
Gab: gab.ai/CalmCast
Minds: www.minds.com/CalmAnder
Discord: discord.gg/p4jh5bc
Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC8DPb29y…iew_as=subscriber

2 years, 1 month ago

This is part 9 of a reading of Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy - The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers".

Come back for a new part every day.

This book is public domain in the States, and can be found at:
archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.264687

I was inspired by another philosopher on bitchute who uploads readings of various philosophical works (including part of this one).
Check him out at:
www.bitchute.com/channel/machinephilosophy/

Follow me on
Twitter: twitter.com/CalmCast
Gab: gab.ai/CalmCast
Minds: www.minds.com/CalmAnder
Discord: discord.gg/p4jh5bc
Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC8DPb29y…iew_as=subscriber

2 years, 1 month ago

This is part 8 of a reading of Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy - The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers".

Come back for a new part every day.

This book is public domain in the States, and can be found at:
archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.264687

I was inspired by another philosopher on bitchute who uploads readings of various philosophical works (including part of this one).
Check him out at:
www.bitchute.com/channel/machinephilosophy/

Follow me on
Twitter: twitter.com/CalmCast
Gab: gab.ai/CalmCast
Minds: www.minds.com/CalmAnder
Discord: discord.gg/p4jh5bc
Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC8DPb29y…iew_as=subscriber

2 years, 1 month ago