#edgarallanpoe

A city ruled by death...fun times.

2 days, 5 hours ago

We all love a good drink.....and adventure....right?

4 days, 16 hours ago

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love—
I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,
Went envying her and me—
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we—
Of many far wiser than we—
And neither the angels in Heaven above
Nor the demons down under the sea
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

6 days, 18 hours ago

Who doesn't like a good ole party?

1 week, 2 days ago

Well there are worst ways one could go...this one is a tad sadistic though.

1 week, 4 days ago

Cats are snakes...ok?!

1 week, 4 days ago

Son cœur est un luth suspendu;
Sitôt qu'on le touche il résonne.
-De Béranger.

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The picture used is an illustration from "The Works of Edgar Allan Poe", (1884) by Robert Swain Gifford

Well, I definitely got ennuyé wrong. What a word. Even the pronunciation by google translate sounded God-awful. I'd need to hear it in person from a native French speaker to have any chance at it.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/932/932-h/932-h.htm

For those who ever played D&D way back in the day (as in, the old Moldvay red Basic book, and the Cook blue Expert book), you will recognize the ending having been used in the module X2, Château d'Amberville, although the male character in the module is named Charles instead of Roderick, while the female retains the name Madeline.

2 weeks, 2 days ago

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The picture used is Yan Dargent's illustration for Jules Verne's "Edgar Poe et ses œuvres" (1864).

Dun = debt collector; used in this story in the plural, duns - not to be confused with dunce ;-)

Pemmican - you can find an entire series on this food item on a very informative channel I encourage you to subscribe to, if you still have anything to do with youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_vLuMobHCI&list=PL4e4wpjna1vxXNa7kCTF3i2LzFE9uKPPU

1 Paris foot = 0.32483943 meters, or 12.79 inches

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap04

2 weeks, 3 days ago

What ho! what ho! this fellow is dancing mad!
He hath been bitten by the Tarantula.
-All in the Wrong.

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The picture used is "Eyed click beetle Alaus oculatus, Poolesville, Maryland, USA" by Henryhartley, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en)

Dat Gullah accent, tho... What can I say, I am a white-boi Yankee by birth and never heard it growing up, so I don't really have any real-life reference point for it, only the phonetics of what Poe wrote into the text.

Swammerdam = Jan Swammerdam, a 17th century Dutch entomologist.

The Avoirdupois system of weights is the one the English-speaking world today is most familiar with, where 1 pound = 16 ounces. (To be contrasted with the less commonly used Troy system, where 1 pound = 12 ounces.)

Golconda is a city in India noted for its proximity to an extremely productive diamond mine that has produced many famous diamonds, not least of which the blue Hope diamond.

The cryptogram in the story, if you care to give it a try for yourself:

53‡‡†305))6*;4826)4‡)4‡);806*;48†8¶60))85;1‡(;:‡*8†83(88)5*†;46(;88*96*?;8)*‡(;485);5*†2:*‡(;4956*2(5*—4)8¶8*;4069285);)6†8)4‡‡;1(‡9;48081;8:8‡1;48†85;4)485†528806*81(‡9;48;(88;4(‡?34;48)4‡;161;:188;‡?;

‡ = diesis
† = obelus
¶ = pilcrow

Follow along at: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap05

I wasn't paying close attention when I first set about this story and it was a lot longer than I was expecting. A two-hour long recording session. That hurt. Will have to give my throat a rest day after this.

2 weeks, 6 days ago

Nil sapientiæ odiosius acumine nimio.
-Seneca.

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The third and final installment of the ratiocination series featuring Dupin.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.1

3 weeks, 3 days ago

A SEQUEL TO "THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE."

Es giebt eine Reihe idealischer Begebenheiten, die der Wirklichkeit parallel lauft. Selten fallen sie zusammen. Menschen und zufalle modificiren gewohulich die idealische Begebenheit, so dass sie unvollkommen erscheint, und ihre Folgen gleichfalls unvollkommen sind. So bei der Reformation; statt des Protestantismus kam das Lutherthum hervor.

There are ideal series of events which run parallel with the real ones. They rarely coincide. Men and circumstances generally modify the ideal train of events, so that it seems imperfect, and its consequences are equally imperfect. Thus with the Reformation; instead of Protestantism came Lutheranism.

—Novalis. Moral Ansichten.

The picture used is taken from "Tales of Mystery, Imagination, & Humour: And Poems By Edgar Allan Poe", printed and published by Henry Vizetelly, 1852.

A 'rod' is 16.5 feet, or 5 meters.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap08

My reading pace for this story is a touch hurried in spots, but even with the faster reading pace, this is still a very long story. The recording session for it lasted three hours. If the quality of my voice seems to deteriorate, that is not just your imagination, my voice really suffered. I am not one given much to talking at all, and certainly not for three hours uninterrupted. It was really tough on my voice.

3 weeks, 4 days ago

What song the Syrens sang, or what name Achilles assumed when he hid himself among women, although puzzling questions, are not beyond all conjecture.

-Sir Thomas Browne, "Urn-Burial."

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The picture used is "The sailor's face flushed up; he started to his feet and grasped his cudgel" by Byam Shaw for "Selected Tales of Mystery" (London : Sidgwick & Jackson, 1909)

The game of draughts = checkers

Whist is a card game that was the precusor to present-day Bridge.

The French at the very end there: "de nier ce qui est, et d'expliquer ce qui n'est pas."

My reading pace might be a slight bit faster than desirable, but even so it is a very long story.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap07

3 weeks, 5 days ago

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A lot of random French words and phrases strewn about this text. While I am certain I got some of them correct, there are others I am sure must be wrong. C'est la vie :-P

The picture used is a picture by BillBl of the exterior of the Bordeaux wine estate Chateau Haut Brion, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en).

No, this specific chateau was never used as an insane asylum, but it struck me as having the right look and feel for the setting of this story. In any event, being located in southern France, if nothing else it is at least architecturally in the ballpark of what such a place should look like.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.5

1 month ago

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Stay for me there! I will not fail.
To meet thee in that hollow vale.

(Exequy on the death of his wife, by Henry King, Bishop of Chichester.)

The picture used is "Il ponte dei sospiri" by nucce, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.14

1 month ago

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There are multiple ways to pronounce Berenice, including with a hard 'c' of the ancient Greek from which the name derives, and Poe gives no hints on what pronunciation he intended. The other character being named Egaeus also calls Greek to mind. Still, for the modern audience, a soft 'c' will likely sound the most correct, so that is what I went with.

There are quite a few poems and stories where the characters have weird, obscure names of uncertain pronunciation - I wish Poe had left behind some hints on what he expected for the pronunciations he had in mind. Ah well, we muddle long as best we can.

Also, Poe and his love of French. Grrrr!! There's also some Italian and Latin in there for which my pronunciation may be suspect...

Apparently this story generated a storm of complaints at the time it was published, about the violence implicit in the story. Mind you, just implied violence, not violence actually depicted. Still, when you contemplate the implied violence, it is extremely revolting, so I can understand the public disgust with it even without it having been explicitly written into the story.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.21

1 month ago

Impia tortorum longos hic turba furores
Sanguinis innocui, non satiata, aluit.
Sospite nunc patria, fracto nunc funeris antro,
Mors ubi dira fuit vita salusque patent.

[Quatrain composed for the gates of a market to be erected upon the site of the Jacobin Club House at Paris.]

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To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/25525/25525-h/25525-h.htm#chap2.15

1 month ago

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The picture used is an illustration by one Mr. Wogel for Poe's "Tales and poems - vol.2" (Philadelphia: G. Barrie).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2149/2149-h/2149-h.htm#chap3.30

1 month ago

"A Dream within a Dream" by Edgar Allan Poe (poem)

1 month ago

Ce grand malheur, de ne pouvoir être seul.
-La Bruyère.

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The picture used is by Harry Clarke, as an illustration for Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" (1923).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.5

1 month ago

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The picture used is by Arthur Rackham, being an illustration for "Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination" (1935).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.4

1 month ago

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The picture used is by Arthur Rackham, from "Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination" (1935).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.12

1 month, 1 week ago

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It takes until half way through the recording to get to the actual story. But stick with it - there's a nice plot twist at the end :)

The picture used is by Harry Clarke, published in "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" in 1916.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.16

1 month, 1 week ago

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The picture used is "The Masque of the Red Death" by Melancholita, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1064/1064-h/1064-h.htm

I have been wanting to do this one for a long time now, but given how politicized the current pandemic has been, I wanted to wait until the election drama in the USA was over before recording this one.

1 month, 1 week ago

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Pestis eram vivus - moriens tua mors ero.
-Martin Luther

The picture used is "Fire horse - Nightmare - Speed photoshop" by RaquelBC, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.4

The two French sentences near the start of the story:
"vient de ne pouvoir être seuls."
and
"ne demeure qu'un seul fois dans un corps sensible: au reste-un cheval, un chien, un homme même, n'est que la ressemblance peu tangible de ces animaux."

Damn Poe and his love of French! :-P

1 month, 1 week ago

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The picture used is by John Watson Davis, for "Mystery Tales of Edgar Allan Poe", pg 230, published in 1907.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.7

1 month, 2 weeks ago

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The picture used is an illustration by Douglas Percy

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.14

1 month, 2 weeks ago

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Qui n'a plus qu'un moment a vivre
N'a plus rien a dissimuler.
-Quinault—Atys.

New Holland is an old name for Australia, in use for roughly 200 years, until the mid-1850s.

The picture used is an illustration by "Wogel" in "The Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe with Biographical Essay" by John H. Ingram

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap10

Concluding note, by the author:

The "MS. Found in a Bottle," was originally published in 1831, and it was not until many years afterwards that I became acquainted with the maps of Mercator, in which the ocean is represented as rushing, by four mouths, into the (northern) Polar Gulf, to be absorbed into the bowels of the earth; the Pole itself being represented by a black rock, towering to a prodigious height.

1 month, 2 weeks ago

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What say of it? what say [of] CONSCIENCE grim,
That spectre in my path?
—Chamberlayne’s Pharronida.

The picture used is Byam Shaw's illustration for this story for "Selected Tales of Mystery" (London : Sidgwick & Jackson, 1909) on the frontispiece with caption "A masquerade in the palazzo of the Neapolitan Duke Di Broglio"

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.19

1 month, 2 weeks ago

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The picture used is an illustration by Hugo Gernsback for this story created for the "Amazing Stories" magazine, Volume 1, number 2, May 1926.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.5

1 month, 2 weeks ago

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The ways of God in Nature, as in Providence, are not as our ways; nor are the models that we frame any way commensurate to the vastness, profundity, and unsearchableness of His works, which have a depth in them greater than the well of Democritus.
-Joseph Glanville.

The picture used is an illustration by Harry Clarke, published in 1919, for this very story.

Follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.3

1 month, 3 weeks ago

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And the will therein lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor? For God is but a great will pervading all things by nature of its intentness. Man doth not yield himself to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.

-Joseph Glanvill.

The picture used is by Byam Shaw, serving as in illustration for the story in "Selected Tales of Mystery" (London : Sidgwick & Jackson, 1909) on the page to face p. 134, with caption "The thing that was enshrouded advanced boldly and palpably into the middle of the apartment"

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2149/2149-h/2149-h.htm#chap3.28

There are too many pops in this recording, but I have no idea what caused them. Nothing changed in my recording set-up, but it is irritating to me to hear in the editing, so I am sure it is annoying to you, the listener. I tried to edit at least some of them out, but I couldn't get all of them. Sorry about that. I'll have to noodle some on what the possible causes might be and how to avoid them in the future.

That said, I'm not entirely happy with the quality of this hardware, so I may switch back to what I was doing before buying this mic. Nowhere near as convenient or easy to record with, but the quality is definitely much better so I might have to just endure it.

1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Late Editor Of The "Goosetherumfoodle"
By Himself

The picture used is of Henry Mayhew (founder of the magazine "Punch" in 1841) from the 1861 edition of London Labour and the London Poor in Post.

Looks like I changed my pronunciation of Goosetherumfoodle half way through, from a long 'oo' sound to a short 'u' sound. Didn't even realize it until I got to editing. Oops. Oh well, given the length of this one, there's nothing for it.

Follow along at: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.6

1 month, 3 weeks ago

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What chance, good lady, hath bereft you thus?
-Comus.

This story is a follow-on to "How to Write a Blackwood Article". If you haven't listened to that story yet, you should go listen to it first.

The picture used is a 19th century photo by Thomas Keith of the clock tower of St. Giles cathedral in Edinburgh.

I'm kind of surprised at just how often Poe uses the word that here in the 21st century we are no longer supposed to utter. And in the penultimate sentence of this one, no less.

Follow along at: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.8

1 month, 3 weeks ago

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"In the name of the Prophet - figs!!"
-Cry of the Turkish fig-peddler

The picture used is "Ink jar with quill pens" by studentofrhythm, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.7

1 month, 3 weeks ago

Slid, if these be your "passados" and "montantes," I'll have none of them.
-Ned Knowles.

The picture used is "The Floquet-Boulanger duel" from 1888.

The text didn't give a name for the city, just G--n, but Göttingen easily fits the bill for the context of this story, and what would I say otherwise? It's bad enough I have to fumble the ungiven year "18--" used in the text. Why do authors do this sort of thing? It's not just Poe, lots of 19th century authors do this - Victor Hugo is even worse about it, for example. Grrrr...

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.9

Still fiddling with the hardware, still not particularly satisfied with it. May have to go back to the previous arrangement.

1 month, 4 weeks ago

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O breath not, etc.
-Moore's Melodies.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.15

2 months ago

A Tale of the Late Bugaboo and Kickapoo Campaign

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Bloody French to start the story...
Pleurez, pleurez, mes yeux, et fondez vous en eau!
La moitie de ma vie a mis l'autre au tombeau.
-Corneille.

The picture used is of General Winfield Scott.

And yet another story from Poe using a now strictly verbotten word, towards the end of the story, forcing this to be a bitchute exclusive that cannot be mirrored anywhere else.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.16

2 months ago

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You will definitely want to follow along the written text for this one - the Irish brogue is not of my own contrivance, the text has the accent phonetically written into it! Unfortunately, even I couldn't always figure out exactly what the text was trying to say (e.g. "fait"? "purraty"? both used several times, I have no idea what they would be if written in normal English, a couple others besides), so oh well, I tried.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.8

2 months ago

Considered As One Of The Exact Sciences.

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Obviously this word meant something very different in the mid-19th century than what it does today, at least in US parlance... Fortunately, this story is entirely about explaining the meaning of the word in Poe's age.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.10

I got some new recording hardware. Not entirely happy with the sound quality of it in this recording. Will fiddle with the settings some and see how it goes. It is, at the very least, a great deal easier to record with this set-up, however, so I want to make it work if at all possible. Indeed, it is so much easier that I may well be reading a bit too fast. Will need to be more conscious of that going forward.

2 months ago

An Extravaganza.

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The accent of the angel is written into the text itself.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.11

2 months ago

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This story is a weird mix of failure of imagination (still using balloons to travel a thousand years into the future), of very insightful imagination, and knowledge of science and arts that feels surprising for his having written this in 1850.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.12

2 months ago

Truth is stranger than fiction. -Old Saying

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The picture used is of Ida Rubinstein as Zobeide in the 1910 Ballets Russes production Scheherazade.

For this one you definitely should follow along the text, as there are many footnotes explaining many details of the things seen and described by Sinbad: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/25525/25525-h/25525-h.htm#chap2.2

2 months ago

And stepped at once into a cooler clime.
-Copwer.

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I swear this story was written for the sole purpose of Poe showing off that he knew French! But unfortunately, I do not. So the unusually large number of French sentences made this one torture to record, and I am sure it will be torture to listen to. (Not quite 9 minutes of finished product took over 36 minutes of recording, that's how much I struggled with the French, and for such a poor result...) Sorry y'all, that's the way to cookie crumbles.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.13

2 months, 1 week ago

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The picture used is "Well, then, Bobby, my boy" by Herbert N. Rudeen, as an illustration for the work "Journeys Through Bookland, volume six" by Charles H. Sylvester, 1922.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2149/2149-h/2149-h.htm#chap3.33

2 months, 1 week ago

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The picture used is "Covered bridge, Dummerston Vermont, with fall foliage, 2009. Known as the West Dummerston Bridge, it is the longest covered bridge in Vermont. It was completely rebuilt in 1998. A state Historic Site." by chensiyuan, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.6

This story uses several words that are no longer acceptable in polite 21st century society, but which I leave in as used in the original text. Mind you, the meaning and usage of those words in the 19th century was very different from how we use and understand them today, which is why I have no problem leaving them in.

While I never learned Spanish, growing up in New Jersey there was plenty of it to be heard. While I can't claim to have done a particularly good job with the opening of this one, I would like to think I did better with it than I have with any of the French that Poe likes to use in so many other stories...

And then there's that one "Muslim" phrase, I don't even know what language that was - Arabic? Persian? Kurdish? No clue, so no way to get any insight into the pronunciation. Google translate was confused by it, so I had to go with a best guess.

2 months, 1 week ago

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The Homo-Camelopard

Chacun a ses vertus
-Crébillon's-Xerxes

The picture used is "Old male giraffe; Kariega Game Reserve, Eastern Cape, May 2016" by Goggins World, licensed for reuse under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic Creative Commons license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap06

2 months, 1 week ago

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The picture used is of the mummy of Artemidora.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.10

2 months, 1 week ago

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-all people went
Upon their ten toes in wild wonderment.
-Bishop Hall's Satires

The picture used is "Cyrano de Bergerac in Pencil" By DarthxErik, licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.2

2 months, 2 weeks ago

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To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.3

'Sx hx, Jxhn! hxw nxw? Txld yxu sx, yxu knxw. Dxn’t crxw, anxther time, befxre yxu’re xut xf the wxxds! Dxes yxur mxther knxw yxu’re xut? Xh, nx, nx!—sx gx hxme at xnce, nxw, Jxhn, tx yxur xdixus xld wxxds xf Cxncxrd! Gx hxme tx yxur wxxds, xld xwl,—gx! Yxu wxn’t? Xh, pxh, pxh, Jxhn, dxn’t dx sx! Yxu’ve gxt tx gx, yxu knxw, sx gx at xnce, and dxn’t gx slxw; fxr nxbxdy xwns yxu here, yxu knxw. Xh, Jxhn, Jxhn, Jxhn, if yxu dxn’t gx yxu’re nx hxmx—nx! Yxu’re xnly a fxwl, an xwl; a cxw, a sxw; a dxll, a pxll; a pxxr xld gxxd-fxr-nxthing-tx-nxbxdy, lxg, dxg, hxg, xr frxg, cxme xut xf a Cxncxrd bxg. Cxxl, nxw—cxxl! Dx be cxxl, yxu fxxl! Nxne xf yxur crxwing, xld cxck! Dxn’t frxwn sx—dxn’t! Dxn’t hxllx, nxr hxwl, nxr grxwl, nxr bxw-wxw-wxw! Gxxd Lxrd, Jxhn, hxw yxu dx lxxk! Txld yxu sx, yxu knxw,—but stxp rxlling yxur gxxse xf an xld pxll abxut sx, and gx and drxwn yxur sxrrxws in a bxwl!'

2 months, 2 weeks ago

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Method is the soul of business.
-Old Saying.

The picture used is "The Organ Grinder", signed and dated 'G.H.Story '77'. Oil on board, 59.8 x 40 cm. Provenance: The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.17

nem.con. = nemine contradicente = without dissent

2 months, 2 weeks ago

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Intensos rigidarn in frontern ascendere canos
Passus erat-
-Lucan-De Catone

-a bristly bore.
-Translation

Well now, the difficulty I had in pronouncing many of the Hebrew words and names in this brief story exposes the fact that I have never in my life taken a Bible study class... Sorry if I got most of it wrong, Hebrew can be a challenge for the uninitiated.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.2

If you are interested in the Roman siege of Jerusalem in 70 AD, check out this excellent series on the topic:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hen0wmoj5RU&list=PLkOo_Hy3liEL-DFpCESTbk_fC2RVUFU5o

Plus a new video (Dec 17, 2020) about the city of Jerusalem of this time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0v0p6UwRAo

2 months, 2 weeks ago

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A pendant to "The Domain of Arnheim"

A lot of French and/or Italian words scattered throughout this one that I have no idea how well I did with them, but there is one entire French sentence there in the middle that I'm sure is awful: "etait d'une architecture inconnue dans les annales de la terre"

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.18

2 months, 2 weeks ago

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The garden like a lady fair was cut,
That lay as if she slumbered in delight,
And to the open skies her eyes did shut.
The azure fields of Heaven were ‘sembled right
In a large round, set with the flowers of light.
The flowers de luce, and the round sparks of dew.
That hung upon their azure leaves did shew
Like twinkling stars that sparkle in the evening blue.

-Giles Fletcher.

1 furlong = 1/8 of a mile, or 220 yards (200 meters).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.17

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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The picture used is a photograph taken by Didier Descouens of an acherontia lachesis - dorsal side, from the collection of the mathematician Laurent Schwartz, as part of the Muséum de Toulouse collection, and licensed for reused under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2151/2151-h/2151-h.htm#chap5.3

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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Written in 1850. The California Gold Rush started in 1848, and peaked in 1849 (hence the NFL team: the San Francisco 49ers).

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/25525/25525-h/25525-h.htm#chap2.4

I was pretty tired when I recorded this, so I reverted to my natural fast speaking tempo. Yet somehow I feel that isn't entirely inappropriate for this story, since it is written to feel like a sort of hurried press release.

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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'Ευδουσιυ ρορεων κοδ'υφαι τε και φαραγγες Πρωνες τε και χαραδραι.
-Alcman.

"The mountain pinnacles slumber; valleys, crags, and caves are silent."

The picture used is an illustration by Harry Clarke for a 1909 publication "Tales of Mystery and Imagination"

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/10031/10031-h/10031-h.htm#section7f

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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Yea! Though I walk through the valley of the Shadow.
-Psalm of David

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.23

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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Πυρ σοι προσοισω

I will bring fire to thee.
-Euripides-Androm.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2150/2150-h/2150-h.htm#chap4.22

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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Μελλοντα ταυτα
-Sophocles - Antig.

"These things are in the near future."

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/10031/10031-h/10031-h.htm#section7c

The French sentence there in the middle, in case you can't understand my failed attempt at it: "Tout notre raisonnement se réduit à céder au sentiment."

The picture is by Harry Clarke from "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" by Edgar Allan Poe, 1923.

2 months, 3 weeks ago

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To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap11

The picture used is an ilustration for Poe's The Oval Portrait in "Tales and poems - vol.2" (Philadelphia: G. Barrie, 18??) on the page to face p. 87

2 months, 4 weeks ago

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Nullus enim locus sine genio est.
-Servius

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/25525/25525-h/25525-h.htm#chap2.13

I never learned a lick of French, so my pronuciation is an abomination. And of course, Poe had to go for several French phrases and sentences in this one. Bastard... I spent an absurd amount of time listening to google and bing translation tools to try to figure it out, but French is just beyond my ken. Finally I had to throw up my hands and move on, so you get some vaguely mumbled garbage instead.

Here are the full setences in written form for you, the first one there at the beginning: "la musique est le seul des talents qui jouissent de lui-même; tous les autres veulent des témoins." And then the one in the middle of the text: "la solitude est une belle chose; mais il faut quelqu'un pour vous dire que la solitude est une belle chose?"

As to the picture used: This engraving appeared at the front of the issue containing Poe's tale "The Island of the Fay" (Graham’s Magazine, June 1841). The caption reads: "The Island of the Fay," with a subnote: "Engraved for Graham's Magazine from an Original by Martin." The mezzotint engraving was made by John Sartain. It is an adaptation of "Landscape with Pan and Syrinx," a painting by John Martin (1789-1854).

2 months, 4 weeks ago

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A tale containing an allegory

The gods do bear and well allow in kings
The things which they abhor in rascal routes.
-Buckhurst's Tragedy of Ferrex and Porrex. [II. 1.].

To follow along: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2149/2149-h/2149-h.htm#chap3.32

And you might want to have a dictionary handy as well - this story is chock full of words that were certainly new to me!

For reference, King Richard III reigned from 1452 to 1485.

3 months ago

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Sub conservatione formae specificae salva anima.
-Raymond Lully.

This picture used is one of Byam Shaw's illustration for Poe's Eleonora in "Selected Tales of Mystery" (London : Sidgwick & Jackson, 1909) on the page to face p. 140 with caption "A magic prison-house of grandeurand of glory"

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.22

3 months ago

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The picture used is an illustration of The Victoria that accompanied the news article.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2147/2147-h/2147-h.htm#chap09

This story requires some context to fully appreciate. But first: the rather odd expression "dram of Geneva" is a colorful phrase for gin.

This was written in 1844; recall that the Wright Brothers would not conduct their first flight until 1903, dirigibles did not come along until 1900, and the semi-rigid airships in 1907. A steam-powered airship did first fly in 1852, but a trans-Atlantic balloon flight would not happen until 1919.

For the rest, I'll just quote from wikipedia:

Poe may have been inspired, at least in part, by a prior journalistic hoax known as the "Great Moon Hoax", published in the same newspaper in 1835. One of the suspected writers of that hoax, Richard Adams Locke, was Poe's editor at the time "The Balloon-Hoax" was published. Poe had complained for a decade that the paper's Great Moon Hoax had plagiarized (by way of Locke) the basic idea from "The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall", one of Poe's less successful stories which also involved similar inhabitants on the Moon. Poe felt The Sun had made tremendous profits from his story without giving him a cent. (Poe's anger at The Sun is chronicled in the 2008 book The Sun and the Moon by Matthew Goodman.)

3 months ago

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Happy Halloween! MUAHAHAHAHA!!!

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2149/2149-h/2149-h.htm#chap3.29

3 months, 3 weeks ago

Here we are. "Once Upon a Midnight Dreary". Join me in celebrating my 10th Episode as I close out my October festivities with a reading of Edgar Allan Poe's most famous poem, "The Raven". I hope you've enjoyed my episodes throughout the month, and if you haven't yet, watch my Halloween 2020 Playlist to catch up on any videos you've missed. Enjoy your Mischief Night and HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

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3 months, 3 weeks ago

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More Halloween fun! Horrifying story 2 of 3.

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.7

3 months, 4 weeks ago

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Time for some Halloween fun! Creepy story 1 of 3. Enjoy :)

To follow along: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2148/2148-h/2148-h.htm#chap2.6

3 months, 4 weeks ago

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The book I was reading from did not include a preface or concluding notes, but the Gutenberg website I have been referencing in the description here does. This is the concluding note included on the Gutenberg site.

The picture used is a photograph of Poe taken in June of 1849, a daguerreotype given to Poe's friend Mrs. Annie L. Richmond.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/51060/51060-h/51060-h.htm#note

4 months ago

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The book I was reading from did not include a preface or concluding note, but the Gutenberg website I have been referencing in the description here does. This is the preface included on the Gutenberg site.

----
The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket.

Comprising The Details Of A Mutiny And Atrocious Butchery On Board The American Brig Grampus, On Her Way To The South Seas, In The Month Of June, 1827.

With An Account Of The Recapture Of The Vessel By The Survivers; Their Shipwreck And Subsequent Horrible Sufferings From Famine; Their Deliverance By Means Of The British Schooner Jane Guy; The Brief Cruise Of This Latter Vessel In The Antarctic Ocean; Her Capture, And The Massacre Of Her Crew Among A Group Of Islands In The Eighty-Fourth Parallel Of Southern Latitude;

Together With The Incredible Adventures And Discoveries Still Farther South To Which That Distressing Calamity Gave Rise.

New-York: Harper & Brothers, 82 Cliff-St. 1838.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1838, by HARPER & BROTHERS, in the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/51060/51060-h/51060-h.htm#preface

4 months ago