#loghome

my neighbor was trying out his drone, and I suggested maybe test it on my home. Here it is!

4 months ago

I talk about how I'm making my door frames from a tree I cut down and milled. They are 4x16 pieces lag screwed together and then screwed into the logs of my cabin. I believe the finished frames weigh about 500 lbs.

7 months ago

I discovered that my state says the roof must be insulated to R30 (I thought it was R40). This info changes my plans- I no longer need to shave these panels flat because I no longer have to get 9" of foam in place- I only need 7 or 8 inches- this gives me more vertical space between the foam and the plywood. It also means the thickness/height of the foam can vary more, so I don't need to worry about the foam being perfectly flat.

But I also need to fit a 48" wide panel in a 46.5" space (sleepers/ribs must be 48" on center to allow the plywood to attach). So I turned my foam cutter sideways.

https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/2019/02/27/roof-part-2-insulation-and-other-materials/

2 years ago

Answers the problem not being able to measure how far to cut the roof decking while up on the roof. This would be easier with a man-lift, but with just one person and no man-lift, it becomes dangerous to try to lean out over the edge and measure how far the rafter is from the edge. Roof decking is now trimmed.

Blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

2 years ago

pounding in rebar pins to the Ridge Pole of my log home. The rafters are pine, and the ridge pole is Sweet Gum, and the Gum is very, very hard. Blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

2 years, 2 months ago