#rodserling

I got kinda tired of the the old intro and it was not really a good intro to begin with. So, It was about time I create a proper one and showcase my overall concept and aesthetic to newcomers and new subsrcribers who visit the channel for the first time. I hope I done well, but in my honest opinion, I've done a pretty decent job for almost a 2 minute and a half introductory video. WELCOME TO THE 5th DIMENSION LADIES AND GENTLEMEN AND ENJOY MY CONTENT!

4 months, 3 weeks ago

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, I PRESENT YOU THE LARGER THAN LIFE, MR. BUSTER KEATON HIMSELF!
A GIANT, A LEGEND, AN ICON IN THE HISTORY OF CINEMA, AND A SIMPLE MAN ABOVE ALL.
I LOVE BUSTER! HE IS, HE WAS FANTASTIC!

This episode is one of the few to be like a silent film, up to the time change.

"Mr. Mulligan, a rather dour critic of his times, is shortly to discover the import of that old phrase, 'Out of the frying pan, into the fire' - said fire burning brightly at all times - in The Twilight Zone. "

Episode Summary
Woodrow Mulligan (Buster Keaton) is a grumpy janitor in 1890, dissatisfied with his time and place; a backwater town called Harmony with 17-cent cuts of meat, $2 hats, livestock freely roaming the streets, and penny-farthing bicycles that knock him down while going the speed limit (eight miles per hour).

He works for Professor Gilbert, who has just invented a time helmet. Pouncing on the opportunity, Mulligan uses the helmet to transport himself to 1960, which of course turns out to be a surprise with even higher prices and more noise. He meets Rollo (Stanley Adams), a scientist and authority on the 1890s, which he regards as "charming."

Rollo tries to go back alone, but Mulligan jumps on him and they go back together. The 1890s turn out to be not entirely what Rollo thought of them. Mulligan, however, is relieved, and when he hears Rollo griping ("This guy sounds worse than my mother-in-law," Mulligan observes through an intertitle), he sets the helmet for 1960, puts it on Rollo's head and sends him back to his own time.

Closing Narration
"To each his own' - so goes another old phrase to which Mr. Woodrow Mulligan would heartily subscribe, for he has learned - definitely the hard way - that there's much wisdom in a third old phrase, which goes as follows: 'Stay in your own backyard.' To which it might be added, 'and, if possible, assist others to stay in their's' - via, of course, The Twilight Zone."

Air Date: December 15, 1961

5 months ago

Unaltered introduction.
Mike Ferris finds himself alone in the small Oakwood town and without recollection about his name, where he is or who he is. Mike wanders through the town trying to find a living soul. The tension increases and Mike has a breakdown.

6 months, 3 weeks ago

the madman talks about the Best and Worst Twilight Zone Episodes...

7 months ago

"Librarian Romney Wordsworth is judged obsolete and sentenced to death by a Chancellor of a fascist State of the future that has banned all books and religion. He is granted three requests: that only his assassin know the method of his death, that he die at midnight the next day, and that he have a live TV audience. Forty-five minutes before he is to die, Wordsworth invites the Chancellor to his room. But he has more on his mind than a deathbed chat—he's determined to put both their ideologies to the test, and demonstrate just which man really is obsolete...in this world, and in the Twilight Zone."

Opening Narration
"You walk into this room at your own risk, because it leads to the future, not a future that will be but one that might be. This is not a new world, it is simply an extension of what began in the old one. It has patterned itself after every dictator who has ever planted the ripping imprint of a boot on the pages of history since the beginning of time. It has refinements, technological advances, and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of human freedom. But like every one of the super states that preceded it, it has one iron rule: logic is an enemy and truth is a menace. This is Mr. Romney Wordsworth, in his last forty-eight hours on Earth. He's a citizen of the State but will soon have to be eliminated, because he is built out of flesh and because he has a mind. Mr. Romney Wordsworth, who will draw his last breaths in the Twilight Zone. "

Episode Summary
In a totalitarian society, Romney Wordsworth is condemned to death for the crime of being a librarian, and he is subjected to the harangues of the state's Chancellor and his lectures about Wordsworth's obsolescence (he is also rebuked over his belief in God, whom the state declares does not exist). Wordsworth, however, makes one final request - that he be allowed to choose his method of execution and that it be televised live to the society. A television camera is installed in Wordsworth's study to broadcast his final hours and execution live to the nation. He summons the Chancellor, who arrives at exactly 11:16 p.m. After some discussion, Wordsworth reveals to the Chancellor that his chosen method of execution is by a bomb set to go off in his room at midnight. He explains that the reaction to imminent execution that will interest the public is not his own but the Chancellor's, as the door is locked and there is no one outside to help the Chancellor escape. He intends to show the nation how a spiritual man faces death, and proceeds to read from his illegal, long-hidden copy of the Bible (in particular, Psalm 23). He also points out that, as the events are being broadcast live, the State would risk losing its status in the eyes of the people by trying to rescue the Chancellor. As the time draws to a close, Wordsworth's calm acceptance of death stands in sharp contrast with the Chancellor's increasing panic. Moments before the bomb explodes, the Chancellor desperately begs to be let go "in the name of God". Wordsworth says that "in the name of God" he will release the Chancellor immediately, which he does. The Chancellor bursts out of the room and down the stairs just as the bomb explodes and kills Wordsworth, who in his last seconds of life, stands tall and has a facial expression of peace and satisfaction. In the final scene, the Chancellor returns to the courtroom to discover that his own subaltern has replaced him and that he himself is now obsolete: "You have disgraced the State. You have proven yourself a coward. You have, therefore, no function." Immediately convicted, the former Chancellor screams as the crowd in the courtroom apprehends him. He continues to plead with the court, insisting that he is in fact not obsolete and wishes only to serve the State, but is dragged away.

Trivia
Often thought of as one of the finest episodes.
Both the Chancellor and Romney Wordsworth's actors appeared in more than one other episode.
According to the Star Trek wiki, an unnamed actor in this episode also played Bobby in several episodes of Star Trek. For an unusual reason, Rod Serling, the creator, appeared in the closing narration. This would happen again in the season three episode, “The Fugitive.”

1 year, 1 month ago

I HAVE WATCHED THIS EPISODE AT LEAST 40 TIMES ALREADY AND IT NEVER GETS OLD. THIS IS THE FINEST EPISODE EVER MADE AND AIRED ON THE TWILIGHT ZONE. PERIOD!!
WATCH. ENJOY. WATCH AGAIN. COME BACK AND SEE YOU IN THE TWILIGHT ZONE!

"Wintery February night, the present. Order of events: a phone call from a frightened woman notating the arrival of an unidentified flying object, and the check-out you've just witnessed with two state troopers verifying the event, but with nothing more enlightning to add beyond evidence of some tracks leading across the highway to a diner. You've heard of trying to find a needle in a haystack? Well, stay with us now and you'll be a part of an investigating team whose mission is not to find that proverbial needle, no, their task is even harder. They've got to find a Martian in a diner, and in just a moment you'll search with them, because you've just landed in the Twilight Zone."

Episode Summary
During a snowstorm, two state troopers are investigating a crash after a woman telephoned them and are led to believe that it was a flying saucer. They follow footprints leading from the crash site to a diner, where a group of passengers from a bus to Boston are waiting for word that a bridge up ahead is safe to cross. Though the only patrons of the roadside eatery are bus passengers, there is one more person than there were people on the bus. Mr. Ross, a skeptical businessman (John Hoyt), who says he has a meeting in Boston, says the driver must have been mistaken, but he swears there were six. There is mutual suspicion among the stranded travelers, as the passengers try to guess which among them is the alien. It is suggested that the two married couples are paired off. An old man laughs at this, saying it sounds like science fiction. In the meantime, several odd things are happening. The jukebox plays on its own, the lights flicker on and off, and sugar bowls explode on the tables. When they receive word that the bridge is safe to cross, they all leave the diner. Shortly, Mr. Ross returns to the diner alone and tells the cook that the bridge wasn't safe at all and that it collapsed, killing all the occupants of both the bus and the police car. The cook asks the businessman how he survived without even getting wet. The businessman asks what the word "wet" means, revealing a third arm from under his overcoat as he stirs his coffee and lights a cigarette. He says the music and telephone ringing were all illusions. He reveals to the cook that he is a Martian, that Mars plans to start a colony on Earth. Laughing, the cook tells him that he's too late, that he himself is from Venus, which has already started a colony, and that the Martian invasion force has been intercepted. The cook takes off his cap, revealing a third eye in the middle of his forehead. The shocked Martian stares nervously at the cook, and the episode ends.

Trivia
The episode is unique, as an actual Twilight Zone contributor is mentioned. As the patrons realize that an alien is amongst the group, Jack Elam's character laughs and says, "She's just like science fiction, that what she is. A regular Ray Bradbury." One of Bradbury's stories became a Twilight Zone episode during the third season ("I Sing the Body Electric").

In one of the few times Serling accommodated his sponsor during an episode, "Ross" takes out a pack of cigarettes and lights and smokes one using three hands. The cigarettes were "Oasis" menthol, the brand that Liggett & Myers was advertising on the program at the time. During the 1950s and 60s, advertisers sometimes subtly "placed" products into the shows they sponsored.

The name on the side of the bus is "Cayuga" which is the name of the production company for the Twilight Zone.
On the "2112 / Moving Pictures" episode of the television series Classic Albums, Rush drummer/lyricist Neil Peart commented on the writing of the song "The Twilight Zone," featured on 2112. The two verses refer to "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?" and "Stopover in a Quiet Town."

1 year, 2 months ago

"This is Gart Williams, age thirty-eight, a man protected by a suit of armor, all held together by one bolt. Just a moment ago, someone removed the bolt, and Mr. Williams' protection fell away from him and left him a naked target. He's been cannonaded this afternoon by all the enemies of his life. His insecurity has shelled him, his sensitivity has straddled him with humiliation, his deep-rooted disquiet about his own worth has zeroed in on him, landed on target, and blown him apart. Mr. Gart Williams, ad agency exec, who, in just a moment, will move into the Twilight Zone - in a desperate search for survival."

Episode Summary
Gart Williams is a New York advertising executive who has grown exasperated with his career. His overbearing boss, Oliver Misrell, angered by the loss of a major account, lectures him about this "push-push-push" business. Unable to sleep properly at home, he drifts off for a short nap on the train during his daily commute through the November snow. He wakes to find the train stopped and his car now a 19th century railway car, deserted except for himself. The sun is bright outside, and as he looks out the window, he discovers that the train is in a town called Willoughby, and that it's July 1888. He learns that this is a "peaceful, restful place, where a man can slow down to a walk and live his life full measure." Being jerked back awake into the real world, he asks the conductor if he has ever heard of Willoughby, but the conductor replies, "Not on this run...no Willoughby on the line." That night, he has another argument with his shrewish wife, Jane. Selfish, cold and uncaring, she makes him see that he is only a money machine to her. He tells her about his dream and about Willoughby, only to have her ridicule him as being "born too late," declaring it her "miserable tragic error" to have married a man "whose big dream in life is to be Huckleberry Finn." The next week, Williams again dozes off on the train and returns to Willoughby where everything is the same as before. As he is about to get off the train carrying his briefcase, the train begins to roll, returning him to the present. Williams promises himself to get off at Willoughby next time. Experiencing a breakdown at work, he calls his wife, who abandons him in his time of need. On his way home, once again he falls asleep to find himself in Willoughby. This time, as the conductor warmly beckons him to the door, Williams intentionally leaves his briefcase on the train. Getting off the train, he is greeted by name by various inhabitants who welcome him while he tells them he's glad to be there and plans to stay and join their idyllic life. The swinging pendulum of the station clock fades into the swinging lantern of a train engineer, standing over Williams' body. The modern-day conductor explains that Williams "shouted something about Willoughby", just before jumping off the train, and was killed instantly. Williams' body is loaded into a hearse. The back door of the hearse closes to reveal the name of the funeral home: Willoughby & Son Funeral Home.

Themes
This one delves more into the superficiality of people and how sometimes a person wants to get away from it all to a simpler, less materialistic, self-centered time. It also talks about paradise and leaves the viewer wondering if Willoughby was heaven or just his imagination.

1 year, 2 months ago

This is one of several episodes from season one with its opening title sequence plastered over with the opening for season two. This was done during the Summer of 1961 as to help the season one shows fit in with the new look the show had taken during the following season. As always, a very, very special and fantastic episode. It's the bee's nees man! I hope you enjoy it (I know you will).

Opening Narration
"Millicent Barnes, age twenty-five, young woman waiting for a bus on a rainy November night. Not a very imaginative type is Miss Barnes, not given to undue anxiety or fears, or, for that matter, even the most temporal flights of fancy. Like most career women, she has a generic classification as a, quote, girl with a head on her shoulders, end of quote. All of which is mentioned now because, in just a moment, the head on Miss Barnes' shoulders will be put to a test. Circumstances will assault her sense of reality and a chain of nightmares will put her sanity on a block. Millicent Barnes, who, in one minute, will wonder if she's going mad."

Episode Summary
A young woman named Millicent Barnes is waiting in a bus depot in Ithaca, New York, for a bus to Cortland, en route to a new job. Upon looking at a wall clock she notices the bus is late. She walks up to the ticket counter to ask the ticket agent when the bus will arrive, and he gruffly replies that this is her third time there. Millicent denies this. While speaking with the ticket agent, she notices a bag just like hers in the luggage pile behind her. She mentions this to the ticket agent, who says it's her bag. She doesn't believe this until she notices her bag is not beside the bench anymore. Later she goes into the restroom to wash her hands and the cleaning lady there insists this is her second time there. Again, Millicent denies this. Upon leaving the restroom, she glances in the mirror and sees, in addition to her reflection, an exact copy of herself sitting on the bench outside. A few moments later she meets a young man from Binghamton named Paul Grinstead, who is waiting for the same bus. Millicent tells Paul about encountering her double. Paul, attempting to calm Millicent, says it is either a joke or a misunderstanding caused by a look-alike. When the bus arrives and the two of them prepare to board it, Millicent looks in the window and sees the copy of herself, seated already upon the bus. In shock, she runs back into the depot and faints. Millicent lies unconscious on a bench inside the depot while Paul and the cleaning lady attend to her. Paul agrees to wait for the 7:00 bus. While they wait, Millicent, now coming to, insists the strange events are caused by an evil double from a parallel world - a nearby, yet distant alternate plane of existence that comes into convergence with this world by powerful forces, or unnatural, unknown events. When this happens, the malevolent impostors enter this realm. Millicent's doppelgänger, evil in nature, can survive in this world only by eliminating and replacing its good counterpart - Millicent herself. Paul says the explanation is "a little metaphysical" for him, and believes that Millicent's sanity is beginning to unravel. Paul tells Millicent he'll call a friend in Tully who has a car and may be able to drive them to Syracuse. In reality, he calls the police. After Millicent is taken away by two policemen, Paul begins to settle himself. After drinking from a water fountain, Paul notices that his valise is missing. Looking up towards the doors, Paul notices another man running out the door of the bus depot. Pursuing this individual down the street, Paul discovers that he is chasing his own copy, its face a mask of excited, evil delight.

In a short film pitching the Twilight Zone series to a Dutch television station, creator Rod Serling claimed to have gotten the idea for "Mirror Image" following an encounter at an airport. Serling noticed a man at the other side of the terminal who wore the same clothes and carried the same suitcase as himself; Serling considered what would happen if the man turned around and was revealed to be a duplicate of himself. However, the man turned out to be younger and "more attractive".
In the original story, " The Mirror Image", the washroom attendant was actually a woman working at the lunch counter.

1 year, 3 months ago

This week's episode is very dear to my heart and it's called "Walking Distance".

HIGHLY, HIGHLY, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
I CANNOT EMPHASIZE ENOUGH HOW HIGHLY I AM RECOMMENDING THIS ONE.

"Advertising executive Martin Sloan (Gig Young), age thirty-six, is exhausted by the hectic pace of life in New York City. One day, while in an especially disgruntled mood, Martin goes for a drive in the country and winds up not far from his old home town. He stops, leaves his car at a gas station and sets off on foot to the town. Mysteriously, he arrives to find things exactly as they were when he was a child. Then reality sets in. His short walk has taken him a long, long way...much farther than he thought...all the way to The Twilight Zone."

Episode Summary
A middle-aged man, Martin Sloan, is driving cross-country when he stops his car. He walks toward his hometown, which appears exactly as it was when he was a boy. He goes into a drugstore and has an ice cream soda while recalling his memories from the past. He says, "One of the greatest memories I have is Old Man Wilson, may God rest his soul, sleeping in his comfortable chair just like he did before he died." The cashier looks shocked but doesn't say anything and as Martin leaves the store, the cashier goes up to a room where Mr. Wilson is sleeping and says "We'll need more chocolate syrup, Mr. Wilson." He responds by saying "I'll order some more of it this afternoon."

"For Rod Serling, "Walking Distance" had an intensely personal meaning. He conceived the plot when he was out walking on an MGM set and became overwhelmed with nostalgia when he realized its similarity to the town of Binghamton, New York, where he grew up during the 1930s. It suddenly struck him that all of us have a deep longing to go back -not to our home as it is today, but as we remember it."

Similar themes are explored in "The Incredible World of Horace Ford" and, to a lesser extent, "Young Man's Fancy." The episode also deals with the relentless pressures of the business world, which also serve as the basis for "A Stop at Willoughby," "The Brain Center at Whipple's," and two Serling teleplays from before and after The Twilight Zone: "Patterns" and the Night Gallery episode "They're Tearing Down Tim Riley's Bar."

1 year, 3 months ago

An edgy, girtty and a misterious tale of a man who's desperation rules over his entire existence and where hopes, dreams and failures are resting only in the bottom of the bottle. Highly recommended without any single doubt. Enjoy it folks!

"Town drunk Al Denton (Dan Duryea), once a feared gunslinger but now an object of pity and scorn is forced to draw against a sadistic bully (Martin Landau). A glance from mysterious peddler Mr. Fate (Malcolm Atterbury) allows Denton to get off two miraculous shots, saving his life. Now a town hero, Denton regains his self-respect and swears off liquor. But soon, the routine that drove him to the bottle in the first place begins again -Denton is challenged to a shootout by a young hotshot (Doug McClure). Practicing, Denton finds his ability with a gun is long gone, In desperation, he turns to Fate for more magic. What Fate provides might just save Debton from a bullet...or it might do much, much more."

Episode Summary
Al Denton was once known as the quickest draw in town, but his life was ruined after he killed a teenaged boy in a duel — he is now an alcoholic wreck and the laughing stock of the community. A mysterious salesman named Henry J. Fate ostensibly further dooms Denton by causing him to inexplicably regain his expert shooting touch and once again inspire the respect and awe of the townsfolk, which Denton explains will only cause reputation-hungry gunslingers from miles around to seek him out and, inevitably, kill him. Just as Denton predicted, soon enough a challenge is delivered which Denton dare not refuse.

The still-weary and not-so-sure-handed Denton practices in the desert for his suicidal duel, but he misses his targets miserably and concludes that he must skip town. As he quietly packs his things and tries to flee under the cover of night, he strikes up a conversation with Fate, who seems to know things about Denton and offers him a way out. Fate claims to possess a potion guaranteed to make the drinker the fastest gun in the West for exactly ten seconds. Denton is skeptical but Fate goads him into drinking a free sample, after which Denton immediately realizes its benefits.

Still, Denton knows that with Fate's magical potion he has extended his lease on life by only one gunfight; there will be no end to the challenges he will surely continue to receive.

Themes
This episode dealt primarily with themes of Fate and Redemption of all kinds - from the physical, external redemption of Denton in town, to the internal redemption of Denton overcoming his alcoholism and moving on from the gunslinging world.

Another episode with the theme of a mysterious vendor inexplicably able to provide one with what one needs most is Season 1's What You Need.

This was one of many episodes to occur in the 19th Century but one of the few to feature characters that are cowboys in the Old West, which were popular on TV at the time.

1 year, 3 months ago

If this episode doesn't make you heart ache and your whole being all emotional and touchy, then I don't know what your god damn problem is! Superb writing by Rod Serling. Amazing acting by both Ed Wynn and Murray Hamilton and an overall treat for the eyes and senses. Obviously, it goes without saying that this one is a very high on the top list of my favorite TZ episodes. I know I say that very often and in most of my uploads, but it is true. Pure gold! I hope you'll enjoy it as much as I did.

From the CBS Video Library cover:

"Lew Bookman (Ed Wynn) is an unremarkable, sixtyish salesman who works the city streets. Life passes without incident, until one July afternoon when Mr. Death informs him that he is to die at midnight. Faced with the problem of finding a replacement for his elusive subject, Death arranges for little Maggie, a neighborhood child, to die in a traffic accident. Bookman, now determined to save the girl, has no choice but to confront Mr. Death and deliver the toughest sales pitch of his career."

Opening Narration:

"Street scene: Summer. The present. Man on a sidewalk named Lew Bookman, age sixtyish. Occupation: Pitchman. Lew Bookman, a fixture of the summer, a rather minor component to a hot July; a nondescript, commonplace little man whose life is a treadmill built out of sidewalks. In just a moment, Lew Bookman will have to concern himself with survival, because as of three o'clock this hot July afternoon he'll be stalked by Mr. Death."

1 year, 3 months ago

Here's another fantastic and a truly personal favorite episode of mine from the frist season of The Twilight Zone. Burgess Meredith is absolutely mesmerizing in this role and I could watch this episode countless of times. It has all those subtle and unique moments that makes it so interesting and enjoybale to watch. The acting of Vaughn Taylor is absolutely stellar as well. The moral in this episode I think is that, even if we have all the time in the world we still need to socialize with other people and share our experience and learned knowledge. Above all, what are books for if not to share the wisdom contain inside them and give that spark of "light" to the next individual. Enjoy folks!

From the CBS Video Library cover:

"Henry Bemis, a bookish little man with thick horn-rimmed glasses wants only one thing out of life; the time to read. Reading is his only passion in an otherwise mundane existence...yet, it's almost an impossibility due to a shrewish wife who deems reading silly...a boss at the bank who's interested in efficiency not education...and the unrelenting hands of the clock. Now all that is about to change. As he does everyday, Bemis sneaks down to the vault to read during his lunch hour, but today when he emerges from his private sanctuary, he will enter a new world. A world that might or might not fulfill his life-long dream."

Episode Summary

Mild-mannered and myopic, bank teller Henry Bemis loves to read, but neither his shrewish wife nor efficiency-minded boss give him much chance. Sneaking into the vault on his lunch hour to read, he is knocked unconscious by a mammoth shock wave. When he comes to, he discovers that the world has been devastated by a nuclear war and that he, having been protected by the vault, is the last man on Earth

Closing Narration

The best laid plans of mice and men and Henry Bemis, the small man in the glasses who wanted nothing but time. Henry Bemis, now just a part of a smashed landscape, just a piece of the rubble, just a fragment of what man has deeded to himself. Mr. Henry Bemis... in the Twilight Zone.

1 year, 3 months ago

THIS IS THE NORMAL 25 MINUTE VERSION OF THE PILOT EPISODE FROM SEASON 1 (1959). IT IS THE BEST (RESOLUTION WISE) VIDEO VERSION POSSIBLE I COULD FIND ONLINE. I SUPPOSE IT'S A DVD OR BLU-RAY RIP OR SOMETHING SIMILAR.
THIS ALSO HAS TO BE MY FAVOURITE TWILIGHT ZONE EPISODE OF ALL FIVE SEASONS. ENJOY!

After all these years it still carries such a profound and strong message to the viewer. It has an extremely simple and yet so powerful and solid plot and superb acting by Earl Holliman. It was written by Rod Serling and the quality is truly evident. This first episode also strikes a blazing similarity with current events and the whole media driven (mostly), dystopian, draconian and mind harvesting monster of a police state madness about this whole world wide pandemic that they want us to believe is real. So sit back, relax and enjoy this spectacular piece of cinema!

"There is a sixth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the sunlight of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area that might be called the Twilight Zone."

The place is here, the time is now, and the journey into the shadows that we're about to watch could be our journey.
The barrier of loneliness: the palpable, desperate need of the human animal to be with his fellow man. Up there, up there in the vastness of space, in the void that is sky, up there is an enemy known as isolation. It sits there in the stars waiting, waiting with the patience of eons, forever waiting... in the Twilight Zone.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

The main theme in this episode, as the title suggests, is the difference between aloneness and loneliness and its effect on humans. The commanding officer in the final scene sums this up, observing, "The barrier of loneliness — that's the one thing we haven't licked yet."

As with the subject of age, isolation would be a theme often revisited by Serling in various episodes throughout the series, most prominently Season 2's "The Mind and the Matter", in which a man finds he can eliminate outside influences and uses the power to rid himself of all humanity, only to realize the extreme loneliness that comes with deprivation of human interaction. Other notable episodes with the theme include Season 1's "The Lonely" and "Time Enough at Last", Season 3's "Nothing in the Dark", and Season 5's "A Kind of a Stopwatch".

As part of the Sci Fi Channel's participation in Cable in the Classroom, "Where is Everybody?" may be recorded and retained indefinitely for educational exhibition. A suggested lesson plan expands on the concept of aloneness vs. loneliness by shifting the focus to "using a gift for personal gain or for the benefit of others" and how students might help those who are most affected by isolation and the effects of social deprivation.

Season 5's "The Long Morrow" also features an astronaut about to embark on a long solitary expedition into space.

1 year, 4 months ago

THIS HAS TO BE MY FAVOURITE TWILIGHT ZONE EPISODE OF ALL FIVE SEASONS.

After all these years it still carries such a profound and strong message to the viewer. It has an extremely simple and yet so powerful and solid plot and superb acting by Earl Holliman. It was written by Rod Serling and the quality is truly evident. This first episode also strikes a blazing similarity with current events and the whole media driven (mostly), dystopian, draconian and mind harvesting monster of a police state madness about this whole world wide pandemic that they want us to believe is real. So sit back, relax and enjoy this spectacular piece of cinema!

"There is a sixth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the sunlight of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area that might be called the Twilight Zone."

The place is here, the time is now, and the journey into the shadows that we're about to watch could be our journey.
The barrier of loneliness: the palpable, desperate need of the human animal to be with his fellow man. Up there, up there in the vastness of space, in the void that is sky, up there is an enemy known as isolation. It sits there in the stars waiting, waiting with the patience of eons, forever waiting... in the Twilight Zone.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

The main theme in this episode, as the title suggests, is the difference between aloneness and loneliness and its effect on humans. The commanding officer in the final scene sums this up, observing, "The barrier of loneliness — that's the one thing we haven't licked yet."

As with the subject of age, isolation would be a theme often revisited by Serling in various episodes throughout the series, most prominently Season 2's "The Mind and the Matter", in which a man finds he can eliminate outside influences and uses the power to rid himself of all humanity, only to realize the extreme loneliness that comes with deprivation of human interaction. Other notable episodes with the theme include Season 1's "The Lonely" and "Time Enough at Last", Season 3's "Nothing in the Dark", and Season 5's "A Kind of a Stopwatch".

As part of the Sci Fi Channel's participation in Cable in the Classroom, "Where is Everybody?" may be recorded and retained indefinitely for educational exhibition. A suggested lesson plan expands on the concept of aloneness vs. loneliness by shifting the focus to "using a gift for personal gain or for the benefit of others" and how students might help those who are most affected by isolation and the effects of social deprivation.

Season 5's "The Long Morrow" also features an astronaut about to embark on a long solitary expedition into space.

1 year, 4 months ago

COMPARE THE CURRENT SITUATION OF THE SO CALLED "CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK" WITH THIS EPISODE OF THE TWILIGHT ZONE AND IT ALL STARTS TO MAKE SENSE! DOESN'T IT?

Let's face it. We live in a command-based system, where we have been programmed since our earliest school years to become followers, not individuals. We have been conditioned to embrace teams, the herd, the masses, popular opinion -- and to reject what is different, eccentric or stands alone. We are so programmed that all it takes for any business or authority to condition our minds to follow or buy something is to simply repeat a statement more than three or four times until we repeat it ourselves and follow it as truth or the best trendiest thing. This is called "programming" -- the frequent repetition of words to condition us how to think, what to like or dislike, and who to follow.

P.S.
Look, I'm not sayin' the danger of that virus isn't REAL, or the virus itself is FAKE. I cannot know that for certain and I think no one really can. (apart from those on the very, very high ladder of the world government institutions). What I am saying is, that lots and lots of people are acting completely bonkers! This is to be expected and I don't blame everyone. People just wanna stay alive and keep themselves safe and their families and loved ones. We mustn't trust the mainstream media, newspaper, internet and news coverage, and quite frankly no one really should! I mean, why would you man? I think the most basic and logical thing we can do at this moment is to get some supplies, act normal and keep a low key, at least until things get cooled down and somewhat steady. Panicking and acting like goddamn wild animals won't get us anywhere. Stay safe y'all and hope you're doin' fine, wherever you are. in the meantime get your mind occupied with some good ol' Twilight Zone awesomeness or read a useful book. Thanks!

IMDb Info:
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0734664/?ref_=ttep_ep22

1 year, 4 months ago

A man is sent back in time to December 6, 1941 and tries to warn people about the upcoming Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
This episode was written by Rod Serling.

It is October, 1958, and "Peter Jenson" (played by William Bendix) is in the office of a New York psychiatrist named "Dr. Arnold Gillespie" (played by Martin Balsam.) Peter made the appointment since he has been suffering from the same nightmare for the last several nights. He is very anxious.

In this dream, Peter always finds himself at a hotel in Honolulu. The date is December 6th, 1941, which is the day before the Pearl Harbor attack. So, how can he warn people of the impending doom?

Dr. Gillespie listens patiently and tries to help convince Peter that it is all just a dream, regardless of how real it might feel at the time.

Together, the two men smoke a lot of cigarettes as they try to get to the bottom of what all this means... wait for the twist ending!

This was a well-done drama. Convincing characters and intriguing story. I strongly recommend it!

1 year, 5 months ago