#swim

Swim With The Tuna Port Lincoln

Swimming with tuna or in my case freediving with tuna, in large numbers is not something one gets to do every day, particularly in large numbers, so the opportunity to do this in an enclosed area whilst visiting the town of Port Lincoln on the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia was something I had to do.

There are plenty of in water attractions in Port Lincoln. One of them is appropriately called 'Swim With The Tuna' and enables you to do just that. It has been built in the same type of netted aquatic farm structures as are used throughout the Blue Fin Tuna industry in the region. It's a first rate experience, with some of the staff having significant prior experience in the Blue Fin Tuna Industry itself. It's also very reasonably priced for an adventure that lasts 3 hours. It starts with a 15 minute boat ride in a luxury catamaran out to a world class Tuna Pontoon, then put on wetsuit, mask and snorkel and in the water you go, surrounded by fish.

There are two enclosures you can swim in (one smaller one within the other) so you can experience not only the excitement of swimming amongst large blue fin tuna themselves (one of the 10 fastest species of fish in the ocean), but also a host of other aquatic life that you will find in the smaller enclosure which is equally interesting. There are also some shallow pools that you can observe and in some cases touch marine life and underwater viewing. Not content to just snorkel, I wanted a 3 dimensional experience that I could immerse myself in so as I am a qualified freediver I asked if I could freedive in the enclosures. This isn't always possible with large fins when the company has lots of customers but as there were only a handfull that day and there was plenty of room, the friendly staff obliged on this particular occasion. Whether you get to swim with the tuna on the surface or like me freedive with the tuna too, it's an exciting experience and I highly recommend it. You will also learn much about the tuna farming industry and may get to see some other aquatic life on your trip to and from the pontoon, in particular seals and whales. So for anyone passing through the area with half a day to spare, you don't need much in the way of experience, as long as you are comfortable in the water. Feel free to contact 'Swim With The Tuna' for further information.

This video was made some years ago and originally uploaded to our other channel, "Endurance Swimmer Australia" where you'll find more of our aquatic adventures.

2 months ago

Lake Bonney is a large lake located next to the town of Barmera in South Australia. It measures 6.5 km down the length at it's longest stretch and is the venue for our latest marathon swim challenge. On this occasion I swam 2 laps of the lake along that course making the swim 13 km.

I'd been wanting to do this swim for years. As a much younger person I competed here in open water swimming competitions that were much shorter in length that took part near Barmara running parallel to the shore. It was at this time that I became aware that Lake Bonney had been the site of an attempt on the world water speed record by Donald Campbell in his jet powered hydroplane, Bluebird K7 back in 1964 when he was trying to become the first person to capture both land and water speed records in the same calender year. I had quite a fascination with Campbell at the time, having watched a film about his last record attempt in 1967 that ultimately ended tragically. I worked out where the run had taken place, along the longest stretch of the lake and decided that someday I would swim two laps of the lake along this course. I wasn't aware of anyone else who had done it so it seemed like an interesting challenge worth doing.

We decided that we would camp at the northern end of the lake for Christmas of 2018 and that we would do the course back to front with the turnaround point being the Bluebird Cafe (which is an extension of the shed that Campbells boat was housed in during the 1964 attempt),

Bluebird Café
https://www.facebook.com/bluebirdonbonney

On Christmas eve we had a good weather window so shortly before 6.00 am we headed off and benefitted from flat water for most of the swim. It's worth noting that Campbell wasn't so lucky as it was the wind and water state that ultimately caused the attempt on Lake Bonney, which had yielded speeds of up to 216 mph, to eventually be called off and be moved to Lake Dumbleyung in Western Australia. It was there that on the last day of the year he recorded an average speed over two runs of 276.33 mph to set a new world record and become the first (and so far only) person to officially set both world land and water speed records in the same calender year.

Many thanks to K7 Project Bluebird for providing some stock footage to assist me in making this video.

K7 Project Bluebird
https://www.facebook.com/k7projectbluebird

This video was originally uploaded to our first channel "Endurance Swimmer Australia" where you'll find more of our earlier aquatic based activities.

2 months ago

This is the first in a new series of videos that I will produce from time to time where I subject myself to a physical challenge. Given that my background is distance open water swimming it seems fitting to start off with a a marathon swim at the picturesque 'Encounter Lakes' in South Australia.

By way of an inntroduction as to what constitutes an official 'marathon swim' these days, I have to go back to 2008 when the Olympic Games first featured a 10 km open water swim, a swimming marathon. From that date it has been considered that a marathon swim should be classified as a swim of a duration of 10 km or more (as opposed to 25 km which was the official distance prior to this). This is somewhat appropriate as the average time it takes a decent distance swimmer to do a 10 km swim is not too dissimilar to that which a decent marathon runner runs a 42 km marathon on the road. There is some parity here.

Unlike in most competitive open water events I will likely be using a full length wetsuit for all of the swimming physical challenges I do. Now I know some hard core open water swimmers out there may thumb their nose a bit at the idea of this and I must admit I came from that mould too. If you'd have asked me 10 years ago I would have been dead set against endorsing wetsuits for any type of event or recognised swim on the principal of parity, but it occurs to me that just because something can be done without and it is arguably more challenging doesn't necessarily mean it is best practice. After all, one can climb high on many mountains in shorts and a T-Shirt if you get the right weather but the folly there is pretty clear. I'm wearing it mainly for protection from the sun but acknowledge it provides some protection from other environmental issues such as the cold and stinging jellyfish. I'm planning to test a variety of suits and this will be part of the conversation moving forward. I also note on this subject that FINA has approved certain wetsuits for some events that take place in extremely cold conditions. This arguably opens up the sport to more countries and more competitors. Anyway it's a subject I'll revisit as I produce more videos on the topic.

For my first Physical Challenge video I've chosen to swim 6 laps of Encounter Lakes which is located in Encounter Bay, South Australia. That's a total distance of 10.14 km. For this challenge I'm using the very reasonably priced Orca S6 wetsuit. Stay tuned for many more marathon swimming challenges.

2 months, 2 weeks ago

Made by jahtso @Youtube
Animation created by PsychicPebbles
This show is promising. It will raise your IQ far greater than Rick and Morty.

2 months, 3 weeks ago

January 29, 2019
Jim Can't Swim JimCantSwim

8 months, 1 week ago

January 29, 2019
Jim Can't Swim JimCantSwim

8 months, 1 week ago

Lake Bonney is a large lake located next to the town of Barmera in South Australia. It measures 6.5 km down the length at it's longest stretch and is the venue for our latest marathon swim challenge. On this occasion I swam 2 laps of the lake along that course making the swim 13 km.

I'd been wanting to do this swim for years. As a much younger person I competed here in open water swimming competitions that were much shorter in length that took part near Barmara running parallel to the shore. It was at this time that I became aware that Lake Bonney had been the site of an attempt on the world water speed record by Donald Campbell in his jet powered hydroplane, Bluebird K7 back in 1964 when he was trying to become the first person to capture both land and water speed records in the same calender year. I had quite a fascination with Campbell at the time, having watched a film about his last record attempt in 1967 that ultimately ended tragically. I worked out where the run had taken place, along the longest stretch of the lake and decided that someday I would swim two laps of the lake along this course. I wasn't aware of anyone else who had done it so it seemed like an interesting challenge worth doing.

We decided that we would camp at the northern end of the lake for Christmas of 2018 and that we would do the course back to front with the turnaround point being the Bluebird Cafe (which is an extension of the shed that Campbells boat was housed in during the 1964 attempt),

On Christmas eve we had a good weather window so shortly before 6.00 am we headed off and benefitted from flat water for most of the swim. It's worth noting that Campbell wasn't so lucky as it was the wind and water state that ultimately caused the attempt on Lake Bonney, which had yielded speeds of up to 216 mph, to eventually be called off and be moved to Lake Dumbleyung in Western Australia. It was there that on the last day of the year he recorded an average speed over two runs of 276.33 mph to set a new world record and become the first (and so far only) person to officially set both world land and water speed records in the same calender year.

Many thanks to K7 Project Bluebird for providing some stock footage to assist me in making this video.

For Endurance Swimmer articles and other information go to http://www.enduranceswimmeraustralia.com

1 year, 9 months ago

For some time now I've been planning to feature videos speaking to Marathon Swimming after all the name of this channel does have 'Endurance Swimmer' in it. I've decided the best way to do this is to take part in a series of challenges where I attempt to complete an official marathon swimming distance in as many different bodies of water as possible.

Since 2008 when the Olympic Games first featured a 10 km open water swim, a swimming marathon has been considered a swim of a duration of 10 km or more (as opposed to 25 km which was the official distance prior to this). This is somewhat appropriate as the average time it takes a decent distance swimmer to do a 10 km swim is not too dissimilar to that which a decent marathon runner runs a 42 km marathon on the road. There is some parity here.

Unlike in most competitive open water events I will be using a full length wetsuit for all of them. Now I know some hard core open water swimmers out there may thumb their nose a bit at the idea of this and I must admit I came from that mould too. If you'd have asked me 10 years ago I would have been dead set against endorsing wetsuits for any type of event or recognised swim on the principal of parity, but it occurs to me that just because something can be done without and it is arguably more challenging doesn't necessarily mean it is best practice. After all, one can climb high on many mountains in shorts and a T-Shirt if you get the right weather but the folly there is pretty clear. I'm wearing it mainly for protection from the sun but acknowledge it provides some protection from other environmental issues such as the cold and stinging jellyfish. I'm planning to test a variety of suits and this will be part of the conversation moving forward. I also note on this subject that FINA has approved certain wetsuits for some events that take place in extremely cold conditions. This arguably opens up the sport to more countries and more competitors. Anyway it's a subject I'll revisit as I produce more videos on the topic.

For my first Marathon Swimming Challenge I've chosen to swim 6 laps of Encounter Lakes which is located in Encounter Bay, South Australia. That's a total distance of 10.14 km. For this challenge I'm using the very reasonably priced Orca S6 wetsuit. Stay tuned for many more marathon swimming challenges.

For Endurance Swimmer articles and other information go to http://www.enduranceswimmeraustralia.com

2 years ago