#thetwilightzone

I got kinda tired of the the old intro and it was not really a good intro to begin with. So, It was about time I create a proper one and showcase my overall concept and aesthetic to newcomers and new subsrcribers who visit the channel for the first time. I hope I done well, but in my honest opinion, I've done a pretty decent job for almost a 2 minute and a half introductory video. WELCOME TO THE 5th DIMENSION LADIES AND GENTLEMEN AND ENJOY MY CONTENT!

4 months, 2 weeks ago

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, I PRESENT YOU THE LARGER THAN LIFE, MR. BUSTER KEATON HIMSELF!
A GIANT, A LEGEND, AN ICON IN THE HISTORY OF CINEMA, AND A SIMPLE MAN ABOVE ALL.
I LOVE BUSTER! HE IS, HE WAS FANTASTIC!

This episode is one of the few to be like a silent film, up to the time change.

"Mr. Mulligan, a rather dour critic of his times, is shortly to discover the import of that old phrase, 'Out of the frying pan, into the fire' - said fire burning brightly at all times - in The Twilight Zone. "

Episode Summary
Woodrow Mulligan (Buster Keaton) is a grumpy janitor in 1890, dissatisfied with his time and place; a backwater town called Harmony with 17-cent cuts of meat, $2 hats, livestock freely roaming the streets, and penny-farthing bicycles that knock him down while going the speed limit (eight miles per hour).

He works for Professor Gilbert, who has just invented a time helmet. Pouncing on the opportunity, Mulligan uses the helmet to transport himself to 1960, which of course turns out to be a surprise with even higher prices and more noise. He meets Rollo (Stanley Adams), a scientist and authority on the 1890s, which he regards as "charming."

Rollo tries to go back alone, but Mulligan jumps on him and they go back together. The 1890s turn out to be not entirely what Rollo thought of them. Mulligan, however, is relieved, and when he hears Rollo griping ("This guy sounds worse than my mother-in-law," Mulligan observes through an intertitle), he sets the helmet for 1960, puts it on Rollo's head and sends him back to his own time.

Closing Narration
"To each his own' - so goes another old phrase to which Mr. Woodrow Mulligan would heartily subscribe, for he has learned - definitely the hard way - that there's much wisdom in a third old phrase, which goes as follows: 'Stay in your own backyard.' To which it might be added, 'and, if possible, assist others to stay in their's' - via, of course, The Twilight Zone."

Air Date: December 15, 1961

5 months ago

Mr. Romney Wordsworth: LIBRARIAN! Offense and Charge: OBSOLESCENCE!

The State is in total control. Books are banned. Independent speech and thought is punished with erasure/murder. The INDIVIDUAL has no say.
(Sound familiar? This is SIXTY YEARS old, and we are only getting worse, as a nation, and a world.
I guess that's been the plan all along . . .)

ROD SERLING wrote this one, and it is a literary classic. It stands up as written prose, before the cameras ever start rolling:

SERLING's OPEN: "You walk into this room at your own risk---because it leads to the future: not a future that WILL be, but one that MIGHT be.
This is not a NEW world; it is simply an extension of what began in the OLD one. It has patterned itself after every dictator who has ever planted the ripping imprint of a boot on the pages of history since the beginning of Time.
It has refinements, technological advances, and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of human freedom.
But like every one of the Super-States that preceded it, it has one iron rule: LOGIC is an enemy and TRUTH is a menace.

This is Mr. Romney Wordsworth, in his last forty-eight hours on Earth.
He's a citizen of the State, but will soon have to be eliminated, because he's built out of flesh, and because he has a mind.
Mr. Romney Wordsworth---who will draw his last breaths---in The Twilight Zone."

SERLING's CLOSE: "The chancellor---the LATE chancellor---was only partly correct.
He WAS obsolete. But so is the State: the entity he worshiped.
Any state; any entity; any ideology that fails to recognize the worth, the dignity, the rights of Man: THAT State is obsolete.
A case to be filed under "M" for "Mankind" . . . in The Twilight Zone."

The mighty BURGESS MEREDITH plays the title role; the great powerhouse FRITZ WEAVER plays The Chancellor.
Great actors meet great writing meets great direction, photography/camera angles & set construction. Classic.
First aired on June 2, 1961. (Buy the original. Don't sue me. I'm just advertising greatness and TRUTH.)

{nick*nackTRUTHattack PlayLists are here: click: https://www.bitchute.com/profile/MeV2H1QmPkYQ/ & scroll down a little . . .}

~~~ "I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens, who---reading newspapers---live and die in the belief that They have known something of what has been passing in the world in their time." ---THOMAS JEFFERSON; 1807

~~~ "Every man has the right to utter what he thinks TRUTH, and every other man has the right to knock him down for It. Martyrdom is the Test." ---SAMUEL JOHNSON; 1780

Sub. Listen. Learn. Share. Expose. -----------------------------------------------> WIN <----------------------------------------------------------------------

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5 months, 1 week ago

In a future totalitarian society, a librarian is declared obsolete and sentenced to death. Starring Burgess Meredith and Fritz Weaver.

6 months, 3 weeks ago

You walk into this room at your own risk, because it leads to the future, not a future that will be but one that might be. This is not a new world, it is simply an extension of what began in the old one. It has patterned itself after every dictator who has ever planted the ripping imprint of a boot on the pages of history since the beginning of time. It has refinements, technological advances, and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of human freedom. But like every one of the super-states that preceded it, it has one iron rule: logic is an enemy and truth is a menace. This is Mr. Romney Wordsworth, in his last forty-eight hours on Earth. He's a citizen of the State but will soon have to be eliminated, because he's built out of flesh and because he has a mind. Mr. Romney Wordsworth, who will draw his last breaths in The Twilight Zone.

7 months ago

People, people, people....

Episode Summary
Mr. Archibald Beechcroft, who has had an insufferable time just trying to get to work, becomes annoyed when an errand boy named Henry spills coffee all over his suit. Taking some aspirin in the bathroom, he encounters a co-worker, Mr. Rogers, who advises him that he needs to keep fit to avoid headaches. Beechcroft explains that he doesn't drink, stay out late, or eat poorly. He's simply tired of being pushed around and wants to eliminate all the people of the world. Later, in the cafeteria, Henry saves Beechcroft a seat, because he's still feeling guilty about spilling the coffee. He also presents Beechcroft a book titled "The Mind and the Matter", which deals with the ultimate in concentration. The book intrigues Beechcroft as he starts to reads through it in the cafeteria, and he continues to read it on the subway ride home. In his apartment, he reads the last page, and then concludes that the authors are indeed correct that concentration is the most underrated power in the universe. It then occurs to him that he can use concentration to realize his dream of eliminating people. He tests his theory out on his landlady, whom he successfully makes disappear. "Today, the landlady", Beechcroft smiles triumphantly, "tomorrow...the world!". The next day, now that Beechcroft knows he can do it, he concentrates while in the subway and suddenly all the other commuters disappear. Beechcroft walks into usually overcrowded office to find it totally empty. Despite the paradise, he soon grows extremely bored; "bored to tears", with being the last person on Earth. After trying to create diversions such as an earthquake or electrical storm, Beechcroft goes home for the night, where he gets a visit from his conscience. Instead of learning from his mistake, Beechcroft comes away with the idea of repopulating the world in his image. This proves to be an even bigger mistake, since everybody else ends up being as anti-social, rude and cranky as Beechcroft. The people even look and sound like him. His conscience convinces Beechcroft to return the world to the way it used to be, before his meddling. Things are definitely back to "normal" as Henry bumps into Beechcroft again, then asks him if he enjoyed reading "The Mind and the Matter". Beechcroft pretends to dismiss the book as "totally unbelievable", yet he knows he's learned his lesson.

1 year ago

"Librarian Romney Wordsworth is judged obsolete and sentenced to death by a Chancellor of a fascist State of the future that has banned all books and religion. He is granted three requests: that only his assassin know the method of his death, that he die at midnight the next day, and that he have a live TV audience. Forty-five minutes before he is to die, Wordsworth invites the Chancellor to his room. But he has more on his mind than a deathbed chat—he's determined to put both their ideologies to the test, and demonstrate just which man really is obsolete...in this world, and in the Twilight Zone."

Opening Narration
"You walk into this room at your own risk, because it leads to the future, not a future that will be but one that might be. This is not a new world, it is simply an extension of what began in the old one. It has patterned itself after every dictator who has ever planted the ripping imprint of a boot on the pages of history since the beginning of time. It has refinements, technological advances, and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of human freedom. But like every one of the super states that preceded it, it has one iron rule: logic is an enemy and truth is a menace. This is Mr. Romney Wordsworth, in his last forty-eight hours on Earth. He's a citizen of the State but will soon have to be eliminated, because he is built out of flesh and because he has a mind. Mr. Romney Wordsworth, who will draw his last breaths in the Twilight Zone. "

Episode Summary
In a totalitarian society, Romney Wordsworth is condemned to death for the crime of being a librarian, and he is subjected to the harangues of the state's Chancellor and his lectures about Wordsworth's obsolescence (he is also rebuked over his belief in God, whom the state declares does not exist). Wordsworth, however, makes one final request - that he be allowed to choose his method of execution and that it be televised live to the society. A television camera is installed in Wordsworth's study to broadcast his final hours and execution live to the nation. He summons the Chancellor, who arrives at exactly 11:16 p.m. After some discussion, Wordsworth reveals to the Chancellor that his chosen method of execution is by a bomb set to go off in his room at midnight. He explains that the reaction to imminent execution that will interest the public is not his own but the Chancellor's, as the door is locked and there is no one outside to help the Chancellor escape. He intends to show the nation how a spiritual man faces death, and proceeds to read from his illegal, long-hidden copy of the Bible (in particular, Psalm 23). He also points out that, as the events are being broadcast live, the State would risk losing its status in the eyes of the people by trying to rescue the Chancellor. As the time draws to a close, Wordsworth's calm acceptance of death stands in sharp contrast with the Chancellor's increasing panic. Moments before the bomb explodes, the Chancellor desperately begs to be let go "in the name of God". Wordsworth says that "in the name of God" he will release the Chancellor immediately, which he does. The Chancellor bursts out of the room and down the stairs just as the bomb explodes and kills Wordsworth, who in his last seconds of life, stands tall and has a facial expression of peace and satisfaction. In the final scene, the Chancellor returns to the courtroom to discover that his own subaltern has replaced him and that he himself is now obsolete: "You have disgraced the State. You have proven yourself a coward. You have, therefore, no function." Immediately convicted, the former Chancellor screams as the crowd in the courtroom apprehends him. He continues to plead with the court, insisting that he is in fact not obsolete and wishes only to serve the State, but is dragged away.

Trivia
Often thought of as one of the finest episodes.
Both the Chancellor and Romney Wordsworth's actors appeared in more than one other episode.
According to the Star Trek wiki, an unnamed actor in this episode also played Bobby in several episodes of Star Trek. For an unusual reason, Rod Serling, the creator, appeared in the closing narration. This would happen again in the season three episode, “The Fugitive.”

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