KHAARTOUM_EAST

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Famous Pashto dancer and actress: MUSARRAT SHAHEEN performs and extraordinary MUJRA entertainment dance in an 80s film. Dance in Western Pakistan is less India and more Arabic/Persian dance. Shaheen takes on two roles as both the man and the woman in the clip.
MUSARRAT SHAHEEN BIOGRAPHY - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musarrat_Shaheen
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

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'Aagaya Dil Par Rach Rach Ki' - A classic Anjuman and Sultan Rahi Punjabi film song sung by Nahid Akhtar in the 1985 film 'Shah Bereham' - 'Cruel King'.
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

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'Aagaya Dil Par Rach Rach Ki' - A classic Anjuman and Sultan Rahi Punjabi film song sung by Nahid Akhtar in the 1985 film 'Shah Bereham' - 'Cruel King'.
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

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'THE SOUND OF SHAKING BANGLES' or 'DA BANGRO SHOR JOR DA' is a SHATTERING SOUND and SIGHT of PUSHTO-PUNJABI-ARAB SYNTHESIZERED SYNTHESIS with ACTRESSES and ACTORS diverting attention as they INFILTRATE and EXPOSE the HIDDEN UNDERWORLD FACE and MAFIA of DUBAI. The project is ACTOR/DIRECTOR: ARBAZ KHAN'S 2007 'TIGER' PUSHTO FILM. 'TIGER' is a STYLISH CLUMSY AMATEURISH PESHWAR INDUSTRY FILM that DELIVERS a BREATH-TAKING SWORD of TRUTH that CUTS through the DELIGHTFUL Pakistani LAHORIE MOVIE of 1979: 'DUBAI CHALO'/'LET'S GO TO DUBAI' that PROMISED HAPPY LIFE and RICHES to MIGRANT PAKISTANIS doing a STINT in the UAE...'TIGER' shows a DUBAI of 2000s... A BRUTAL, CORRUPT, SLEAZE-BALL COUNTRY where EMIRATIS treat MIGRANTS, including FILIPINOS and even FELLOW MUSLIMS, as WHORES and DOGS to be OVERWORKED, UNDERPAID, INSULTED, PIMPED, IMPRISONED, RAPED and MURDERED without any RECOURSE to the LAW of the POLICE, LAW of ISLAM, or even to be in FREE POSSESSION of their own PASSPORT to CHOOSE to LEAVE UAE as they wish, i.e. ENSLAVED PARALYSED VICTIMS. WHAT A DIFFERENCE two DECADES MAKE in the MIDDLE EAST.

The SONG is an INCREDIBLE and UNIQUE NUMBER as PAKISTANI CREATION of SONGS often are. The FRAMEWORK is a PATHAN sort of TURKIC 'ROCKING' RHYTHM PATTERN, but with "Hey! Hey!" PUNJABI SHOUTS from a CHORUS. The MUSIC and WHOLE SOUND PORTFOLIO of 'TIGER' are this FIXED-PITCHED WESTERN SOUND and SYNTHESIZER that is somewhat 'OVER-RIDDEN' [like RAP COMPOSERS also do!] to CREATE an AWKWARD 'MEDIEVAL' SOUND of 'ARID' and 'UN-MUSICAL' SOUNDS in a SKELETON of MUSIC that is so AWKWARD in SHAPES and EDGES!?!? The SCORE is really something EXPERIMENTAL in its LAHORE-PUNJAB-WEST-ARAB mix...However, when I saw this in the CINEMA one time in PESHAWAR, people said they DIDN'T LIKE IT!?!?! Oh!

The SONG is one of NINE. Some PUSHTO FILMS have as many as 12 SONGS in 150 minutes! The ACTOR is PUSHTO HERO ACTOR and RELENTLESS PUSHTO FILM DIRECTOR: ARBAZ KHAN and he acts with PUNJABI ACTRESS, SIDRA NOOR [dark hair], a REGULAR for SEVERAL YEARS in PUSHTO CINEMA. However, ARBAZ KHAN [not slimmest himself!] made a STATEMENT that SIDRANOOR would DROPPED from his FILMS as her WEIGHT BALLOONED in the late 2000s, so she was RELPLACED. Most ACTRESSES in PESHAWAR FILMS are PUNJABI DANCING GIRLS who have VOICE DUB ACTRESSES for the PUSHTO SONG and DIALOGUE recorded afterwards. SEHER KHAN [lighter hair] is an actual PATHAN ACTRESS who DANCES PATHAN and SPEAKS PUSHTO. She is a RARITY to take the 'SHAME'. But SEHER is CANADIAN-PAKISTANI who GREW UP ABROAD and says she LIKES DANCING and BEING an ACTRESS...Known as 'THE BARBIE DOLL OF PESHAWAR'

'TIGER' is a STARTLING FILM with and ART FILM POLITICAL MESSAGE DEMONSTRATING and WARNING PAKISTANIS AGAINST going to the UAE to WORK. Many PAKISTANIS now have TASTED the MALTREATMENT of these places and now UNDERSTAND.

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The rich velvet voice of Yesudas sings in the South Indian language: Malalayam.
Yesudas is a Christian South Indian singer. His Christian father was an expert on HIndu scripture. Yesudas is an expert of Hindu Kanartik singing which is strange as he is not a Hindu. Yesudas sang a lot of songs, some for actors to mime to in Indian films.
**Since this video was made, Yesudas biography changed. Originally it was said he was an orphan. It is now said that he isn't.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K._J._Yesudas
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayalam
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

[Wait Up To 10 Seconds For Start - Slow Bit-Chute Buffering]
The rich velvet voice of Yesudas sings in the South Indian language: Malalayam.
Yesudas is a Christian South Indian singer. His Christian father was an expert on HIndu scripture. Yesudas is an expert of Hindu Kanartik singing which is strange as he is not a Hindu. Yesudas sang a lot of songs, some for actors to mime to in Indian films.
**Since this video was made, Yesudas biography changed. Originally it was said he was an orphan. It is now said that he isn't.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K._J._Yesudas
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayalam
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

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Turkish Director: Derviş Zaim's tense dark masterpiece of the underworld of Istanbul's mafia, police, prostitutes, drugs trade and corrupt politians. Six seemingly unconnected characters connected are by coincidence. Havva is an athlete getting ready for the marathon to find money to look after her brother disabled in the Kurdish war. Havva works in a five hotel part time where drug mafia boss Sabit tries to buy out the hotel and casino from owner Mr. Ali and his son Devrim who starts to work with political organisations to fend off the mafia. Sabit works with hitman Camoka who is also connected to a corrupt government minister who 'disappears' Camoka in a fake death after an assassination for the government and double crossing on a drugs run. A man looking similar to Camoka is executed by the government for the funeral. Camoka murders Sabit over the drugs and other corrupt projects' disagreement. It all gets into the media and smears the politician. Devrim gets into trouble as he imagines all is over because the political organisation linked to Kurdistan blow up a cafe with Turkish soldiers as customers but the bombing goes wrong and a miliant woman is killed. Devrim is terrified of being implicated and goes to Havvas house to hide out. But she and her brother are arrested in connection to the bombing at the hotel. Her brother dies from his disabilities when Havva is in police custody then she is strangely released to run the marathon. Camoka runs away abroad and has cocaine parties. Havva runs the marathon and the police chief investigating the execution of innocent men and all of the tangle of drug and government corruption begins ringing random telephone numbers telling random citizens that the country is filled with evil and he knows just enough to be killed.

Elephants and Grass is a telling portrait of Turkey in 2000.

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Turkish Director: Derviş Zaim's tense dark masterpiece of the underworld of Istanbul's mafia, police, prostitutes, drugs trade and corrupt politians. Six seemingly unconnected characters connected are by coincidence. Havva is an athlete getting ready for the marathon to find money to look after her brother disabled in the Kurdish war. Havva works in a five hotel part time where drug mafia boss Sabit tries to buy out the hotel and casino from owner Mr. Ali and his son Devrim who starts to work with political organisations to fend off the mafia. Sabit works with hitman Camoka who is also connected to a corrupt government minister who 'disappears' Camoka in a fake death after an assassination for the government and double crossing on a drugs run. A man looking similar to Camoka is executed by the government for the funeral. Camoka murders Sabit over the drugs and other corrupt projects' disagreement. It all gets into the media and smears the politician. Devrim gets into trouble as he imagines all is over because the political organisation linked to Kurdistan blow up a cafe with Turkish soldiers as customers but the bombing goes wrong and a miliant woman is killed. Devrim is terrified of being implicated and goes to Havvas house to hide out. But she and her brother are arrested in connection to the bombing at the hotel. Her brother dies from his disabilities when Havva is in police custody then she is strangely released to run the marathon. Camoka runs away abroad and has cocaine parties. Havva runs the marathon and the police chief investigating the execution of innocent men and all of the tangle of drug and government corruption begins ringing random telephone numbers telling random citizens that the country is filled with evil and he knows just enough to be killed.

Elephants and Grass is a telling portrait of Turkey in 2000.

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A talented Kurmanji Kurdish song from Van city director: Salih Dilovan. This time from the Eastern Turkey Kurdish duo Şîlan & Sozdar. The orchestration is colourful and light as the video montage. A lot of dancing rhythms and folk dance footage mixed in with the singing! This is a really nice and fresh video from the time when Kurdish, Arabic and Laz languages were freed from legal restrictions of the Turkish Republic at the end of the 1990s. A burst of regional language music and film emerged from that new era of freedom of expression.

ORCHESTRATION
The song FORM[sections over time] is typical STROPHIC [one set of text lines repeated in voices and instruments without sense of verse or chorus] found in Kurdish traditional music.

The ENSEMBLE [group of instruments/voices] is a SAZ or BAĞLAMA [Turkish Lute/Guitar]plus an ELECTRIC BAĞLAMA[An electrically amplified SAZ], NAY [overblown Turkish flute - difficult to play with breathy sound] plus electronic keyboard playing bass guitar and basic drum pattern. Most of the instruments are DOUBLE-TRACKED [recorded more than once for TONE MASS or thicker sound] plus economic reasons to make a larger ENSEMBLE without paying more musicians.

The arranging is effective. After a few notes of bass, the drum machine starts a lively rhythm and the STROPH is played in the SAZ, ELECTRIC SAZ and NAY to great effect. The ELECTRIC SAZ plays CADENCE [musical full stop] parts at the ends of section. The STROPH is repeated by the ELECTRIC SAZ, then the vocalists take turns to repeat the STROPH. The singing is relieved by the variety of playing the intro arrangement of the STROPH in TUTTI [full ensemble] then ELECTRIC SAZ and so the STROPH reapeats.

It is puzzling how well Kurdish music is orchestrated to make the very repetitive musical material that actually makes for great and enjoyable tracks.

Şîlan & Sozdar seem to have a lot of electronic effect on their voices and are often DOUBLE-TRACKED [singing along with themselves]. This maybe because they don't have strong voices, or usually it is because singers don't have 'striking' or memorable voices. Effecting the voices adds to TONE MASS and variety for the orchestration during repetitive strophic music. The melody has a narrow RANGE [span of notes making up the melody] which is typical of Kurdish Music and Pushto Music. The two musical cultures on either side of Iran have the same features of narrow REGISTER and repetitive structures.

VIDEO
The visual montage is so Kurdish and rural and delightful. There is a colour, a charm a freshness of Kurdish Music from Turkey at the bloom of the new Kurd VCD video clip era. The girls in their traditional Kurdish dresses with an underdress and and over dress, plus the long floor length sleeve trims and veils with red band signifying Kurdish Culture.

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A talented Kurmanji Kurdish song from Van city director: Salih Dilovan. This time from the Eastern Turkey Kurdish duo Şîlan & Sozdar. The orchestration is colourful and light as the video montage. A lot of dancing rhythms and folk dance footage mixed in with the singing! This is a really nice and fresh video from the time when Kurdish, Arabic and Laz languages were freed from legal restrictions of the Turkish Republic at the end of the 1990s. A burst of regional language music and film emerged from that new era of freedom of expression.

ORCHESTRATION
The song FORM[sections over time] is typical STROPHIC [one set of text lines repeated in voices and instruments without sense of verse or chorus] found in Kurdish traditional music.

The ENSEMBLE [group of instruments/voices] is a SAZ or BAĞLAMA [Turkish Lute/Guitar]plus an ELECTRIC BAĞLAMA[An electrically amplified SAZ], NAY [overblown Turkish flute - difficult to play with breathy sound] plus electronic keyboard playing bass guitar and basic drum pattern. Most of the instruments are DOUBLE-TRACKED [recorded more than once for TONE MASS or thicker sound] plus economic reasons to make a larger ENSEMBLE without paying more musicians.

The arranging is effective. After a few notes of bass, the drum machine starts a lively rhythm and the STROPH is played in the SAZ, ELECTRIC SAZ and NAY to great effect. The ELECTRIC SAZ plays CADENCE [musical full stop] parts at the ends of section. The STROPH is repeated by the ELECTRIC SAZ, then the vocalists take turns to repeat the STROPH. The singing is relieved by the variety of playing the intro arrangement of the STROPH in TUTTI [full ensemble] then ELECTRIC SAZ and so the STROPH reapeats.

It is puzzling how well Kurdish music is orchestrated to make the very repetitive musical material that actually makes for great and enjoyable tracks.

Şîlan & Sozdar seem to have a lot of electronic effect on their voices and are often DOUBLE-TRACKED [singing along with themselves]. This maybe because they don't have strong voices, or usually it is because singers don't have 'striking' or memorable voices. Effecting the voices adds to TONE MASS and variety for the orchestration during repetitive strophic music. The melody has a narrow RANGE [span of notes making up the melody] which is typical of Kurdish Music and Pushto Music. The two musical cultures on either side of Iran have the same features of narrow REGISTER and repetitive structures.

VIDEO
The visual montage is so Kurdish and rural and delightful. There is a colour, a charm a freshness of Kurdish Music from Turkey at the bloom of the new Kurd VCD video clip era. The girls in their traditional Kurdish dresses with an underdress and and over dress, plus the long floor length sleeve trims and veils with red band signifying Kurdish Culture.

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This film song is interesting as the dancer is wearing a KATHAK costume from Indian culture. It is rare to see this kind of dance shown in Pushto Cinema because Middle Eastern BELLY DANCE is geographically and culturally closer to Pushto Culture. The flared skirt, tight under-trouser and ankle bells of the KATHAK showcase spins and foot-stamping. However, a lot of the dancing during musical BRIDGES is PUNJABI BHANGRA [a farmers dance from The Punjab involving shoulder-shaking and stepping in and out with one foot]. The singing is PATHAN in style from PLAYBACK SINGER [a professional vocalist who can sing in a CINE style for movie actors with average voices to mime to] GULNAR BEGUM. The musical style changes between the INSTRUMENTAL parts which are more PUNJABI to the SUNG parts which are more PUSHTO in style? The instruments are more INDIAN drums and TURKIC RABAB [A kind of two string TURKIC LUTE like Turkish SAZ].

ORCHESTRATION
The FORM [sections over time] are curious in the song, but common in Pushto Filmi Mujras. There seems to be a two strand approach to these dances which have INTRO + BRIDGES + CODA [end section] in more of a PUNJAB[I on-beat] style with the main VOCAL SECTIONS in a PATHAN 'rocking' SYNCOPATED [off-beat] pattern. This must surely be for CONTRAST and VARIETY for the listener? The more INDIAN instrumental sections maybe open more opportunity for a variety of dance movements to show off the MUJRA?

PUSHTO CINEMA
The Pushto Film Industry started late after the 1947 Partition of Indian and Pakistan. Urdu and Punjabi films were produced in Lahore from 1948. The first Pushto language film was not made until 1965. The original 1960s style was respectable and based on folk tales as family films. By the time of the The Islamic Revolution of 1979, Pushto Cinema had begun to deline under the control of local governers into what is descibed as 'soft core pornography' by some. The label of 'vulgarity' remains on contemporary Peshwari Films.

THIS MUJRA: 'Zari Shaga'
Colour films came late to the small Pakistani Film Industry mainly due to lack of facilities to process footage into colour. Hence, this late 1970s film is in black and white. MUJRA means 'entertainment dance' and comes from the palaces of The Mughal Empire. There is a cultural fascination in the Northern Indian area for men watching dancing an feeling 'comforted' by TAWAIFS [dancing girls or boys].

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'OH, OH, OH, IT'S HOT!' is a 1984 SMASH HIT SONG from 'MAQSAD' by 'NEW WAVE' COMPOSER: BAPPI LAHIRI. SOUTH INDIAN BEAUTY 'SRIDEVI' sensually POUTS and SMOOCHES with CLASSIC ACTOR 'RAJESH KHANNA' in this HOT and STEAMY 'NEW WAVE' CHOREOGRAPHY sung by ASHA BHONSLE and KISHORE KUMAR [Click 'Show more' for full analysis]

What is COMPOSER BAPPI LAHIRI'S 'NEW WAVE' STYLE?
BAPPI LAHIRI [b.1957] created 'NEW WAVE' in the 1980s from his combination of WESTERN DISCO with INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC with KEYBOARDS and THE MULTI-TRACK RECORDING STUDIO AS A CREATIVE TOOL.

LAHIRI'S film IMAGERY, SONG PICTURISATIONS and THEMES seemed INFLUENCED by the SOUTH INDIAN FILM INDUSTRY - a TERM used to COMBINE a number of unconnected PROVINCIAL SOUTHERN MEDIA in languages: TAMIL, TELEGU, MALAYALAM, KANNADA.

The reason for the INFLUENCE coming from THE SOUTH may have been POLITICAL CHANGE away from GHANDI'S 'ALL INCLUSIVE INDIA' multicultural HINDI FILM layouts. It may habe been a REACTION to the beginning of INSULAR INDIAN MARKETS being infiltrated by the INTERNATIONAL thus a RETURN to a HINDU-THEMED CINEMA like SOUTH PROVINCES. Further to this, the SOUTH CINEMA in INDIA had a SURGE in POPULARITY and BOX OFFICE in HINDUISTIC SONG FILMS from 1976 to 1982...BOMBAY maybe saw a MARKET...

'MAQSAD' or 'AIM' is a 1984 HINDI remake of SOUTH INDIAN FILM: 'MUNDADUGU' from 1983. The ACTRESSES are JAYA PRADA and SRIDEVI are both HINDUISTIC BEAUTIES of SOUTH with a curious IDIOSYNCRATIC CONTRAST of 48" 'GODDESS' HAIRPIECES and INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE style MAKE UP, or WESTERN 80s FASHION CLOTHES and SHORTER HAIRPIECES, yet looking very 'INDIAN-ISED' and not 'WESTERN' or 'WESTERN-WANNABE' as is the current trend of INDIAN CINEMA.

The CHOREOGRAPHY of LAHIRI'S SONGS is CABARET-STYLE of BHARATA NATYAM as STATUE POSE MOVES curiously either as DIRECTLY CLASSICAL or INDIRECTLY in WESTERN FASHION DRESS. Whichever way they are presented, RADHA and KRISHNA are PROJECTED as HINDU STORIES in SHOCKS of SENSUALISM.

'HOYE HOYE HOYE GARMI HAI'
LAHIRI used REVOLUTIONARY ideas of SEQUENCER SAMPLER KEYBOARDS, DRUM MACHINES and MULTI-TRACKED STRINGS plus TRADITIONAL INSTRUMENTS all combined.

The whole song has a QUASI-HOMOPHONIC TEXTURE which is probably due to the 'CONTROLLER' of the TRACK being an ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD. HOMOPHONY is the TEXTURE of MELODY with ACCOMPANIMENT CHORDS and BASS, the MELODY being FRAMED by the SUBSERVIANT ACCOMPANIMENT that never overwhelms the TUNE.

However, as ever, INDIA [like TURKEY and EGYPT] never gives up its MONODIC [one melody and drums] ROOTS and so the 'HOMOPHONY' is a FALSE one that is actually just an 'EFFECT'. There is not real 'HARMONY' in a WESTERN SENSE but a LAYERING of SOUNDS with a MELODY SUNG or PLAYED over the top. This is a more OLD WORLD way of MAKING MUSIC. In the INDIAN CINEMA it is NECESSARY for SOLVING the PROBLEM of THIN TEXTURE, MIDDLE REGISTER INSTRUMENTS and LACK of VARIETY.

[Wait Up To 10 Seconds For Play – Slow Bit-Chute Buffering]
'OH, OH, OH, IT'S HOT!' is a 1984 SMASH HIT SONG from 'MAQSAD' by 'NEW WAVE' COMPOSER: BAPPI LAHIRI. SOUTH INDIAN BEAUTY 'SRIDEVI' sensually POUTS and SMOOCHES with CLASSIC ACTOR 'RAJESH KHANNA' in this HOT and STEAMY 'NEW WAVE' CHOREOGRAPHY sung by ASHA BHONSLE and KISHORE KUMAR [Click 'Show more' for full analysis]

What is COMPOSER BAPPI LAHIRI'S 'NEW WAVE' STYLE?
BAPPI LAHIRI [b.1957] created 'NEW WAVE' in the 1980s from his combination of WESTERN DISCO with INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC with KEYBOARDS and THE MULTI-TRACK RECORDING STUDIO AS A CREATIVE TOOL.

LAHIRI'S film IMAGERY, SONG PICTURISATIONS and THEMES seemed INFLUENCED by the SOUTH INDIAN FILM INDUSTRY - a TERM used to COMBINE a number of unconnected PROVINCIAL SOUTHERN MEDIA in languages: TAMIL, TELEGU, MALAYALAM, KANNADA.

The reason for the INFLUENCE coming from THE SOUTH may have been POLITICAL CHANGE away from GHANDI'S 'ALL INCLUSIVE INDIA' multicultural HINDI FILM layouts. It may habe been a REACTION to the beginning of INSULAR INDIAN MARKETS being infiltrated by the INTERNATIONAL thus a RETURN to a HINDU-THEMED CINEMA like SOUTH PROVINCES. Further to this, the SOUTH CINEMA in INDIA had a SURGE in POPULARITY and BOX OFFICE in HINDUISTIC SONG FILMS from 1976 to 1982...BOMBAY maybe saw a MARKET...

'MAQSAD' or 'AIM' is a 1984 HINDI remake of SOUTH INDIAN FILM: 'MUNDADUGU' from 1983. The ACTRESSES are JAYA PRADA and SRIDEVI are both HINDUISTIC BEAUTIES of SOUTH with a curious IDIOSYNCRATIC CONTRAST of 48" 'GODDESS' HAIRPIECES and INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE style MAKE UP, or WESTERN 80s FASHION CLOTHES and SHORTER HAIRPIECES, yet looking very 'INDIAN-ISED' and not 'WESTERN' or 'WESTERN-WANNABE' as is the current trend of INDIAN CINEMA.

The CHOREOGRAPHY of LAHIRI'S SONGS is CABARET-STYLE of BHARATA NATYAM as STATUE POSE MOVES curiously either as DIRECTLY CLASSICAL or INDIRECTLY in WESTERN FASHION DRESS. Whichever way they are presented, RADHA and KRISHNA are PROJECTED as HINDU STORIES in SHOCKS of SENSUALISM.

'HOYE HOYE HOYE GARMI HAI'
LAHIRI used REVOLUTIONARY ideas of SEQUENCER SAMPLER KEYBOARDS, DRUM MACHINES and MULTI-TRACKED STRINGS plus TRADITIONAL INSTRUMENTS all combined.

The whole song has a QUASI-HOMOPHONIC TEXTURE which is probably due to the 'CONTROLLER' of the TRACK being an ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD. HOMOPHONY is the TEXTURE of MELODY with ACCOMPANIMENT CHORDS and BASS, the MELODY being FRAMED by the SUBSERVIANT ACCOMPANIMENT that never overwhelms the TUNE.

However, as ever, INDIA [like TURKEY and EGYPT] never gives up its MONODIC [one melody and drums] ROOTS and so the 'HOMOPHONY' is a FALSE one that is actually just an 'EFFECT'. There is not real 'HARMONY' in a WESTERN SENSE but a LAYERING of SOUNDS with a MELODY SUNG or PLAYED over the top. This is a more OLD WORLD way of MAKING MUSIC. In the INDIAN CINEMA it is NECESSARY for SOLVING the PROBLEM of THIN TEXTURE, MIDDLE REGISTER INSTRUMENTS and LACK of VARIETY.

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'Hemmaleler' is a brilliant example of Van city based Salih Dilovan's Kurdish music production of the early 2000s. ELIF BIYANI is a brilliant vocalist who mixes modernity and tradition to create the fresh Eastern Turkey Kurdish media that came to life when language restriction on Kurdish media was lifted in Turkish Republic in 2000.

The song uses drum machine and random layers of keyboard sounds with a compliment of double-tracked vocals. The Turkish saz lute is also added to give the traditional flavour.
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

[Wait 10 seconds - Slow Bit-Chute buffering]
'Hemmaleler' is a brilliant example of Van city based Salih Dilovan's Kurdish music production of the early 2000s. ELIF BIYANI is a brilliant vocalist who mixes modernity and tradition to create the fresh Eastern Turkey Kurdish media that came to life when language restriction on Kurdish media was lifted in Turkish Republic in 2000.

The song uses drum machine and random layers of keyboard sounds with a compliment of double-tracked vocals. The Turkish saz lute is also added to give the traditional flavour.
KHAARTOUM_LETS_TALK - POLITICS and DAFTNESS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/khaartoum_lets_talk/

KHAARTOUM_SINGS - COVER SONGS and ORIGINAL SONGS
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ujvtp7SxRKJr/

KHAARTOUM_EAST - COMMERCIAL EASTERN MEDIA with ENGLISH LANGUAGE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL ARTICLES
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/akjupya3Auqo/

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ACTOR: ALI EJAZ SHOCKS his WIFE, ACTRESS: MUMTAZ, with his BRAZEN PUNJABI MUJRA DANCING with ACTRESS/DANCER: IMROZIA in the role as the INVITED MUJRAWALI. 'MENOO AEWEN LOKI KEHENDE' comes from the 1983 PUNJABI FILM: 'SUSRAL CHALO'. The SONG is another TOTALLY UNIQUE PICTURISATION, once seen - never forgotten! The COMPOSITION of the NUMBER has a kind of STRANGE 'BALANCE' of TENSIONS in the MELODY STRUCTURE and STRANGE sort of 'BALANCE' in the ORCHESTRAL PARTS that SEE-SAW in their RESPECTIVE AREAS, but also the MERGE of this ODD 'BALANCE' of ENERGIES and TENSIONS of the ORCHESTRA and MELODY WRITING GEL TOGETHER to make a SONG that is SO COMPELLING and SO ATTRACTIVE to LISTEN to AGAIN and AGAIN? 'MENOO AEWEN...' is a PECULIAR PIECE of MUSIC. It is a PUNJABI SONG but it has a VAGUE 'TANG' of PATHAN MUSIC, a FEELING of PUSHTO CINEMA that is NOT OBVIOUS, but it's DRUMMING PATTERNS and USE of a SOLO and very VIRTUOSIC MANDOLIN as a BRIDGING PHRASE between SUNG PHRASES that SUGGEST the TURKIC RABAB LUTE used in PESHWARI MUSIC.

SINGER: NAHID AKHTAR is a STRANGE CHOICE in the EARLY 1980s where NOOR JEHAN sang MOST SONGS of the PUNJABI CINEMA. NAHID'S VOICE is HARD to DESCRIBE. It is STARK but 'LIGHT' in a WAY that BRINGS out a DELICATE and maybe more 'BELIEVABLE' DANCING GIRL?

The ORCHESTRATION is such a BALANCING ACT of INTERACTION that has a lot of INSTRUMENTAL PHRASES that use MICRO QUESTION and ANSWER DIALOGUE in a PULL-PUSH ENERGY that COMPELS the LISTENER to WANT to CARRY ON ENGAGING in the SONG to TASTE more of this JIGSAW of 'TIT-FOR-TAT MINI CONVERSATIONS' between the PARTS of the ORCHESTRA that CREATE a COLOURFUL SONIC ARCHITECTURE that has a very THIN TEXTURE but a WIDE VARIETY of DIFFERENT SOUNDS ENTWINED ORNATELY around the TUNE.

The VIOLINS play three ROLES. Firstly, FAST PACED 'FLURRY' of DIRECTIONLESS SCALE RUNS as CADENCES [musical full stops at the end of sections]. Secondly, the VIOLINS have FUNCTION as HARD BOWED 'STABS' that add HIGH PITCHED SHARP 'CUTS' in the TEXTURE against the QUITE LOW PITCHED ALTO VOCAL of PLAYBACK SINGER: NAHID AKHTAR. The STRING 'STABS' add COLOUR, PITCH SONORITY and RHYTHMIC BREAK UP after the SINGER with only DRUMS becomes too 'DEHYDRATED' on the THIN FABRIC of the ORCHESTRATION. The VIOLIN STABS are QUITE UNIQUE to PUNJABI CINEMA of the 80s and are an UNNATURAL and STARK UNSUBTLE type of ORCHESTRATION. Thirdly, the VIOLINS also work in a more SUBTLE way of SCALE RUNS up to FIXED NOTE and OCTAVE above the VOCALIST on the REPEATS. This REFRESHES the PALETTE for the LISTENER and adds a CHARGED UPWARD ZESTY 'THRILL' to the SONG...PROGRAMMATICALLY, the STRING SWIRLS are EXPRESSING the RISING SEXUAL ENERGY and HINTING at ORGASMIC ENERGY and 'NASHA' that the DANCING and SASSY WORDS are AROUSING...But the AUDIENCE only EXPERIENCES the HIDDEN LANGUAGE of the ORCHESTRA as a SUBLIMINAL ENGAGEMENT with 'some sort of excitement', not realising that they are BEING MANIPULATED by the ORCHESTRATOR'S BOX OF TRICKS.

[Wait Up To 10 Seconds For Start - Slow Bit-Chute Buffering]
ACTOR: ALI EJAZ SHOCKS his WIFE, ACTRESS: MUMTAZ, with his BRAZEN PUNJABI MUJRA DANCING with ACTRESS/DANCER: IMROZIA in the role as the INVITED MUJRAWALI. 'MENOO AEWEN LOKI KEHENDE' comes from the 1983 PUNJABI FILM: 'SUSRAL CHALO'. The SONG is another TOTALLY UNIQUE PICTURISATION, once seen - never forgotten! The COMPOSITION of the NUMBER has a kind of STRANGE 'BALANCE' of TENSIONS in the MELODY STRUCTURE and STRANGE sort of 'BALANCE' in the ORCHESTRAL PARTS that SEE-SAW in their RESPECTIVE AREAS, but also the MERGE of this ODD 'BALANCE' of ENERGIES and TENSIONS of the ORCHESTRA and MELODY WRITING GEL TOGETHER to make a SONG that is SO COMPELLING and SO ATTRACTIVE to LISTEN to AGAIN and AGAIN? 'MENOO AEWEN...' is a PECULIAR PIECE of MUSIC. It is a PUNJABI SONG but it has a VAGUE 'TANG' of PATHAN MUSIC, a FEELING of PUSHTO CINEMA that is NOT OBVIOUS, but it's DRUMMING PATTERNS and USE of a SOLO and very VIRTUOSIC MANDOLIN as a BRIDGING PHRASE between SUNG PHRASES that SUGGEST the TURKIC RABAB LUTE used in PESHWARI MUSIC.

SINGER: NAHID AKHTAR is a STRANGE CHOICE in the EARLY 1980s where NOOR JEHAN sang MOST SONGS of the PUNJABI CINEMA. NAHID'S VOICE is HARD to DESCRIBE. It is STARK but 'LIGHT' in a WAY that BRINGS out a DELICATE and maybe more 'BELIEVABLE' DANCING GIRL?

The ORCHESTRATION is such a BALANCING ACT of INTERACTION that has a lot of INSTRUMENTAL PHRASES that use MICRO QUESTION and ANSWER DIALOGUE in a PULL-PUSH ENERGY that COMPELS the LISTENER to WANT to CARRY ON ENGAGING in the SONG to TASTE more of this JIGSAW of 'TIT-FOR-TAT MINI CONVERSATIONS' between the PARTS of the ORCHESTRA that CREATE a COLOURFUL SONIC ARCHITECTURE that has a very THIN TEXTURE but a WIDE VARIETY of DIFFERENT SOUNDS ENTWINED ORNATELY around the TUNE.

The VIOLINS play three ROLES. Firstly, FAST PACED 'FLURRY' of DIRECTIONLESS SCALE RUNS as CADENCES [musical full stops at the end of sections]. Secondly, the VIOLINS have FUNCTION as HARD BOWED 'STABS' that add HIGH PITCHED SHARP 'CUTS' in the TEXTURE against the QUITE LOW PITCHED ALTO VOCAL of PLAYBACK SINGER: NAHID AKHTAR. The STRING 'STABS' add COLOUR, PITCH SONORITY and RHYTHMIC BREAK UP after the SINGER with only DRUMS becomes too 'DEHYDRATED' on the THIN FABRIC of the ORCHESTRATION. The VIOLIN STABS are QUITE UNIQUE to PUNJABI CINEMA of the 80s and are an UNNATURAL and STARK UNSUBTLE type of ORCHESTRATION. Thirdly, the VIOLINS also work in a more SUBTLE way of SCALE RUNS up to FIXED NOTE and OCTAVE above the VOCALIST on the REPEATS. This REFRESHES the PALETTE for the LISTENER and adds a CHARGED UPWARD ZESTY 'THRILL' to the SONG...PROGRAMMATICALLY, the STRING SWIRLS are EXPRESSING the RISING SEXUAL ENERGY and HINTING at ORGASMIC ENERGY and 'NASHA' that the DANCING and SASSY WORDS are AROUSING...But the AUDIENCE only EXPERIENCES the HIDDEN LANGUAGE of the ORCHESTRA as a SUBLIMINAL ENGAGEMENT with 'some sort of excitement', not realising that they are BEING MANIPULATED by the ORCHESTRATOR'S BOX OF TRICKS.

Pashto hero BADAR MUNIR is filmed with a Pashto actress of the late 80 miming playback singer AKAL MINA. The picturisation is unusual for a Pashto film song which often doesn't rely on chorus line and hero on a Shia white horse 'Zuljana'. There seems to be an echo of the Punjabi film songs of Anjuman and Sultan Rahi that were so successful in Lahore at the time.
The Pashto film song medium has a reliance upon repetitive beats and narrow melodies making the songs sound similar to the untrained ear. However, every now and again, the foreign ear picks up on a Pathan song that stands out in it's well-written music and memorability - 'Mayan Kho Der' from 1980s Pushto film 'Khabarana Da Pakhtoonah ['Stories of the Pushtoons']....The jumping TUTTI [whole orchestra plays the rhythm together] fanfare opening the song into a series of question and answer ANTIPHONY parts in the PERCUSSION [instruments you hit] into another TUTTI which swirls into a rush of violins up the scale into the main drum beat is MAGIC! The instruments and TIMBRES [tone colours that identify a particular instrument to the ear] are so carefully rotated and organised into a delight of sounds and rhythms that the listener, Pushto speaker or not, is drawn to listen to something so beautiful and talented!

ORCHESTRATION
'Khabarah Da Pakhtoonah' is from the earlier 'boom times' of Pakistani Cinema when ticket and cassette sales allowed big orchestras and best artists to be brought together for the creation of art of a high quality. The ENSEMBLE [group of instruments/vocalists] is quite large. There is a variety of traditional PERCUSSION creating the typical SYNCOPATED [off-beat] drum patterns which feel in a METRE [number of beats per bar] of five or seven, but it is actually counted in four. The Pathan Music often has this rhythm that 'rocks' backwards and forwards between two off beat stresses. All of the PERCUSSION is ACCOUSTIC [live], even the hand claps[the alternating use of claps give the song a lot of freshness and character]. There are alternating changes in rhythm patterns for variety in different sections. T

A small group of Western Violins play upward scale runs as CADENCES [musical full stops], ANTIPHONAL answering phrases or playing melodic parts during the bridges for variety. The violins have been fortified by DOUBLING [playing the same melody] them with a string sample on an electronic keyboard - it makes for increased TONE MASS [thicker sound] but the violins sound harsh and unnatural somehow.

Traditional RABAB [A Turkic lute with two metalic sounding strings] fill in with 'rocking' OSTINATOS [repeated small melodies] and melodic fills for variety.

There is also use of traditional flute and HARMONIUM [floor organ based on Western Tuned Instrument]. These two offer different TIMBRES to explore.

Playback singer Akal Mina has a compelling voice - The REGISTER [high or low pitch] is ALTO [lower pitch woman's voice].

Pashto hero BADAR MUNIR is filmed with a Pashto actress of the late 80 miming playback singer AKAL MINA. The picturisation is unusual for a Pashto film song which often doesn't rely on chorus line and hero on a Shia white horse 'Zuljana'. There seems to be an echo of the Punjabi film songs of Anjuman and Sultan Rahi that were so successful in Lahore at the time.
The Pashto film song medium has a reliance upon repetitive beats and narrow melodies making the songs sound similar to the untrained ear. However, every now and again, the foreign ear picks up on a Pathan song that stands out in it's well-written music and memorability - 'Mayan Kho Der' from 1980s Pushto film 'Khabarana Da Pakhtoonah ['Stories of the Pushtoons']....The jumping TUTTI [whole orchestra plays the rhythm together] fanfare opening the song into a series of question and answer ANTIPHONY parts in the PERCUSSION [instruments you hit] into another TUTTI which swirls into a rush of violins up the scale into the main drum beat is MAGIC! The instruments and TIMBRES [tone colours that identify a particular instrument to the ear] are so carefully rotated and organised into a delight of sounds and rhythms that the listener, Pushto speaker or not, is drawn to listen to something so beautiful and talented!

ORCHESTRATION
'Khabarah Da Pakhtoonah' is from the earlier 'boom times' of Pakistani Cinema when ticket and cassette sales allowed big orchestras and best artists to be brought together for the creation of art of a high quality. The ENSEMBLE [group of instruments/vocalists] is quite large. There is a variety of traditional PERCUSSION creating the typical SYNCOPATED [off-beat] drum patterns which feel in a METRE [number of beats per bar] of five or seven, but it is actually counted in four. The Pathan Music often has this rhythm that 'rocks' backwards and forwards between two off beat stresses. All of the PERCUSSION is ACCOUSTIC [live], even the hand claps[the alternating use of claps give the song a lot of freshness and character]. There are alternating changes in rhythm patterns for variety in different sections. T

A small group of Western Violins play upward scale runs as CADENCES [musical full stops], ANTIPHONAL answering phrases or playing melodic parts during the bridges for variety. The violins have been fortified by DOUBLING [playing the same melody] them with a string sample on an electronic keyboard - it makes for increased TONE MASS [thicker sound] but the violins sound harsh and unnatural somehow.

Traditional RABAB [A Turkic lute with two metalic sounding strings] fill in with 'rocking' OSTINATOS [repeated small melodies] and melodic fills for variety.

There is also use of traditional flute and HARMONIUM [floor organ based on Western Tuned Instrument]. These two offer different TIMBRES to explore.

Playback singer Akal Mina has a compelling voice - The REGISTER [high or low pitch] is ALTO [lower pitch woman's voice].

[Wait Up To 10 Seconds - Slow Bit-Chute Buffering]
'PYAR MEN MOHABBAT MEN' from 1981 Hindi film 'ROCKY' is iconic and unforgettable. Reena Roy and Sanjay Dutt are now elderly people. Here they both looked the best they ever did. Reena looks so theatrical and earnest in the role. Sanjay is fresh and young in his first film with an understanding of heartache and youth. It is strange to see these beautiful Hindi songs as Indian Cinema today seems unable to produce songs, singers, dances, picturisations or actors with the quality of 'Rocky' yet it was only 30 years ago?

MUJRA is shown in this song as it existed for centuries in the Northern Subcontinent. Courtesans would wear this flared skirt with trousers beneath with heavy make up and jewellery. They would offer comfort to men mostly through song, not necessarily prostitution.

The dance KATHAK is stylistically marked by bells on the ankles and foot stamping to the TABLA [Indian floor drums tuned (I)* & (V)**]. Spinning to flare the skirt and possibly enact aspects of SUFISM [a mystical way of religion - spinning to 'lose oneself and become energy' is a concept of SUFIS]. These courtesans, like Japanese Geisha, are Custodians of the Culture. They often keep ancient dances, poetry, music forms and instruments alive.

ORCHESTRATION
FORM [sections over time] is Western Pop Song: Intro 01 [VARIATION of chorus] + Intro 02 ALAAP [passage sung on vowels - this is done to add more GHAZAL effect] + Chorus (I)* + Bridge 01 with SITAR [Indian lute] + Verse (V)** + Chorus (I)* + Bridge 02 solo VIOLIN + Verse (V)** + Chorus (I)* + CODA* [end section][TABLA fill then chorus repeat].

* TONIC 'home' 'doh'/'sa' melody note area
** DOMINANT fifth 'soh'/'pa' melody note area

The lyrics are set like a GHAZAL [short lyrical poem in couplets - typical of MUJRA]. But this is done for effect as the FORM and ORCHESTRATION are heavily Western to fit the cinema media.

The PLAYBACK SINGER [a singer who records a track for an actor to mime to] voice has been heavily altered with electronic effect. The voice is mixed with a thick REVERB [electronic echo] as two tracks. So Asha's voice can be heard 'flat' to get the pronunciation of words but the REVERB track is shrouding the back end of the voice with heavy echo. The ALAAP is almost DOUBLE-TRACKED and the decision for REVERB + VOICE TRACK DOUBLING must have been made for TONE MASS [thicker tone]. In conclusion, on close analysis the vocal is very unnatural and could not be performed live so well.

The ORCHESTRATION is sophisticated. R.D. Burman had a way of blending Western Media with Indian song. However, some of this MUJRA seems to be PASTICHE [in the style of] with small touches of the Mughal Empire decorating this film song. The whole ORCHESTRATION is LAYERED. There are no chords as such, or HARMONY. The composition is LINEAR MONODIC [a tune composed from beginning to end as a line melody to be sung with drums and not chords or bass line].

[Wait Up To 10 Seconds - Slow Bit-Chute Buffering]
'PYAR MEN MOHABBAT MEN' from 1981 Hindi film 'ROCKY' is iconic and unforgettable. Reena Roy and Sanjay Dutt are now elderly people. Here they both looked the best they ever did. Reena looks so theatrical and earnest in the role. Sanjay is fresh and young in his first film with an understanding of heartache and youth. It is strange to see these beautiful Hindi songs as Indian Cinema today seems unable to produce songs, singers, dances, picturisations or actors with the quality of 'Rocky' yet it was only 30 years ago?

MUJRA is shown in this song as it existed for centuries in the Northern Subcontinent. Courtesans would wear this flared skirt with trousers beneath with heavy make up and jewellery. They would offer comfort to men mostly through song, not necessarily prostitution.

The dance KATHAK is stylistically marked by bells on the ankles and foot stamping to the TABLA [Indian floor drums tuned (I)* & (V)**]. Spinning to flare the skirt and possibly enact aspects of SUFISM [a mystical way of religion - spinning to 'lose oneself and become energy' is a concept of SUFIS]. These courtesans, like Japanese Geisha, are Custodians of the Culture. They often keep ancient dances, poetry, music forms and instruments alive.

ORCHESTRATION
FORM [sections over time] is Western Pop Song: Intro 01 [VARIATION of chorus] + Intro 02 ALAAP [passage sung on vowels - this is done to add more GHAZAL effect] + Chorus (I)* + Bridge 01 with SITAR [Indian lute] + Verse (V)** + Chorus (I)* + Bridge 02 solo VIOLIN + Verse (V)** + Chorus (I)* + CODA* [end section][TABLA fill then chorus repeat].

* TONIC 'home' 'doh'/'sa' melody note area
** DOMINANT fifth 'soh'/'pa' melody note area

The lyrics are set like a GHAZAL [short lyrical poem in couplets - typical of MUJRA]. But this is done for effect as the FORM and ORCHESTRATION are heavily Western to fit the cinema media.

The PLAYBACK SINGER [a singer who records a track for an actor to mime to] voice has been heavily altered with electronic effect. The voice is mixed with a thick REVERB [electronic echo] as two tracks. So Asha's voice can be heard 'flat' to get the pronunciation of words but the REVERB track is shrouding the back end of the voice with heavy echo. The ALAAP is almost DOUBLE-TRACKED and the decision for REVERB + VOICE TRACK DOUBLING must have been made for TONE MASS [thicker tone]. In conclusion, on close analysis the vocal is very unnatural and could not be performed live so well.

The ORCHESTRATION is sophisticated. R.D. Burman had a way of blending Western Media with Indian song. However, some of this MUJRA seems to be PASTICHE [in the style of] with small touches of the Mughal Empire decorating this film song. The whole ORCHESTRATION is LAYERED. There are no chords as such, or HARMONY. The composition is LINEAR MONODIC [a tune composed from beginning to end as a line melody to be sung with drums and not chords or bass line].

"Who's Coming!?"..."ASENA!"...This was the catch-phrase entrance of ASENA, Turkey's most well known and MODERNISING BELLY DANCER from singer host İBRAHİM TATLISES on his variety program 'The İbo Show'...

Like TURKISH FOLK star, SABAHAT AKKIRAZ, and Egypt's BELLY DANCER, DINA, ASENA lived ABROAD a lot as a child. Both SABAHAT and ASENA were Turks who lived in Germany and brought their own FOREIGN ideas, education and romantic 'oriental art' ideals to Turkey, unlike Turkey-born stars who wished to 'Americanise' everything.

Egypt's Dancer DINA lived extensively in Italy as a child and also brought a similar ideal to Egyptian BELLY DANCE, unlike the 'conservative' women of 1980s Egypt who would not consider Dance as a career or Cultural area for MODERNISATION.

BELLY DANCE is a somewhat difficult topic in The Turkish Republic. The political reforms of The Republic from 1923 were in place to make Turkey: "Turn to the West" in terms of Culture and Politics.

A serious argument in both Turkey and Egypt, particularly in these times of Piousness and Religious Fundamentalism: "Is Belly Dance Egyptian or Turkish?" This is the big question as neither country in the Pious Times seems to want 'responsibility' for the dance.

Turks will often say: "Belly Dance never existed in Turkey until The Ottomans colonised Egypt and it came from there".

Egyptians will often say: "Belly Dance is an 'oriental' style brought from India by The Ottomans and never existed in Egypt before The Ottoman Empire".

There is evidence that BELLY was originally ceremoniously done in all-female gatherings in Egypt during child-birth to distract the mother from the pain and anxiety in Egypt. There is some evidence that BELLY DANCE may have been performed in Turkish Palaces. There is also some speculation that this 'Women's Dance' was made into a dance for men by liberalisation under The British Empire.

One thing is clear, BELLY DANCE in Turkey and Egypt are in different styles with Turkish performers being more athletic with larger whole body moves. However, in Egypt, the dance is more static and un-athletic with more focus on hip shaking and certain stylistic movements that are not seen in Turkish artists.

MIDDLE EASTERN DANCE and MUSIC are something that that Modern Turkey had no real place for and for decades until the time of Cinema. Turkish Films tended to copy Egypt's Films with BELLY DANCERS that were imported from Cairo for a time then stopped as Arabic was a language that was 'forbidden' in The Turkish Republic. Turk Cinema employed BELLY DANCE numbers that were out of context with contemporary Turkish Culture but blindly followed Egypt as other film industries were not so similar in culture to Turkey.

BELLY DANCE became re-established in Turkey through Cinema but with an image of larger heavier ladies imitating Egyptian Cinema. BELLY DANCE became mainly a Tourist Culture done in night clubs or theatres. By 1980s the interest in MIDDLE EASTERN ENTERTAINMENT waned.

"Who's Coming!?"..."ASENA!"...This was the catch-phrase entrance of ASENA, Turkey's most well known and MODERNISING BELLY DANCER from singer host İBRAHİM TATLISES on his variety program 'The İbo Show'...

Like TURKISH FOLK star, SABAHAT AKKIRAZ, and Egypt's BELLY DANCER, DINA, ASENA lived ABROAD a lot as a child. Both SABAHAT and ASENA were Turks who lived in Germany and brought their own FOREIGN ideas, education and romantic 'oriental art' ideals to Turkey, unlike Turkey-born stars who wished to 'Americanise' everything.

Egypt's Dancer DINA lived extensively in Italy as a child and also brought a similar ideal to Egyptian BELLY DANCE, unlike the 'conservative' women of 1980s Egypt who would not consider Dance as a career or Cultural area for MODERNISATION.

BELLY DANCE is a somewhat difficult topic in The Turkish Republic. The political reforms of The Republic from 1923 were in place to make Turkey: "Turn to the West" in terms of Culture and Politics.

A serious argument in both Turkey and Egypt, particularly in these times of Piousness and Religious Fundamentalism: "Is Belly Dance Egyptian or Turkish?" This is the big question as neither country in the Pious Times seems to want 'responsibility' for the dance.

Turks will often say: "Belly Dance never existed in Turkey until The Ottomans colonised Egypt and it came from there".

Egyptians will often say: "Belly Dance is an 'oriental' style brought from India by The Ottomans and never existed in Egypt before The Ottoman Empire".

There is evidence that BELLY was originally ceremoniously done in all-female gatherings in Egypt during child-birth to distract the mother from the pain and anxiety in Egypt. There is some evidence that BELLY DANCE may have been performed in Turkish Palaces. There is also some speculation that this 'Women's Dance' was made into a dance for men by liberalisation under The British Empire.

One thing is clear, BELLY DANCE in Turkey and Egypt are in different styles with Turkish performers being more athletic with larger whole body moves. However, in Egypt, the dance is more static and un-athletic with more focus on hip shaking and certain stylistic movements that are not seen in Turkish artists.

MIDDLE EASTERN DANCE and MUSIC are something that that Modern Turkey had no real place for and for decades until the time of Cinema. Turkish Films tended to copy Egypt's Films with BELLY DANCERS that were imported from Cairo for a time then stopped as Arabic was a language that was 'forbidden' in The Turkish Republic. Turk Cinema employed BELLY DANCE numbers that were out of context with contemporary Turkish Culture but blindly followed Egypt as other film industries were not so similar in culture to Turkey.

BELLY DANCE became re-established in Turkey through Cinema but with an image of larger heavier ladies imitating Egyptian Cinema. BELLY DANCE became mainly a Tourist Culture done in night clubs or theatres. The 1980s the interest in MIDDLE EASTERN ENTERTAINMENT waned.

{Wait Up To 10 Seconds - Slow Buffering}
'WAYEYE RA PA RANJO' is a 1990s cinema orchestral version of a traditional Pashto folk song. It is an interesting example for International Audiences to hear as an example of effective ORCHESTRATION that detracts from the feature of REPETITION and narrow TESSITURA [size of range of melody note span]. These features are appreciated by local audiences of Pushto Music but listeners from outside of the Pathan regions tend to find these features disengaging. Thus, selecting 'Wayaye Ra Pa Ranjo' a variety of listeners may hopefully find a more inviting ORCHESTRAL window to look into Pushto Media which more REPETITIVE songs may have dissuaded them to do.

{Wait Up To 10 Seconds - Slow Buffering}
'WAYEYE RA PA RANJO' is a 1990s cinema orchestral version of a traditional Pashto folk song. It is an interesting example for International Audiences to hear as an example of effective ORCHESTRATION that detracts from the feature of REPETITION and narrow TESSITURA [size of range of melody note span]. These features are appreciated by local audiences of Pushto Music but listeners from outside of the Pathan regions tend to find these features disengaging. Thus, selecting 'Wayaye Ra Pa Ranjo' a variety of listeners may hopefully find a more inviting ORCHESTRAL window to look into Pushto Media which more REPETITIVE songs may have dissuaded them to do.

VISUAL AESTHETICS
In purely one opinion, the VISUALS and AESTHETICS of the picturisation do totally spoil this song. The melody is so beautifully ORCHESTRATED and performed but the visual 'VULGARITY', typical of Pashto Cinema of the 1990s, does not match the musical brilliance....

"Pashto Films are a sort of 'mercy' on men who may never get married, see a woman's body or see a woman dance..." This is a candid comment from a Pushto director interviewed on 'Wild Scenes' about Pushto Cinema in Pakistan:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ff4zzhzPHBc

The Cinema in Pakistan seemed to go from a secular pastime up to the 1970s to, "something unwholesome to work in or watch" from the 1980s onwards. It was here that 'THE VULGARITY' took root proper in Punjabi and Pushto films. Suggestive moves had gradually moved onto Pakistan Screen from the early 70s with songs from 'Banrasi Thug' etc., but then became such 'bump and grind' that families could no longer attend film showings together for embarrassment.

The Conservative Pathan Cinema management was sold onto state governers and ministers who saw the financial potential for 'erotic' dance and acting. 'VUGARITY' became the hallmark of Pushto Cinema and was pushed through the censors by the local political figures who owned the films companies and cinemas. A few Pushto movie dancers/actresses were Pathan like Musarrat Shaheen [who is now standing for government] but in an ultra-conservative society, it is difficult and dangerous for ladies to work in the cinema, especially Pushto Media. So, the solution was to employ Punjabi actresses like Nazoo for example. However, the Pushto language barrier is a problem so there is a need for VOICE ACTRESSES [a native speaker of the language to record the spoken dialogue for a Punjabi actress to mime as if using her own voice].

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Created 5 years ago.

126 videos

Category Education

KHAARTOUM_EAST an ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL [study of music in time, space, politic, language, culture] PROJECT documenting EASTERN COMMERCIAL MUSICS in ENGLISH to SHARE* with the WORLD ; ) * Videos used as Fair Use for Educational Purposes