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After being forced to move west during the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee Nation was bitterly divided into two factions. Although they remained officially unified, the factionalism remained through the Civil War and reemerged as a division between the Cherokee who favored the Union, or at least neutrality, and those who wanted to ally with the Confederacy. Similar to the border states, the decision to join the Confederacy was controversial, and many Native Americans refused to fall in line, demonstrating that the alliance with the Confederacy was not as simple as many historians make it seem.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 32nd episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/65AydcLEcQJbnXJ85drimp

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

The midterm elections failed to produce an overwhelming Blue Wave, and political rancor in the US remains feverishly high. Now an astonishing new article in 'The Intelligencer' (NYMag.com/intelligencer/2018/11/maybe-its-time-for-america-to-split-up.html) considers the idea of a "federated" America, broken up into several political entities associated via compacts. It's not a dystopian view of a possible future, but rather a clear-eyed projection of what a political breakup of America might actually look like.

But is a breakup feasible? Does it have to involve outright secession by several states, or can some form of federalism allow Team Red and Team Blue to live together, even uneasily? Is Mises's conception of true self-determination, implemented by smaller administrative units rather than huge centralized states, lost to us today? Michael Boldin (Mises.org/Boldin) of the Tenth Amendment Center joins Jeff Deist to discuss the realities behind breaking up the US politically.

Presented at the 2018 Mises Institute Symposium with Ron Paul: "We Need Alternative Media" in Lake Jackson, Texas, on 3 November 2018. Includes an introduction by Jeff Deist.

In 1861, the Five Civilized Tribes — the Cherokees, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Seminoles — would be faced with the decision of staying neutral or choosing a side in the Civil War. To understand their decision, Chris Calton takes a look at the long history of Indians becoming, in the eyes of Americans, "civilized".

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 31st episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/65AydcLEcQJbnXJ85drimp

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

The legacy media doesn't report news, it produces a show. "The Show" lies to us, divides us, inflames the culture wars, and creates political division. The old broadcast networks, cable channels, newspapers, and magazines all actively work against liberty and correct economics—so the importance of alternative sources for news, economics, history, and politics has never been greater.

Jeff Deist spoke on the topic of new and old media at our recent event in Texas.

We're often told that submission to government edicts is "voluntary" because we have "representative" government. The evidence suggests, however, that politicians don't represent their constituents. Nor could they, even if they wanted to.

Ryan McMaken (Mises.org/McMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian.

Original article: https://mises.org/wire/no-matter-how-you-vote-politicians-dont-represent-you

After months of growing tension between the United States and Britain, a single event nearly plunged the two countries into war. When a Union naval officer illegally boarded a British mail ship and arrested two Confederate diplomats, many British leaders saw it as a deliberate provocation, engineered by William Seward, to provoke Britain into a war over its Canadian territory. After news of the arrest reached London, tempers were so high that many people, in reflection, believe that the only thing that prevented war was the delayed communication between the two countries that came from a broken telegraph cable.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 30th episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Voting "no" on a tax increase doesn't mean you really consented to it. And, Lysander Spooner argued there's not anything wrong with voting "defensively."

Ryan McMaken (Mises.org/McMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian

Original article: https://mises.org/wire/no-voting-doesnt-mean-you-support-system

Even before taking office, Secretary of State William Seward had a history of making threatening statements toward Britain. After the war began, he continued to make one diplomatic faux pas after another, worrying Britain enough that they started sending troops to Canada in preparation for a possible war with the United States.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 29th episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

This week, we feature a recent episode of Ryan McMaken's Radio Rothbard podcast (Mises.org/RothPod).

We continue to hear about how capitalism and industrialization distract us from the important things in life. In reality, the historical record shows that it was industrialization and capitalism that propagated the conditions under which we can afford to treat each other more humanely.

Radio Rothbard is a series of short podcasts based on columns and research from the Mises Institute's Mises Wire (Mises.org/Wire). Topics include economics, comparative politics, and history. Subscribe to Radio Rothbard (Mises.org/RothPod) today on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Soundcloud, or via RSS.

Ryan McMaken (Mises.org/McMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian.

The Union defeat at Ball’s Bluff would prove to be the final straw for the Congressional Republicans, who had been growing increasingly distressed by the Union failures at the outset of the war. Their response was to form a committee tasked with investigating the war—which really meant a political witch hunt determined to find alleged secessionist sympathizers and military scapegoats upon whom the politicians could place the blame for the Union failures.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 28th episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Almost twenty-five years after his death, unpublished material by Murray Rothbard is still being released. Professor Patrick Newman (Mises.org/PNewman), editor of 'The Progressive Era' (Mises.org/ProgEra), is hard at work on the long lost fifth volume of 'Conceived in Liberty' (Mises.org/CIL)—Rothbard's epic history of colonial America.

How did one man write so much, and what can he still teach us today? Don't miss this terrific talk from a leading Rothbard scholar.

Money spent on "luxuries" goes to support ordinary people who use profits from luxury goods to make a living and support their families.

Original article: Mises.org/wire/its-ok-buy-your-pet-halloween-costume-and-other-luxuries

Ryan McMaken (Mises.org/McMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian

Radio Rothbard is available online at:
https://Mises.org/RothPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/688
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/radio-rothbard/id1352049982
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/Iitxpnarezvjovg3kqnyp5iexfm?t=Radio_Rothbard
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/radio-rothbard
Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=174467

Why is it that starving Venezuelans are eating dogs while Americans are rescuing dogs from hurricanes?

Original article: https://mises.org/wire/capitalism-makes-us-more-humane

Ryan McMaken (Mises.org/McMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian.

Some inequality arises naturally from freedom of choice. Some comes from government meddling. One is good and the other is bad.

Original article: Mises.org/wire/yes-inequality-problem-%E2%80%94-when-caused-government

Ryan McMaken (@RyanMcMaken) is the editor of Mises Wire and The Austrian.

Radio Rothbard is available online at:
https://Mises.org/RothPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/688
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/radio-rothbard/id1352049982
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/Iitxpnarezvjovg3kqnyp5iexfm?t=Radio_Rothbard
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/radio-rothbard
Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=174467

After General Stone’s “slight demonstration” erupted into a small-scale battle, communication errors and battlefield mistakes continued to make matters worse for the Union army. The battle would not only end in a Union defeat, but it would also claim the life of one of President Lincoln’s closest personal friends.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 27th episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

What's the biggest and most dangerous financial bubble? Sovereign debt issued by profligate governments. And unlike stocks or corporate debt, government bond bubbles harm millions of ordinary people when they burst.

Economist Daniel Lacalle (Mises.org/Lacalle) joins Jeff Deist to figure out the bizarro world of the bond bubble: negative interest rates, anemic rate spreads between government bonds and "high yield" bonds, and central banks as the unseemly buyers of last resort. They discuss the Fed's interest rate hikes, Jerome Powell's focus on data, the US housing market, and why all of us have a stake in seeing central bank balance sheets shrink.

Related article: "Daniel Lacalle on the Bond Bubble" (dlacalle.com/en/us-ten-year-shows-the-extent-of-the-bond-bubble)

Presented at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 29, 2018.

Presented at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 29, 2018.

Hear Judge Denson's full story at Mises.org/BirthMI

Presented at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 28, 2018.

Silicon Valley used to be a hotbed of libertarian thought, a place where innovation mattered more than government. Today, companies like Twitter and Facebook serve as de facto editors, banning users like Alex Jones for "wrong-think." Google dominates search, but may steer search results. And Amazon serves nefarious clients like the NSA with its cloud infrastructure. And all of them employ plenty of lobbyists to avoid the kind of government anti-trust suit Microsoft faced nearly 20 years ago.

Libertarians oppose regulation, but also oppose censorship and politically correct culling of opinion. Dr. Peter Klein recently addressed these topics and more, in a talk addressing how how the technology sector has drastically changed in recent years—and how tech firms evolved into media companies focused on influence instead of innovation. He argues that social-media companies put on a public facade of being private and free of government influence, but behind the really lobby for protection against competition.

Presented at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 29, 2018.

Presented at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 28, 2018.

Featuring the following authors:

Patrick Newman (Mises.org/PNewman), 'The Progressive Era' and 'Conceived in Liberty, Vol. 5'
Connor Boyack (Mises.org/Boyack), 'The Tuttle Twins and the Fate of the Future'
David Gordon (Mises.org/Gordon), Preview of 'Rothbard A – Z'
Mark Thornton (Mises.org/Thornton), 'The Skyscraper Curse'

Recorded at the Mises Institute's 2018 Supporters Summit in Auburn, Alabama. Recorded on September 28, 2018.

Lincoln believed that Kentucky, one of the four remaining slave states, was crucial to the Union war effort. Although the state was more thoroughly Unionist than other border states, such as Missouri and Maryland, the administration did not want to take any chances, sending the state’s loyalists thousands of guns and carrying out a policy of political arrests to ensure that Kentucky could not be taken over by secessionists. This episode concludes our look at the border states and the Union effort to prevent their secession.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 25th episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

Historical Controversies is available online at:
https://Mises.org/HCPod
RSS: https://mises.org/itunes/622
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/historical-controversies/id1304510096?mt=2
Google Play: https://play.google.com/music/m/I3vmki7pz7jxond4x7qx5dfjv7y?t=Historical_Controversies
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/misesmedia/sets/historical-controversies
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=147145

Music: "On the Ground" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

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Created 1 year, 10 months ago.

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CategoryNews & Politics

The Mises Institute is the research and educational center of classical liberalism, libertarian political theory, and the Austrian School of economics.