Cis White Male with Extra Privilege

Link to previous part - https://www.bitchute.com/video/MxMgmydAGYVb/

0:00 - 814 - Written by a monk from Bobbio (in Italy)
Planctus de Obitu Karoli, or "Lament on the Death of Charlemagne"
Charlemagne or Charles the Great, a member of the Carolingian dynasty, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and the first Holy Roman Emperor from 800. On January 28, 814, he died of pleurisy, a lung disease.
This song was written shortly after.

9:30 - Early to mid 800s - Rabanus Maurus (German) - Veni Creator Spiritus (Come, Creator Spirit)
Translated and paraphrased into several languages, and adapted into many musical forms, often as a hymn for Pentecost or for other occasions that focus on the Holy Spirit.

12:33 - Circa 800s - Unknown - Audi Tellus, Audi Magni Maris Limbus
The first verse translated reads -
"Hear, earth;
hear the edge of the great sea;
Listen man;
hear all that liveth under the sun:
It will come, it is near
day of supreme wrath
unseen day
bitter day
which alone will flee
the sun will blush
the moon will change
the day will turn black
the stars will fall upon the earth."

19:49 - Circa early 900s - Unknown (French) - Incipit Planctus Karoli (Karoli's Lament Begins)
The first line (A solis ortu...) is drawn from a fifth-century hymn of Caelius Sedulius. As the Sedulian hymn was sung at Christmas time, the sorrowful Planctus presents a contrast with the joy typically associated with its opening. The poet expands upon his personal grief at the death of his emperor—and benefactor of Bobbio—by asking all the regions of Earth to mourn with him, and using the tears of Saint Columbanus, founder of Bobbio, as a symbol of the monastery's grief.

25:23 - 900s - Otfrid von Weißenburg (German)
Thes abet er ubar woroltring
A song about the last day of judgement before God. A translation of the first verse reads as follows.
"For the entire world a judgement day has been set,
before a powerful court, and we must fear it. I say
this loudly: there will be no one who can avoid
appearing before this court!"

32:55 - Circa 900s - Unknown (German) - Muspilli (a fragment from text)
Muspilli is an Old High German poem known in incomplete form (103 lines) from a ninth-century Bavarian manuscript. Its subject is the fate of the soul immediately after death and at the Last Judgment.

40:52 - Circa prior 884 - Notker Balbulus (Swiss)
Quid tu, virgo (Why thou, virgin)
The first verse roughly translated reads -
"Why do you, virgin, Mother, weep, beautiful Rachel, Jacob pleases? Let the wisdom of his old sister help him Wipe, mother, How do the wrinkles of your cheeks suit you? Alas, alas, alas; When I was bereaved, who alone would take care, Who would not surrender to the enemies the narrow borders which Jacob had acquired for me, and who would benefit from the stupid brothers, many of whom I,unfortunately, brought out. Is he to be wept, who possessed the heavenly kingdom? and who helps the poor brothers with frequentprayers to God?"

Previous part - https://www.bitchute.com/video/KK1zAlbYK7WZ/

0:00 - Early 900s - Unknown artist and title - Probably of German originEarliest known practical piece of polyphonic music, recently discovered in 2014 within a British Library manuscript in London. Origin of north-west Germany, somewhere around Paderborn or Düsseldorf

1:12 - 900s - Unknown (Greek) - O Aggelos Eboa, The Angel Cried

2:30 - 900s - Unknown, possibly Odo of Cluny (French) From the Musica Enchiriadis, an anonymous musical treatise of the 9th century. It is the first surviving attempt to set up a system of rules for polyphony in western art music.

6:17 - 900s - Unknown (Spanish) - Attende Domine (Hear Us, O Lord)
A Christian liturgical chant for the season of Lent, referred to in English as the Lent Prose. The themes of this hymn are the sinfulness of man and the mercy of God, a theological concept emphasized during Lent.

9:43 - 900s - Unknown (Greek origin) - Kyrie eleison (Lord, have mercy)
The prayer, "Kyrie, eleison," "Lord, have mercy" derives from a Biblical phrase. Greek ἐλέησόν με κύριε
"have mercy on me, Lord" is the Septuagint (the Greek version of the Hebrew bible) translation of the phrase חָנֵּנִי יְהוָה found often in Psalms ( 6:2, 9:13, 31:9, 86:3, 123:3). The way it is performed has changed repeatedly throughout history.

12:26 - 900s - Unknown (Spanish) - Song of the Sibyl
A liturgical drama and a Gregorian chant, the lyrics of which comprise a prophecy describing the Apocalypse, which has been performed in churches on Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) and Alghero (Sardinia, Italy), and some Catalan churches, in the Catalan language on Christmas Eve nearly uninterruptedly since medieval times.

HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD HOES MAD

Timestamps in comments.

0:00 - Various bird songs at a pond in Germany.
Before man ever produced music, he would have first heard the sounds of nature.

1:03 - The use of fire was crucial in gaining access to many nutrient sources, which enabled the development of larger brains. This also would have been a common sound when sleeping

European evidence suggests that early hominins moved into northern latitudes without the habitual use of fire. It was only much later, from 300,000 to 400,000 years ago onward, that fire became a significant part of the hominin technological repertoire.

3:12 - Beech Forest of Germany in Spring

4:09 - European Robin
a male singing his territorial song

4:38 - 1,600,000 BC - English - Stone handaxe - An Acheulean handaxe from Swakscombe, Kent (England). Named for St. Acheul on the Somme River in France, where the first tools from this tradition were found.

5:08- Common Redstart

5:38 - 400,000 - 200,000 BC - Central Europe - Stone tools found in a neanderthal flint workshop discovered in Poland

6:08 - Sparrowhawk

6:45 - Rock Dove mating call

7:16 - 80,000 - 40,000 BC - French - An Aurignacian blade shown from three angles. Named for the French village of Aurignac, where prehistoric remains were discovered in a cave in 1860, the Aurignacian culture is associated with th

7:46 - Eurasian Collared Dove

8:39 - Male Collared Dove Calling To Female

9:11 - 50,000-60,000 BC - Neanderthal - Divje Babe flute
The world's oldest known musical instrument, thought to have been made by Neanderthals, and found in what is modern day Slovenia. Made from the leg bone of a cave bear.

10:11 - 35,000 - 40,000 BC - German - Venus of Hohle Fels
Oldest undisputed example of a depiction of a human being.

11:11 - Inhabited 40,000-30,000 BC - Potočka zijalka cave
Site where the Divje Babe flute was discovered. In the Eastern Karawank mountains in Slovenia, where the remains of a human residence, dated to the Aurignacian era.

11:41 - 42,000 - 43,000 BC - German cave
Flutes made of mammoth tusks. Cave in Geißenklösterle, in southern Germany, near Munich. The discovery supports the thinking that humans followed the River Danube bringing technological in

12:41 - 42,000 - 43,000 BC - German cave - Flute made of bird bone. Oldest known musical instruments.

13:41 - 35,000 - 40,000 BC - German - Bird bone flute - The oldest known human flute, from Hohle Fels Cave in Germany. A thin bird-bone flute carved from a Griffon Vulture

14:11 - Inhabited 40,000 BC - German - Hohle Fels Cave, entrance -

14:41 - Inhabited 40,000 BC - German - Hohle Fels Cave, interior -

15:11 - Eurasian Teal

15:48 - 35,000 - 40,000 BC - German
Lion-Human of Hohlenstein-Stadel
Carved out of mammoth ivory using a flint knife.
Thought to be modled after a European cave lion,
which are now extinct

16:18 - Greylag Goose

16:52 - 35,000 - 40,000 BC - German
Adorant from the Geißenklösterle cave
Made from mammoth ivoryUsually interpreted as an expression of worship,
which is why in German the figure is called an adorant, a word meaning
worshipper

17:22 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Brillenhöhle cave - More of the path leading to the cave

17:52 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Brillenhöhle cave
Path leading to the cave

18:22 - Common cuckoo

18:57 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Brillenhöhle cave - Entrance of the cave.
The gate (a modern addition obviously) is only opened for researches now, or special occasions.

19:27 - Barn swallow

19:57 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Brillenhöhle cave
At one time local teenagers used to use the cave for parties. The site of many archeological findings, and near
Geißenklösterle, also the site of several ancient artefacts and inha

20:27 - Green woodpecker

20:50 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Germany - Path from Brillenhöhle to Geißenklösterle - The 'Kissing Sow' rock formation in the top left

21:20 - Red Back Shrike

21:50 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Germany - Path from Brillenhöhle to Geißenklösterle
The path continues through this natural arch

22:20 - Cicada orni

22:48 - Inhabited 30,000 - 12,000 BC - Germany - Geißenklösterle cave entrance.
The site of several archeological findings

23:18 - Common frog

23:55 - 35,000-11,000 BC - Spain - Cave of Altamira painting - Bison

24:25 - Mole cricket

24:55 - 35,000-11,000 BC - Spain - Cave of Altamira painting
Bison on the roof of the pit

25:25 - Black forest thunderstorm

25:55 - Fireflies, also called Lightning bugs

27:40 - Fireflies, also called Lightning bugs

28:10 - Tawny owl

28:46 - 32,000 BC - French - Cave Hyena - Found in the Chauvet cave.
The European cave hyena was much larger than its modern African cousin, estimated to weigh 225 lbs, compared to the African which only weighs 170lb at the upper limit

Previous part - https://www.bitchute.com/video/j5DGAveK9e1f/

Music

0:00 - Early 1000s - Guido d'Arezzo (Italian) - Ut queant laxis - Hymn to Saint John the Baptist

3:48 - Early 1000s - Guido d'Arezzo (Italian) - Miserere mei Deus

6:12 - Circa 1023-1054 - Hermann of Reichenau (German) - Alma Redemptoris Mater (Simple Tone)

7:16 - Circa 1023-1054 - Hermann of Reichenau (German) - Salve Regina

10:03 - Circa 1023-1054 - Hermann of Reichenau (German) - Veni Sancte Spiritus

16:37 - 1000s - Unknown (French) - Alleluia - Vidimus stellam. II mode

18:57 - 1040 - Turoldus (French) - The Song of Roland
Based on the Frankish military leader Roland at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778, during the reign of Charlemagne. It is the oldest surviving major work of French literature

22:04 - 11-13th Century - Unknown, but thought to be mostly from young student clergy who satirized the Catholic Church (German) - Codex Buranus - Tempus Est Iocundum (The Time Is Pleasing)
A manuscript of 254 poems and dramatic texts mostly from the 11th or 12th century, although some are from the 13th century. The pieces are mostly bawdy, irreverent, and satirical. This song is about burning virgin love.

25:55 - 1000s - Unknown (Swedish) - Sackpipslät

28:34 - 11th or 12th Century) - William IX, Duke of Aquitaine (French) - Pos de chantar, Cançon

Previous part - https://www.bitchute.com/video/uTd1DxSOoRJF/

Music

0:00 - Early 1100s - Saint Godric of Finchale (English) - Sainte Nicholas, Godes Druth

0:57 - Early 1100s - Saint Godric of Finchale (English) Sainte Marië viërgenë

2:20 - Early 1100s - Saint Godric of Finchale (English) - Crist and Sainte Marie

3:47 - 1100s - Nikolaos Moraitis (Greek) - O Aggelos Eboa

6:41 - 1100s - William IX (French) - Pos Des Chantar M'es Pres Talenz

10:08 - 1100s - Unknown (French) - L'autrier m'iere levaz
The song itself is about a knight who professes love to a shepherdess named Ermenjon

13:01 - 1100-1300 - Gregorian Chant (Italian) - Adorate Deum

15:12 - 1100-1300 - Gregorian Chant (Italian) - Dominus illuminatio mea

17:11 - 1100-1300 - Gregorian Chant (Italian) - Introitus Da pacem

19:05 - 1130-1150 - Marcabru (French) - Bel m'es quan li fruch madur

21:30 - 1150-1160 - Der von Kürenberg (German) - Ich zoch mir einen valken (Falkenlied or The Falcon Song) A song about a woman who raises a falcon

26:27 - Mid 1100s - Hildegard von Bingen (German) - Canticles of Ecstasy - Ensemble Sequentia

31:17 - 1170 - Leonin (French) - Magnus Liber - Canto gregoriano Organi, siglo XII

35:51 - 1170 - Leonin (French) - Organum Duplum

36:19 - Late 1100s - Raimbaut de Vaqueiras (French) - Kalenda maya

39:09 - Late 1100s - Countess of Die (French) - A chantar m'er de so qu'eu non volria

41:45 - 1188 - Raimbaut de Vaqueiras (French) - El son que pus m'agensa

45:06 - 1198 - Perotin (French) - Viderunt Omnes

48:30 - 1199 - Pérotin (French) - Sederunt principes

Chapter 24 - Residence of Julian at Antioch — His successful Expedition against the Persians — Passage of the Tigris — The Retreat and Death of Julian — Election of Jovian

Music Timestamps

0:00 - 1201 – Raimbaut de Vaqueiras (French) - Ara pot hom conoisser e proar
3:29 - 1204–05 – Raimbaut de Vaqueiras (French) - No·m agrad' iverns ni pascors
8:04 - 1220 - Pérotin (French) - Beata Viscera
14:05 - 1235 - Moniot d'Arras (French) - Ce fut en mai
16:38 - 1235–39 – Theobald I of Navarre (French) - Seignor, sachiés, qui or ne s’en ira (chanson de croisade)
21:06 - 1239 – Theobald I of Navarre (French) - Au tens plain de felonie (chanson de croisade)
23:22 - 1250 - 1280 - Anonymous (French origin) - Diex! je n'i os aler - From the Montpelliar Codex
24:19 - 1250 - 1280 - Anonymous (French origin) - Pucelete bele et avenant - From the Montpellier Codex
25:00 - 1250 -1280 - Anonymous (French origin) - Plus bele que flor est - From the Montpellier Codex
28:45 - 1250-1280 - Anonymous (French origin) - S'on e regarde - The Montpellier Codex was assembled in the years 1280-1300, is the largest single collection of polyphonic music prior to the Renaissance

Art

1205 - (French) - The Legend of the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus - Tells of seven brothers condemned to death because of their Christian faith. They took refuge in a cave, where they fell into a sleep that lasted several centuries. When the cave was inadvertently opened, the brothers were awakened, and the miracle was recognized by the local bishop. In this panel, one of eleven from the lost window, the Christian emperor Theodosius with two companions rides to Ephesus to see the brothers.

1215 - (anonymous French architect, "The Master of Chartres") The west rose window at Chartres Cathedral

1220-1230 - (anonymous French architect, "The Master of Chartres") - Jamb statues at Chartres Cathedral - From the Porch of the Confessors in Chartres Cathedral - The canons (priests) started their religious services in the building as early as 1220

1221-1230 - (anonymous French architect, "The Master of Chartres") - South transept window at Chartres Cathedral

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - King David, missing his harp

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - King Solomon flanked by prophets and patriarchs. The round medallions on the roof contained at one time scenes from the life of Christ.

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - St John the apostle, holding a model church or city. Busts of virtues decorate the spaces between the arches.

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - The Crucifixion

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - The Epiphany. Enamel, filigree, precious stones, pearls and even roman cameos adorn the gilded scenes.

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - The facade with the open panel, revealing the relics of the Three Kings.

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings - The prophet Joachim on the lower tier

1225 - Nicholas of Verdun (French) - Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral in Germany

1225-1229 - (anonymous) - Bamberg Horseman carved at Bamberg Cathedral in Germany

1229 - Catalan School (Spanish) completes James I the Conqueror Besieging Palma, Majorca

1229 - Herman the Recluse (Czech) - The Codex Gigas - Opening with the portrait of the devil - Legend states that, as a resident of the Benedictine Monastery of Podlazice, Herman the Recluse was condemned to be walled up alive and starved to death. However, in a plea for his life, he convinced the Abbot to let him live if he could create a book that encapsulated all earthly knowledge in one night. Herman wrote until midnight, upon which he realized he could not finish his masterpiece and sold his soul to a devil in exchange for the ability to finish the Codex Gigas.

1229 - Herman the Recluse (Czech) - The Codex Gigas - A closer look at the portrai of the devil

1229 - Herman the Recluse (Czech) - The Codex Gigas - Illuminated initial at the start of the Wisdom of Solomon

1235 - Bonaventura Berlinghieri (Italian) - Saint Francis of Assisi - Pope Gregory IX canonized Francis on 16 July 1228. Along with Catherine of Siena, he was designated patron saint of Italy. He later became associated with patronage of animals and the natural environment, and it became customary for churches to hold ceremonies blessing animals on his feast day of 4 October.

1235 - (anonymous French architect, "The Master of Chartres") - North transept rose window at Chartres Cathedral - Consecration of the cathedral took place on the 17th of October 1260, in the presence of King Saint-Louis

1245-1247 - (French) - Vision of Saint Germain of Paris - This panel is one of two scenes from the Legend of Saint Germain of Paris. Here Germain appears posthumously in a dream to a monk from Saint-Germain-des-Prés, exhorting the brother to maintain his faith.

"Leiningen Versus the Ants" by Carl Stephenson is a classic short story published in the December 1938 edition of Esquire. It is a translation, probably by Stephenson himself, of "Leiningens Kampf mit den Ameisen" which was originally published in German in 1938.

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Category Education

"And just how," the mongoose demanded scornfully of the serpent, "do you propose to climb Mount Kailash, the home of Lord Siva? You who have neither arms nor hands, neither feet nor toes with which to grip the precipices?"

"Very slowly," the serpent replied. "Carefully. Coiling back and forth upon my belly, over a rock here, up through a crevice there. I shall get there in the end, you know."

The mongoose snorted in derision. But in his heart he suspected the serpent spoke truly.

- Indian fable

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